A mole cricket. After Eisenbeis Wichard 1987. .


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Description
Figure 9.1. Diagrammatic perspective of a dirt profile demonstrating some regular litter and soil creepy crawlies and different hexapods. Note that creatures living on the dirt surface and in litter have longer legs than those discovered more profound in the ground. Creatures happening somewhere down in the dirt more often than not are legless or have decreased legs; they are unpigmented and frequently dazzle. The creatures delineated are: (1) specialist of a wood subterranean insect
Transcripts
Slide 1

A mole cricket. (After Eisenbeis & Wichard 1987.)

Slide 2

Figure 9.1 Diagrammatic perspective of a dirt profile demonstrating some run of the mill litter and soil creepy crawlies and different hexapods. Take note of that living beings living on the dirt surface and in litter have longer legs than those discovered further in the ground. Living beings happening somewhere down in the dirt for the most part are legless or have decreased legs; they are unpigmented and regularly visually impaired. The living beings portrayed are: (1) laborer of a wood subterranean insect (Hymenoptera: Formicidae); (2) springtail (Collembola: Isotomidae); (3) ground creepy crawly (Coleoptera: Carabidae); (4) wander bug (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) eating a springtail; (5) hatchling of a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae); (6) japygid dipluran (Diplura: Japygidae) assaulting a littler campodeid dipluran; (7) pupa of a ground bug (Coleoptera: Carabidae); (8) bristletail (Archaeognatha: Machilidae); (9) female earwig (Dermaptera: Labiduridae) tending her eggs; (10) wireworm, hatchling of a tenebrionid bug (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae); (11) hatchling of a looter fly (Diptera: Asilidae); (12) hatchling of an officer fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae); (13) springtail (Collembola: Isotomidae); (14) hatchling of a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); (15) hatchling of a muscid fly (Diptera: Muscidae); (16) proturan (Protura: Sinentomidae); (17) springtail (Collembola: Isotomidae); (18) hatchling of a March fly (Diptera: Bibionidae); (19) hatchling of a scarab bug (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). (Singular life forms after different sources, particularly Eisenbeis & Wichard 1987.)

Slide 3

Figure 9.2 Fossorial fore legs of: (an) a mole cricket of Gryllotalpa (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae); (b) a nymphal periodical cicada of Magicicada (Hemiptera: Cicadidae); and (c) a scarab creepy crawly of Canthon (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). ((an) After Frost 1959; (b) after Snodgrass 1967; (c) after Richards & Davies 1977.)

Slide 4

Box 9.1

Slide 5

Box 9.2

Slide 6

Figure 9.3 A crest molded passage exhumed by the bark scarab Scolytus unispinosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) demonstrating eggs at the closures of various exhibitions; development demonstrates a grown-up insect. (After Deyrup 1981.)

Slide 7

Figure 9.4 Underside of the thorax of the creepy crawly Henoticus serratus (Coleoptera: Cryptophagidae) demonstrating the discouragements, called mycangia, which the bug uses to transport contagious material that vaccinates new substrate on as of late copied wood. (In the wake of drawing by Göran Sahlén in Wikars 1997.)

Slide 8

Figure 9.5 A couple of fertilizer creepy crawlies of Onthophagus gazella (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) filling in the passages that they have unearthed underneath an excrement cushion. The inset demonstrates an individual manure ball inside which creepy crawly advancement happens: (an) egg; (b) hatchling, which sustains on the excrement; (c) pupa; and (d) grown-up only before rise. (After Waterhouse 1974.)

Slide 9

Figure 9.6 The organism patio nurseries of the leaf-cutter subterranean insect, Atta cephalotes (Formicidae), require a steady supply of takes off. (an) A medium-sized specialist, called a media, cuts a leaf with its serrated mandibles while a minor laborer protects the media from a parasitic phorid fly ( Apocephalus ) that lays its eggs on living ants. (b) A guarding minor catches a ride on a leaf part conveyed by a media. (After Eibl-Eibesfeldt & Eibl-Eibesfeldt 1967.)

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