Address 28: Production network Planning 2.


73 views
Uploaded on:
Category: Sales / Marketing
Description
Autos, PCs, buyer hardware. Booking issues are distinctive J. Christopher ... May oblige criticism of data to the medium-term and a determination ...
Transcripts
Slide 1

Address 28: Supply Chain Scheduling 2 © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 2

Outline Discrete Manufacturing versus Continuous Manufacturing What Difference Does It Make? A Typical Framework for Supply Chain Optimization Medium Term Planning Short Term Scheduling Information System Issues © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 3

Supply Chain Scheduling © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 4

Discrete versus Persistent Manufacturing Continuous (procedure) creation Main stock/items are finely distinguishable Steel, cleanser, paper Discrete generation Main stock/items are exclusively countable Cars, PCs, buyer hardware Scheduling issues are diverse © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 5

Continuous: 1. Principle Processing Raw materials are changed to transitional items Machines have high start-up/shutdown expenses and High changeover costs Often altered cluster sizes Usually run all day, every day © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 7

Continuous: 2. Completing Products of fundamental procedures are "particular" Cut, twisted, expelled, painted, printed, … Often these are items Many customers Mix of make-to-stock, make-to-request Due dates, succession subordinate changeovers, and stock administration are critical © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 8

Discrete: 1. Essential Conversion Like completing in constant Stamping, bowing, cutting Process is for the most part really basic Output is regularly a section Car body part, PC case, … Schedule is frequently coordinated with downstream procedures © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 9

Discrete: 2. Primary Production Many diverse operations of numerous devices 100 stage process for semiconductors! Machines are extremely costly Often composed like a vocation shop Each request has its own course, amount, due date Sequence subordinate changeovers © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 10

Discrete: 3. Get together Put together parts Machines are shabby however material taking care of is vital Assembly lines autos or buyer gadgets Due dates, changeovers, sequencing, … © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 11

Table 8.1 © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 12

Table 8.2 © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 13

Supply Chain Decomposition © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 14

Medium-term Aggregation Time reflection 1 unit = 1 day or 1 week Product deliberation Work at item "family" level e.g., Tuborg brew, not 6-pack, 12, 24, barrel, … Cost/work/limit deliberation Average preparing times Sequence conditions overlooked Factory regarded as a solitary asset © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 15

Medium-term Planning Results Daily or week after week Demand for item families at every office Inventory levels Transportation prerequisites No nitty gritty booking has been finished! © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 16

Medium-term Constrains Short-term © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 17

Medium-term Decouples Short-term © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 18

Short-term Scheduling Uses More Precise Data Time in minutes or seconds Horizon ≈ week, 2 weeks Jobs and assets are point by point Set-up time/expense are checked Products not simply item families Demand for every item is spoken to © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 19

Problem Short term plan arrangement may not exist! Why? May require criticism of data to the medium-term and a resolution Carlsberg takes 10-12 hours for a medium-term understand … © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 20

Feedback Mechanism Needed © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Slide 21

Information Infrastructure Requirements © J. Christopher Beck 2005

Recommended
View more...