America: Pathways to the Present.


107 views
Uploaded on:
Description
America: Pathways to the Present. Part 24. The Vietnam War (1954–1975). America: Pathways to the Present. Part 24: The Vietnam War (1954–1975). Segment 1: War Develops. Segment 2: Battling the War. Area 3: Political Divisions. Area 4: The End of the War. The War Develops.
Transcripts
Slide 1

America: Pathways to the Present Chapter 24 The Vietnam War (1954–1975)

Slide 2

America: Pathways to the Present Chapter 24: The Vietnam War (1954–1975) Section 1: War Unfolds Section 2: Fighting the War Section 3: Political Divisions Section 4: The War\'s End

Slide 3

The War Unfolds Chapter 24, Section 1 What occasions prompted the war between North Vietnam and South Vietnam? What were the Vietnam approaches of President Kennedy and Robert McNamara? How did President Johnson change the war\'s course?

Slide 4

Background of the War Chapter 24, Section 1 According to President Eisenhower’s domino hypothesis , if one Southeast Asian country tumbled to socialism, others would soon take after. Ho Chi Minh, a master Communist pioneer in Vietnam, drove a gathering called the Vietminh against French control of his country some time recently, amid, and after World War II. After the Vietminh effectively crushed the French in 1954, a peace assention called the Geneva Accords isolated Vietnam into Communist North Vietnam and against Communist South Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh drove North Vietnam, while Ngo Dinh Diem drove South Vietnam. The United States started giving financial guide to the French in Vietnam in 1950. In 1960, President Eisenhower sent many military guides to help South Vietnam’s battle against the North.

Slide 5

Diem’s Downfall During the mid 1960s, Ngo Dinh Diem’s approaches lost him the backing of his kin. Understanding that the battle against socialism couldn\'t be won under Diem’s guideline, President Kennedy told South Vietnamese military pioneers that the United States would not protest Diem’s topple. In November 1963, military pioneers seized control of South Vietnam and killed Diem. McNamara’s Role Robert McNamara, President Kennedy’s Secretary of Defense, was persuasive in forming American arrangement toward Vietnam. McNamara utilized his solid business foundation to cut expenses while modernizing the military. In the coming years, McNamara would push for direct American inclusion in Vietnam. Kennedy’s Vietnam Policy Chapter 24, Section 1

Slide 6

President Johnson and Communist Advances Chapter 24, Section 1 Shortly after Diem’s death in November 1963, President Kennedy was killed, and Vice President Johnson accepted the administration. In South Vietnam, the military pioneers who had assumed control over the legislature were unsuccessful and disagreeable. Subsequently, Communist guerrillas in South Vietnam, known as the Viet Cong , made increases in both region and dependability. The Viet Cong’s political wing was known as the National Liberation Front .

Slide 7

What Inspired the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution? What Was the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution? What Additional Powers Did It Give the President? In August 1964, Johnson declared that North Vietnamese torpedo water crafts had assaulted American destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin. On the other hand, a few individuals questioned that this episode had happened and trusted it was just a reason for further U.S. inclusion in Vietnam. The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution , went by Congress in 1964, respected peace and security in Southeast Asia as indispensable to American national hobby, and it gave the President extra powers to help any Southeast Asian nation “requesting help with resistance of its freedoms.” Under the determination, the President had power to “take every single vital measure to repulse any outfitted assault against the strengths of the United States and to anticipate further aggression.” The determination, along these lines, changed the parity of force in the middle of Congress and the President. Growing Presidential Power Chapter 24, Section 1 The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Slide 8

The War Unfolds—Assessment Chapter 24, Section 1 At the Geneva\'s season Accords, who were the pioneers of Vietnam? (A) Ngo Dinh Diem in North Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh in South Vietnam (B) Ho Chi Minh in North Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam (C) Ho Chi Minh in North Vietnam, the Viet Cong in South Vietnam (D) military pioneers in North Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam Which of the accompanying did the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution give? (A) an case of the domino impact (B) a military upset in South Vietnam (C) an end to French control of Vietnam (D) increased presidential force for military activity

Slide 9

The War Unfolds—Assessment Chapter 24, Section 1 At the Geneva\'s season Accords, who were the pioneers of Vietnam? (A) Ngo Dinh Diem in North Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh in South Vietnam (B) Ho Chi Minh in North Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam (C) Ho Chi Minh in North Vietnam, the Viet Cong in South Vietnam (D) military pioneers in North Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam Which of the accompanying did the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution give? (A) an sample of the domino impact (B) a military upset in South Vietnam (C) an end to French control of Vietnam (D) increased presidential force for military activity

Slide 10

Fighting the War Chapter 24, Section 2 How did war zone conditions in Vietnam influence American troopers? How might you portray the war\'s course somewhere around 1965 and 1968? Why was the Tet Offensive a defining moment in the war?

Slide 11

American Troops Had unrivaled weapons Were caught off guard for warmth, landscape, or guerrilla strategies Lacked backing of most South Vietnamese Most never saw the foe yet continually confronted the likelihood of sudden risk. Viet Cong Troops Fought as guerrillas; maintained a strategic distance from head-on conflicts Were acquainted with territory; had backing of numerous South Vietnamese Built and stowed away in involved underground passages Battlefield Conditions Chapter 24, Section 2

Slide 12

The Air and Ground Wars Chapter 24, Section 2 Some Weapons Used in the Vietnam War Land Mines — Land mines, which can be set off by the weight of a stride, are hazardous gadgets planted in the ground. Viet Cong landmines slaughtered and injured both American GIs and Vietnamese regular citizens. Immersion Bombing — American B-52 aircraft planes dropped a huge number of huge amounts of explosives, bringing about immersion besieging of North Vietnam. Fracture Bombs — Fragmentation bombs, dropped by Americans over both North and South Vietnam, tossed bits of their thick metal housings in all headings when they blasted. In South Vietnam, discontinuity bombs executed and injured innumerable regular folks. Bio-chemical defoliants — American pilots dropped a herbicide brought Agent Orange over Vietnamese wildernesses, murdering vegetation and uncovering Viet Cong concealing spots. Bio-chemical defoliants was later found to bring about wellbeing issues in domesticated animals and people. Napalm — Another synthetic weapon utilized as a part of Vietnam, napalm, was a jellylike substance which, when dropped from planes splattered, and smoldered wildly.

Slide 13

Intensifying the War Chapter 24, Section 2 After the decision of 1964, President Johnson started a continuous acceleration , or extension of the war. The quantity of American officers positioned in Vietnam ascended from around 25,000 toward the start of 1965 to about 536,000 before the end of 1968. Initially, American officers had been sent to exhort the South Vietnamese; now their assignment was to prop up a coming up short South Vietnamese government drove by Nguyen Cao Ky. In spite of the extensive development of American troops, somewhere around 1965 and 1967 the war was at a stalemate. Inside of the United States, open deliberation seethed between birds of prey , the individuals who upheld the war, and pigeons , the individuals who did not.

Slide 14

North Vietnamese troops and supplies entered South Vietnam by means of the Ho Chi Minh Trail, a course that went through Laos and Cambodia. The Ho Chi Minh Trail Chapter 24, Section 2

Slide 15

The Tet Offensive: A Turning Point Chapter 24, Section 2 On January 30, 1968, the Viet Cong and North Vietnam dispatched a noteworthy hostile. This arrangement of assaults was known as the Tet Offensive since it happened amid Tet, the Vietnamese New Year. Amid and after the Tet Offensive, both sides were liable of merciless barbarities. Communists butchered anybody they marked a foe; Americans slaughtered many regular citizens at My Lai, a little town in South Vietnam. A helicopter team that ceased the slaughter was later remunerated, and the officer who had requested it was detained. Since Americans now realized that the Viet Cong could dispatch enormous assaults, and in light of the fact that not a single end to the war was to be seen, the Tet Offensive ended up being to be a noteworthy mental triumph for the Viet Cong and a defining moment in the war.

Slide 16

Fighting the War—Assessment Chapter 24, Section 2 Which of the accompanying turned out to be leverage for the Viet Cong? (A) Familiarity with Vietnam’s climate and territory (B) Possession of Agent Orange (C) American military bolster (D) Superior weapons innovation What made the Tet Offensive a defining moment in the war? (A) It occurred in South Vietnam. (B) It brought about enormous setbacks. (C) It made Americans question their contribution in Vietnam. (D) It was surprisingly merciless.

Slide 17

Fighting the War—Assessment Chapter 24, Section 2 Which of the accompanying ended up being favorable position for the Viet Cong? (A) Familiarity with Vietnam’s climate and territory (B) Possession of Agent Orange (C) American military bolster (D) Superior weapons innovation What made the Tet Offensive a defining moment in the war? (A) It occurred in South Vietnam. (B) It brought about enormous setbacks. (C) It made Americans question their contribution in Vietnam. (D) It was abnormally merciless.

Slide 18

Political Divisions Chapter 24, Section 3 What part did understudies play in the challenge developments of the 1960s? Why did President Johnson choose not to look for reelection? How did the Vietnam War influence the race of 1968?

Slide 19

Student Activism Chapter 24, Section 3 Student Activism in the 1960s Gen

Recommended
View more...