CENOZOIC LIFE.


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This gave them the benefit of being dynamic during the evening, when reptiles ... what's more, the insect eating animal are endothernmic, have hair, support their young with milk, yet ...
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Slide 1

CENOZOIC LIFE The CENOZOIC = "The Age of Mammals". The first vertebrates advanced from reptiles. These little, bug eating, vixen like animals, had the benefit of being endothermic - they created their own warmth inside by expending extraordinary measures of nourishment. This gave them the benefit of being dynamic during the evening, when reptiles couldn\'t contend in light of the icy. This empowered the vertebrates to end up predominant toward the end of the Mesozoic, when the atmospheres got colder and huge numbers of the bigger reptiles ceased to exist. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Another mammalian element identified with warmth was the improvement of body hair, to preserve the warmth created inside. Not at all like reptiles, well evolved creatures likewise NURTURE their young utilizing milk. Once more, this kept the youthful warm and guaranteed fast development in the defenseless early phases of life. In this way, warm blooded animals had great ingrained instincts. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Animals that are transitional between the reptiles and genuine warm blooded creatures are still around today - the duck-charged platypus and the insect eating animal are endothernmic, have hair, sustain their young with milk, however they both lay eggs ( MONOTREMES ). Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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The issue of keeping the youthful warm brought about different adjustments, for instance the MARSUPIALS (kangeroos, wombats, wallabies, opossums) - which sustain their young in a pocket; and the PLACENTAL MAMMALS - which convey the youthful inside the body for a more extended time of improvement, nourishing them supplements from a placenta. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Apart from transformative changes intended to keep well evolved creatures warm; different changes additionally happened which were adjustments to the evolving environment. Maybe the most essential of these progressions was the presence of GRASSES and immeasurable PRAIRIES in the Miocene. This prompted the advancement of brushing well evolved creatures - the UNGULATES. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Ungulates are portrayed by persistently developing cheek teeth for biting grass and multi-chambered stomachs for processing intense grass. Because of the absence of spread on the open prairies, these warm blooded animals likewise created pace to escape predators - long legs for running and running on toes, which got to be HOOVES . The ungulates are characterized by number of toes; PERISSODACTYLS = odd-toed (if center toe conveyed weight-> single foot). Cases: zebra, horse, rhino, ungulate. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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ARTIODACTYLS = even-toed (if center 2 toes conveyed weight - > cloven foot). Illustrations: buffalo, pig, deer, hippo. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Other critical requests incorporated the meat eating predators that went after the touching warm blooded animals - ORDER CARNIVORA. Cases: Smilodon (terminated), puppies, raccoons, bears. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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and the well evolved creatures with trunks, harbingers of the current elephant - ORDER PROBOSCIDEA. Cases: mastodons (wiped out), mammoths (terminated), elephants. Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Particularly critical, obviously, was the advancement of the request PRIMATES , recognized by stereoscopic vision and getting a handle on hands - both of which likely developed to encourage an existence in the trees . The primates advanced into the Late Cenozoic predecessors of Homo sapiens, who showed up in the Pleistocene (more next class). Chronicled GEOLOGY CLASS 2010 Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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MIDDLE EOCENE SCENE (primitive ungulates, essentially programs, still loads of backwoods) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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Browsing teeth for smashing leaves, natural product, nuts, branches and so forth (mastodon) Grazing teeth for crushing grass (mammoth) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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LATE EOCENE SCENE (more open green area – all the more since quite a while ago legged slow eaters) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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EARLY MIOCENE SCENE (cooler drier atmosphere; more propelled ungulates) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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EARLY PLIOCENE SCENE (prairies – woods confined to base grounds close waterways) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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LATE PLEISTOCENE SCENE (predominately nibblers) Harry Williams, Historical Geology

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