Christian Ethics. In what manner Should We Live .


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Christian Ethics. How Should We Live?. 2. The Greek Ethical Tradition. Sunday, May 8, 2005 10 to 10:50 am, in the Parlor. Everyone is welcome!.
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Christian Ethics. In what capacity Should We Live? 2. The Greek Ethical Tradition Sunday, May 8, 2005 10 to 10:50 am, in the Parlor. Everybody is welcome!

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Almighty God, by our absolution into the passing and revival of your Son Jesus Christ, you turn us from the old existence of wrongdoing: Grant that we, being renewed to new life in him, may live in exemplary nature and blessedness all our days; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and rules with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.. - Book of Common Prayer, p. 254

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Basic Moral Philosophy, Third Edition , Robert L. Holmes. Thomson Wadsworth, 2003. ISBN 0-534-58477-2 Dr. Holmes is teacher of theory at the University of Rochester.

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The Moral Quest: Foundations of Christian Ethics, Stanley J. Grenz. InterVarsity Press, 2000. ISBN: 0-830-81568-6. Dr. Grenz is teacher of religious philosophy and morals at Carey/Regent College in Vancouver, B.C.

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How Should We Live? An Introduction to Ethics, Louis P. Pojman, Wadsworth Publishing, 2005. ISBN: 0-534-55657-4. Dr. Pojman is teacher of rationality at the United States Military Academy

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Introduction Ethics of Doing versus Being There are two methods for drawing closer the subject of being good or moral: 1. Morals of Doing = Action-based Ethics = Ethics of Conduct . Poses the question: What would it be a good idea for me to do? 2. Morals of Being = Virtue-based Ethics = Aretaic Ethics . Poses the question: What would it be advisable for me to turn into? The antiquated Greeks drew nearer morals as righteousness based. In current times, activity based morals have ruled moral dialogs.

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Introduction Ethics of Doing There are two noteworthy divisions in Ethics of Doing (= Action-based Ethics = Ethics of Conduct ): 1. Relativism : every ethical guideline are relative , and will shift from culture to culture (= Conventional Ethical Relativism or Conventionalism) or even from individual to individual (= Subjective Ethical Relativism or Subjectivism) 2. Objectivism, Absolutism : there are all inclusive good rule that apply to all individuals, paying little respect to the way of life, place, or time that they live. Absolutism : the all inclusive good standards don\'t strife with each other. It ought to (in any event hypothetically) be conceivable to discover one right response to each ethical issue. Objectivism : a portion of the all inclusive good standards may supersede others in a few circumstances.

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Introduction Ethics of Doing All Christian moral speculations of doing concur there are all inclusive good rule that apply to all individuals, paying little mind to the way of life, place or time that they live. A Christian arrangement of morals might be: An Absolutist framework. An Objectivist framework.

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Introduction Ethics of Doing A second significant division in Ethics of Doing (= Action-based Ethics = Ethics of Conduct ) is whether the demonstration itself is naturally right or wrong, or whether the rightness or misleading quality of a demonstration relies on upon the outcomes of the demonstration: 1. Teleological Ethics = Consequentialist Ethics . The ethical quality of a demonstration depends on the result or outcome of the demonstration. 2. Deontological Ethics = Nonconsequentialist Ethics . The profound quality of a demonstration is situated in the demonstration itself. Most Christian morals of doing are fundamentally deontological or nonconsequentialist.

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Introduction Greek Ethical Tradition Today we analyze the establishment of Western morals set around the old Greeks. We will take a gander at Aristotle\'s hypothesis of morals.

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Introduction Christian Ethics and Greek Ethics The Christian gospel ventured into a gentile world, where it met the Greek philosophical custom. Paul went by Athens, the renowned focus of Greek reasoning, and talked with different Greek logicians amid his evangelist trips (Acts 17:16-21). The morals of the old Greeks altogether impacted Christian morals.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Aristotle First scholar in Western human progress to compose an orderly work on morals. Lived from 384 to 323 B.C. Conceived in residential area of Stagira in northern Greece (Thrace), on the boondocks with the propelling "savage" Macedonian domain. Father was Nicomachus, a doctor in the court of Macedonia.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Aristotle 368 B.C.: at age 18, his dad kicked the bucket, and Aristotle left for Athens to join Plato\'s Academy, where he stayed for a long time, first as understudy, then as instructor. 348 B.C.: Plato passed on, and Aristotle left Athens after he didn\'t get designated leader of the foundation. 343 to 340 B.C.: Served as guide for the child of Philip, the ruler of Macedonia. Philip\'s child would get to be known as Alexander the Great.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Aristotle 335 B.C.: came back to Athens and established his own particular foundation of logic, the Lyceum. His address style of strolling forward and backward earned the school the epithet of Peripatos (the "secured walk" or "stroll about"). 323 B.C.: Alexander the Great kicked the bucket abruptly without a beneficiary. Athenian disdain against their Macedonian overlords flared against Aristotle due to his association with Philip and Alexander. Aristotle was accused of demonstrations of profanity. He cleared out Athens and banished himself in Chalcis in Euboea. 322 B.C.: passed on at 63 years old.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Virtue Ethics & the Greeks The morals of the antiquated Greeks were Ethics of Being = Virtue-based Ethics = Aretaic Ethics . They drew nearer morals by asking: What would it be advisable for me to turn into? As excellence ethicists, they were not principally inspired by specific activities , but instead in distinguishing the kind of individual who might act appropriately. The sort of individual who might act appropriately is the "upright individual," a man who has certain qualities or ideals that arrange that individual to act legitimately.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Human Telos Everything on the planet has an end, a reason, a telos : The reason or telos of an oak seed to end up an oak tree. The reason or telos of an egg is turned into a chicken. The reason or telos of engineering is to create structures. The reason or telos of prescription is to advance wellbeing.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Human Telos Human creatures additionally have an end, a reason, a telos : to practice what makes us particular: our capacity to think, consider and mirror: our reason. Aristotle trusted God was occupied with immaculate and everlasting examination. The human end, reason, or telos was to rough this heavenly action.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Virtues An uprightness , at the end of the day, is any trademark that adds to greatness in our capacity to think, ponder, reflect, and in this manner estimated the perfect movement of unadulterated examination. A temperance is any trademark that empowers us to perform or accomplish our motivation, our telos.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Human Soul For Aristotle, the spirit was not, as it was for Plato, an interminable substance unmistakable from the body , yet was rather was a wonder of the physical world (the universe of matter) that emerged when the components of matter joined specifically and unique ways. The spirit in individuals had three capacities: 1. a judicious capacity; reason 2. a non-reasonable appetitive capacity 3. a non-balanced vegetative capacity The spirit in creatures had capacities (2) and (3); the spirit in plants had work (3) just

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Intellectual Virtues Characteristics that deliver magnificence in the sound capacity of the spirit (= reason ) are scholarly ideals . There are two scholarly temperances: 1. Hypothetical insight : perfection in picking up, finding, learning information. 2. Functional astuteness : greatness in the commonsense utilization of learning. That is: knowing how to apply or use practically speaking the information that hypothetical astuteness has empowered us to learn. Our reason is working getting it done when we have both hypothetical knowledge and useful astuteness .

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Intellectual versus Moral Virtues One of the elements of reason is to direct and control the non-sane appetitive and vegetative elements of the spirit. Reason ought to direct and control to the degree it would; it be able to can\'t control processing for instance. At the point when reason works well to coordinate the non-sane appetitive and vegetative elements of the spirit, it advances moral righteousness. Moral Virtues : qualities that create magnificence in the non-sound elements of the spirit.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Moral Virtues Moral excellencies include: Pride Courage Temperance Truthfulness Friendliness Magnificence Justice … and so on

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Virtues: Summary

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics Developing Virtue How would we build up our ideals? Scholarly excellencies : on the grounds that they are limits of reason, can be instructed . Moral ideals : on the grounds that they are propensities and manners of character, must be procured by practice . To wind up a liberal individual, we should perform or rehearse liberal acts. To end up a valiant individual, we should perform or rehearse fearless acts.

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Golden Mean How would we know what acts are "great" practice for us? What acts, on the off chance that we hone them diligently, will build up our ethical excellencies? Aristotle\'s reply: we ought to act in understanding to the " brilliant mean ." Virtue is dependably a mean between two extremes: a bad habit of inadequacy a bad habit of overabundance

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Golden Mean

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Golden Mean

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Aristotle\'s Virtue Ethics The Golden Mean But how would you figure out what the brilliant mean is in a specific circumstance? Aristole\'s answer is indistinct, yet he is by all accounts saying we need to take into every one of the truths of the p

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