Cruising .


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Terminology. . Essential Terms. Essential Sailboat Terms Rudder: A spade-like article at the back of the watercraft that controls the pontoon by diversion of the water. Tiller: The lever that controls the rudder. Winches: A mechanical gadget used to build pulling force on a line. (buy) Fairleads: Eyes or obstructs that rules in a coveted bearing. Normally they are utilized for jibsheets. Gooseneck: The fitt
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Slide 1

Cruising – A Beginners Guide A free online learners\' guide Adapted from www.baysail.com/keelboat By Spinnaker Sailing Schools, San Francisco, CA

Slide 2

Nomenclature

Slide 3

Basic Terms Basic Sailboat Terms Rudder: A spade-like protest at the back of the watercraft that controls the vessel by redirection of the water. Tiller: The lever that controls the rudder. Winches: A mechanical gadget used to expand pulling power on a line. (buy) Fairleads: Eyes or obstructs that rules in a craved bearing. Typically they are utilized for jibsheets. Gooseneck: The fitting that associates the blast to the pole. It works like a swivel permitting the blast to climb and down and swing from side to side. Bottom: The weighted blade at the base of the watercraft that keeps the pontoon from slipping sideways through the water. Bow: Front end of the vessel. Stanchions: Vertical posts that hold life savers set up. Podium: Safety rail at the bow of the watercraft. Stern: Back end of the watercraft. Port: The left half of the pontoon when confronting forward. Starboard: The right half of the pontoon when confronting forward.

Slide 4

Basic Rigging Basic Standing Rigging Mast: The expansive vertical fight that backings the sail and blast. Blast: The level fight used to hold and broaden the foot of the fundamental sail. Forestay: The wire (link) that backings the pole from the bow and keeps the highest point of the pole from moving toward the back. Backstay: The wire that backings the pole from the stern and keeps the highest point of it from pushing ahead. Covers: The wires that bolster the pole from the sides and keep it from moving athwartships. (sideways) Turnbuckle: Device for modifying strain on covers and remains. Chainplate: Fitting that associates covers to structure. Tang: Fitting that associates covers to pole.

Slide 5

Basic Running Rigging Basic Running Rigging Halyards: Lines or wire rope used to raise the sails. Sheets: Lines used to control the sails. Trimming is fixing the sheet to move the sail towards the centerline of the vessel and backing off giving it a chance to out. Outhaul: Line used to fix or pressure the foot ~ottom edge) of the sail. Downhaul: Line used to fix or pressure the luff (forward edge) of the sail. Blast Vang: Line used to pull the blast down. It keeps the blast from lifting which causes the top part of the sail to bend. Topping Lift: Holds the end of the blast up and keeps it from falling into the cockpit when the principle sail is brought down.

Slide 6

Drawing of Rigging

Slide 7

Basic Sail Terms Basic Sail Terms ( TERMS APPLYING TO BOTH MAIN AND JIB SAILS) Head: Top corner. (Where halyard associates with sail) Tack: Bottom forward corner. Clew: Bottom back corner. Luff: Forward edge. Foot: Bottom edge. Siphon: Backedge. Cringle: Metal support ring.

Slide 8

Main Sail TERMS THAT USUALLY APPLY TO MAIN SAILS Battens: Wood or plastic strips that go about as stiffeners for the sail. They keep the parasite from vacillating. Secure Pockets: Pockets sewn into the trailing edge of the sail to hold the boards. Cockroach: The unmeasured Sail region along the back edge of the Sail. Cunningham: The cringle (grommet) on the luff of the sail used to accomplish luff pressure for draft control. (cruise molding) Reef Points: The column of focuses where the reef ties (gaskets) are connected to the sail.

Slide 9

Wind graph

Slide 10

Sailing Terms Underway SAILING TERMS UNDERWAY The accompanying six terms are purposes of sail: Close Hauled: Sailing as near the twist as would be prudent. (directing) Close Reach: Sailing between close pulled and pillar reach. Pillar Reach: Sailing so that the twist is on the shaft. (900) Broad Reach: Sailing so that the twist is behind the bar. Running: Sailing so that the wind is straightforwardly toward the back. The jib and fundamental sails will be on inverse sides. (wing and wing) By the Lee: Sailing so that the twist is on an indistinguishable side from where the fundamental is conveyed. Whenever running, this could happen if there is a twist move to the side of the watercraft where the primary is. Cruising by the lee is disheartened in light of the fact that it could bring about an inadvertent Gybe.

Slide 11

Sailing Terms Underway Tacking: Turning the bow of the pontoon through the eye of the wind. Gybing: Turning the stern of the pontoon through the eye of the wind. Luffing: The rippling of a Sail when a vessel is directed excessively close toward the wind or the sail is dialed down too far. In Irons: The condition when the watercraft is pointed specifically into the twist without steerageway. Windward: The bearing from which the wind is coming. Starboard Tack: When the starboard side of the pontoon is windward. Port Tack: When the port side of the watercraft is windward. Leeward: The course to which the wind is going. Head Up: Turning the bow of the vessel towards the eye of the wind. Bearing Away: Turning the bow of the vessel far from the eye of the twist, likewise alluded to as bearing off or tumbling off Helms-A-Lee: Notification that the tiller has been put to leeward to bring about the pontoon to occur. (attaching

Slide 12

Additional Sailing Terms Trim: To pull in... as in trim a sheet. (line) Ease: To let out... as in facilitate a sheet. (line) Overtrim: A condition where the sail is trimmed in too firmly for the wind heading. Undertrim: A condition where the sail is trimmed too freely for the wind bearing. The Sail will luff if undertrimmed more than a slight sum. Beat: Sailing to windward by method for a Series of tacks. Reefing: Reducing the zone of a sail because of solid wind. Genuine Wind: The wind speed and bearing as observed by a stationary eyewitness. Obvious Wind: The wind speed and bearing as observed by an eyewitness who is moving over the water. Climate Helm: The propensity of a sailboat to head into the wind if the steerage is discharged. (relinquishing the tiller) Lee Helm: The propensity of a sailboat to head far from the wind if the steerage is discharged. Header: Change in wind bearing towards the bow of the pontoon. Lift: Change in wind heading towards the stern of the pontoon. A header for a vessel on port tack is a lift for a watercraft on starboard tack. Pillar: The most stretched out area of a vessel, by and large over the center. Abeam: The heading to either side of the watercraft. (900 from the bow) Underway: When the vessel is neither at stay, made quick or on solid land. No chance: When the watercraft is halted.

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