Driven Drivers .


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2. Subjects. What is a LED Driver?Drive TechniquesConstant voltage versus steady currentClass 1 versus Class 2EfficiencyLife ExpectancyAdditional
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Slide 1

Driven Drivers Al Marble Manager, Sales & Market Development January 2010

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Topics What is a LED Driver? Drive Techniques Constant voltage versus consistent current Class 1 versus Class 2 Efficiency Life Expectancy Additional "Components" Dimming Power Factor Size/wattage Protection (warm, natural) The Future Adjustable drive flow Feedback (warm/optical) Software highlights Communication and Control

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What is a LED Driver? Driver = The "counterweight" for a LED framework Transforms framework voltage (e.g., 120, 240, 277Vac) Fundamental reason : drive the LED array at a particular voltage/flow Proper momentum/voltage/control basic for light levels and life Regulates energy to counter framework variances Isolate the LED framework from the high voltage to decrease stun risk and increment wellbeing

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120vac Driver Constant Voltage 24VDC + 80mA 24VDC driver 100 watts (max) Connect incremental sections up to max control rating Current Limiter Current Limiter _

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Constant Voltage When Used When adaptability is required in including incremental LED fragments Historically utilized with low power LEDs (well under 1W each) Advantages Flexible Disadvantage Losses in ebb and flow limiters

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120vac Driver Low Voltage, Constant Current + 350mA 350 mA driver 10 watts (max) Secondary "buoys" to what is associated with driver 1 LED = 3.5V (1.2W) 2 LED = 7.0V (2.4W) 8 LED = 28.0V (9.6W) _

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120vac Driver Low Voltage, Constant Current + 700mA 700 mA driver 20 watts (max) Secondary "buoys" to what is associated with driver 1 LED = 3.5V (2.4W) 2 LED = 7.0V (4.8W) 8 LED = 28.0V (19.2W) _

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Low Voltage, Constant Current When Used Small number of LEDs Advantages Inherently vitality effective Disadvantage Clumsy with expansive number of LEDs

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350mA 120vac Driver Low Voltage, Constant Current + 700mA 700 mA driver 20 watts (max) Like "two 350mA drivers in one" _

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1.05A 350mA 120vac Driver Low Voltage, Constant Current + 1050 mA driver 30 watts (max) Like "three 350mA drivers in one" _

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120vac Driver High Voltage, Constant Current + 350mA 350 mA driver 150 watts (max) Secondary "buoys" to what is associated with driver 20 LED = 70V (24W) 30 LED = 105V (36W) 120 LED = 420V (144W) _

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High Voltage, Constant Current When Used High number of LEDs Advantages Inherently vitality proficient Disadvantage UL contemplations in luminaire outline

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Constant Voltage versus Consistent Current All things being equivalent, steady ebb and flow is superior to consistent voltage because of characteristic vitality effectiveness

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UL Class 2 UL Class 2 rating speaks to consistence with standard UL1310 UL Class 2 rating implies yield is viewed as sheltered to contact and no significant security insurance is required at LED/luminaire level UL Class 2 has the accompanying electrical confinements: Maximum yield ebb and flow: 5Adc Maximum yield voltage: 60Vdc (dry); 30Vdc (sodden/wet) Maximum yield control: 100W Any LED Driver utilized for Signage applications must be recorded in the UL Sign Components Manual As segment of a LED framework, a LED Driver is not recorded but rather perceived by UL ( )

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UL Class 1 LED Drivers with yield outside the range required by UL1310 (Class 2) need to agree to standard UL1012 Under this standard, LED Drivers are viewed as UL Class 1 gadgets A LED Driver with UL Class 1 rating implies its yield is viewed as "high voltage" and wellbeing assurance is required inside the apparatus Fluorescent and HID weight fall under this classification Also as a part of a LED framework, a Class I LED Driver is not recorded but rather perceived by UL ( )

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Class 1 versus Class 2 Class 2 Easier to oblige in installation outline Simpler UL handle Electrical confinements constrain number of LEDs per driver Class 1 Allows bigger quantities of LEDs per driver Potential for more noteworthy driver effectiveness (because of high voltage, low ebb and flow) Added insurance fundamental in apparatus UL prepare not surely knew in respect to LEDs

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Class 1 versus Class 2 Expect propensity towards Class 1 because of: Economies of running bigger number of LEDs Potential for more noteworthy driver efficiencies

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Driver Efficiency Same issue as weights Typical efficiencies 80-85% for low voltage frameworks Class 1 bears new productivity increases High voltage (and thus low ebb and flow) Losses identified with momentum, so lower ebb and flow implies bring down misfortunes 15W of warmth 165W @ 120vac 150W @ 350ma % Losses = Losses/Input Watts = 15W/165W = 10% 90% Efficiency

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Life Expectancy 50,000 hr future normal for drivers (matches 50,000 hr helpful existence of most LED frameworks) Lots of talk/solicitations for expanded life Yes, longer life can sensibly be normal when working at lower temperatures Key : Analysis must be done at the luminaire/framework level More to the framework than just drivers and LEDs Full scope of outer factors must be viewed as Evaluation of individual segments misses an excessive number of subtle elements Worthy On-Going Topic : System level examination to comprehend and conceivably increment life appraisals, continuing conservatively

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Current Dimming Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) versus Plentifulness Modulation Dim beneath 5-10% No shading shift Higher productivity Lower cost Dimming Control Standard 0-10v control will be basic for business Line voltage control vital for private Triac-style dimmers: Some work to be done to make basic for SSL

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A Few Other Driver "Highlights" Power Factor… ..Greater than 90% With coming of electronic counterweights, this has turned into a non-issue Size/Wattage Current drivers on market around 150-200W Some luminaire makers utilize 2 for each apparatus Larger wattages required? Driven viability upgrades after some time may nullify require

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A Few Other Driver "Highlights" Thermal Protection Most utilize regular warm defenders (TP) which open when driver overheats New technique now developing: Thermal foldback Reduce drive ebb and flow as driver detects overheating Environmental Protection IP66 turning into a typical rating (really hearty) Still require an electrical walled in area and full assurance from components

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Future Driver Features? Movable drive flow Sensing component on LED load up that advises driver to work at certain momentum Flexibility and forward similarity Thermal Feedback Sensing component inside installation to advise driver to lessen ebb and flow Optical Feedback Measure light and modify after some time, or to change in accordance with coveted shading blending levels Software/Control/Communication

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