Hazard Administration in Cruising.


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To get mariners pondering how dangerous cruising is. To distinguish the real hazard variables in ... Paddling (0.12) Riding a bicycle (0.09) Riding a PWC (0.06) Walking to ...
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Slide 1

Hazard Management in Sailing Prof. Paul H. Mill operator, D.Eng., P.E. Maritime Architecture Program United States Naval Academy Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Goals To get mariners contemplating how unsafe cruising is To distinguish the significant danger variables in cruising To survey hazard and oversee it To thoroughly consider a danger administration situation Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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What is Bad Risk Management? Letting something shock you since you were not arranged! Wellbeing at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Another Bad Example! Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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And Another! Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Riding in an auto (30) SCUBA jumping (2) Flying in a little plane or business flying (1 or 0.04) Cheerleading (0.4) Canoeing (0.12) Riding a bicycle (0.09) Riding a PWC (0.06) Walking to work (0.025) Riding the Bus(0.02) Riding a Ferry (0.01) Riding a Train (0.01) Riding a Horse (0.01) Cabin speedboats (0.0002) Sailing is less hazardous than… And is more unsafe than… "Sea Racing" is 0.35 (UK) How Risky Is Sailing*? *All sorts, as reported in CDC and USCG measurements (2001-2002) Sailing Risk is 0.03 fatalities for each 100,000 members standardized to normal hours of support per member Note: take these, similar to all, insights with a grain of salt! Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Injuries to Fatalities Ratio (needing proficient restorative support) Football = 65,000 wounds/casualty Golf = 33,000 Sailing = 200 Caving/Rock Climbing = 16 Aviation = 2 Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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What is "Danger"? It is plainly connected with both the probability of the occasion happening, And the seriousness of the outcome Risk = Probability of Occurrence X Cost of Event\'s Occurrence A basic illustration: Which conveys more hazard? A broken secure or a broken rudder? Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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The Supreme Court noticed that, "all exercises have hazard… safe does not mean the nonattendance of danger." Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Current Risk Philosophy If the casualty rate is more prominent than 1/100,000 Or, the expense is more noteworthy than about $5,000 Then insurance agencies trust it is "dangerous" and require unique strategies or premiums. "Society" has comparable qualities, yet yours might be distinctive! Cruising is a hazy area! Wellbeing at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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What is "Security"? The Reduction of Risk by either lessening the probability of event or the expense of result. Illustrations: Avoiding stormy areas (lower loads) Redundancy (saves) Choosing the right time to reef Inspecting your apparatus Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Everyday Risk Do you view yourself as a "daring person"? The "state of mind element"! Skydiver? Cruiser rider? Smoker? Mobile phone client? Cross the way of a dark feline? Most Folks "Excessively Cautious" "Excessively Risky" Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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How Much Risk Will You (Personally!) Accept? Is it accurate to say that this is your satisfactory level? Chance Or, is it accurate to say that this is? Hazard Mitigators Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Risk Mitigators in Sailing Boating Education Boating Experience Preparation (gear condition and aptitude) Attitude Most mitigators spotlight on the team, not the hardware as 89% of recreational marine mishaps are administrator mistake! Wellbeing at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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More USCG Statistics Boating Education Boaters who took a sculling training class in the most recent three years were 466 times less inclined to be included in a mischance! Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Boating Experience Boaters with under 100 hours experience were twice as prone to have a mischance as those with 100-500 hours and were 30,000 times more inclined to have a mishap than those with more noteworthy than 500 hours! A normal (US) boater amasses around 240 hours for every year. (MD is around 150 hours.) Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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The Big 5 Risks in Sailing Requiring Medical Attention (USCG 2001) Collision 62% Grounding 9% Capsize 8% Fall Overboard 4% Fire 4% Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Four Steps to Managing Risk Assess Overall Risk Assess Increased Risk Identify Risk versus Reward Reduce or Accept Risk Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Basic Sailing Risk A pleasant light to direct winds Water above 60 degrees Boat in great condition Regular team Local zone Equals LOW RISK! Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Increased Risks Heavy Weather Crew (experience, commonality with watercraft and each other, physical condition) Equipment (have it, it works, and the team knows how to utilize it) Racing (pushing the farthest point) "Return home itis" Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Example Risk Management Case Beer Can Race in Annapolis in August Winds ~6 kts, ~80 deg Doublehanded TS cautioning TS cell seen drawing nearer PFDs put on Safety at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Example Risk Management Case Jib and mizzen dropped, fundamental reefed Other pontoons dropped sails, utilized OB, headed in Hove-to through 50-72 tie breeze Resumed race & won! Seen grounded water crafts in transit in. Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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An Exercise in Risk Mgt! In light of a genuine story. The names have been changed… First race/second sail of the season (mid-April) (first sail in 5 kts) Forecast from day before is for 10-15 with gradually falling temp, shady and wind heading off to the NW from NE First doublehanded race! Group arrives and grumbles about headache Assess and Manage? Wellbeing at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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An Exercise in Risk Mgt! Touch base toward the begin. Wind is 13-16. Radio and PDAs inop. Pick #3 because of dependability & perceivability. Around leeward check the starboard jib lead breaks. Rapidly tacks. Jib Change to #1? Survey and Manage? Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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An Exercise in Risk Mgt! PFD on, #1 goes up, group back on rail. Coming in on port layline… "Starboard!" Quick tack & sprinkle! Courageous recuperation. Group goes beneath to change. Survey and Manage? Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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Final Thoughts Sailing does not need to be exceptionally dangerous. Cruising dangers can change quickly and must be continually surveyed. Realize that crashes, establishing, overturning, falling over the edge and flames are the most widely recognized issues. Training and Experience (& practice!) are solid mitigators of danger. Security at Sea 2004 27-28 March, Annapolis, MD

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