Hopewell Society National Verifiable Park.


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Hopewell Society National Verifiable Park five archeological locales over 2,000 years of age more than 1,200 sections of land aggregate How well do you know Hopewell Society? Hopewell Society Trivia Honey bee National Park Administration, U.S. Bureau of the Inside Hopewell Society National Authentic Park
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Hopewell Culture National Historical Park

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five archeological destinations over 2,000 years of age more than 1,200 sections of land aggregate How well do you know Hopewell Culture?

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Hopewell Culture Trivia Bee National Park Service, U.S. Branch of the Interior Hopewell Culture National Historical Park 16062 State Route 104 Chillicothe, Ohio 45601-8694 (740) 774-1126 Version 1.0 – March 2007

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Click any number somewhere around 1 and 50 that has not been addressed accurately as of now 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Notes Hopewell Culture Trivia Bee Replay Introduction

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Uh, not a chance. Next Contestant? Next Question?

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Ya beyond any doubt, you betcha. Next Question?

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Q1 Where did the Hopewell individuals get their name? From a sort of stone they used to make lance focuses From a nearby homestead where antiquities were found From confirmation that they were hopeful and amicable

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Yes. A1 The Hopewell are named for a ranch once possessed by Captain Mordecai Cloud Hopewell, a Confederate veteran of the Civil War. A large number ancient rarities were uncovered at Hopewell’s cultivate particularly for showcase at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1892. Right up \'til today, since they deserted no records or composed dialect, we don\'t know by what name the Hopewell called themselves. Next Question?

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Q2 What year did Mound City Group National Monument get to be Hopewell Culture National Historical Park? 1972 1982 1992

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Yes. A2 Hopewell Culture NHP was set up May 27, 1992 by a government law that renamed Mound City Group National Monument, extended the Hopeton Earthworks and approved the obtaining of three extra destinations – High Bank Works, Hopewell Mound Group and Seip Earthworks. Next Question?

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Q3 What sorts of instruments did the Hopewell utilization to construct hills? Bushel, shells and sticks Shovels, steeds and trucks Heavy ropes and pulleys

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Yes. A3 The Hopewell made their amazing earthworks totally by hand with just a couple of little devices that they likewise planned and made by hand. They didn\'t have scoops, stallions or trucks equipped with wheels to make their work any less demanding or more proficient for them. Next Question?

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Q4 According to one oral custom, which indigenous gathering assembled the hills? Delaware Lenni Lenape Alligewi

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Yes. A4 The convention of the Lenni Lenape, or Delaware, states that their actual beginnings were in the west and that when they traversed the Mississippi they vanquished a relentless individuals who had been the immense\'s manufacturers hills. This gathering, known as the Alligewi, or Tallidewi, gave their name to what we call the Allegheny River. Source: People of the Mounds: Ohio’s Hopewell Culture by Bradley T. Lepper (Hopewell Culture National Historical Park and Eastern National Park and Monument Association, 1995) Next Question?

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Q5 What’s the greatest political qualification between Hopewell earthworks and the landmarks of Egypt? Egyptians landmarks were constructed by slave work Hopewell youngsters could procure the privilege to vote The pyramids weren’t available to basic individuals

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Yes. A5 All of the exertion that went into developing the Middle\'s earthworks Woodland period seems to have been given at the assent of its kin. “Although the Hopewell most likely had pioneers of some impressive power and impact there is no confirmation, for example, predictable examples in internment hones, that their pioneers acquired political force after the way of lords or pharaohs.” Source: People of the Mounds: Ohio’s Hopewell Culture by Bradley T. Lepper (Hopewell Culture National Historical Park and Eastern National Park and Monument Association, 1995) Next Question?

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Q6 What year did it turn into an official infringement of park tenets to stroll on top of the earthworks at Mound City? 1956 1986 2006

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Yes. A6 Superintendent Ken Apschnikat issued a first abstract of requests for the recreation center in 1986. The hills and earth dividers were shut to pedestrian activity to anticipate disintegration. Recreational interests were limited to decrease potential for mishaps, to keep away from unsettling influences and “to protect the respect of an ancient entombment area.” Source: Amidst Ancient Monuments: The Administrative History of Mound City Group National Monument/Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Ohio by Ron Cockrell (National Park Service, 1999) Next Question?

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Q7 Of the five separate archeological locales saved as a feature of this national park, which is the most seasoned? Hopewell Mound Group Mound City Group Seip Earthworks

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Yes. A7 Based on distributed radiocarbon dates or relic typology, the request and inexact age of the park’s five archeological destinations are – Mound City Group (2,200-1,750 BP) Hopewell Mound Group (2,100-1,600 BP) High Bank Works (2,050-1,700 BP) Hopeton Works (2,000-1,850 BP) Seip Earthworks (1,800-1,600 BP) Source: Ohio Archeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures by Bradley T. Lepper (Voyageur Media Group, 2005) Next Question?

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Q8 What present day agrarian staple was enormously uncommon in Hopewell gardens? Beans Tobacco Corn

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Yes. A8 Corn, or maize, was initially a wild Mexican grass that came to fuel the immense human advancements of Mesoamerica. It was just once in a while developed in Hopewell gardens, be that as it may. One hypothesis, known as the “Maize Debate,” recommends that the move to an inactive, corn-based agrarian culture may have flagged the end of the Hopewell time. Source: People of the Mounds: Ohio’s Hopewell Culture by Bradley T. Lepper (Hopewell Culture National Historical Park and Eastern National Park and Monument Association, 1995) Next Question?

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Q9 What’s a Hopewell “Interaction Sphere?” A specialized name for their form of a soccer ball A separated, consecrated space for religious customs A locale inside which thoughts or items are traded

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Yes. A9 Interaction circles exist when free social orders trade products or data. For the Hopewell, it extended from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rocky Mountains and the Upper Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. They’re not only “trade networks” since little confirmation of traded artworks or materials from Ohio have been found in these removed spots. Source: Ohio Archeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures, by Bradley T. Lepper (Voyageur Media Group, 2005) Next Question?

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Q10 In 1990, this park had the questionable refinement of being the rearward in America to do what? Expel human stays from open showcase Adopt EPA pesticide control measures Commemorate veterans of World War I

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Yes. A10 Human fiery debris that had been shown in a cremation pit show in the recreation center exhibition hall were supplanted in 1990 with clean sand. After six years, in 1996, the recreation center shut a different show known as the “Mica Grave.” First developed in 1965, this building had permitted guests to view relics and articles inside Mound #13 just past the passage to the hill zone. Source: Amidst Ancient Monuments: The Administrative History of Mound City Group National Monument/Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Ohio by Ron Cockrell (National Park Service, 1999) Next Question?

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Q11 what number years back did seekers and pilgrims first start to settle this a piece of eastern North America? 2,500 11,500 6,500

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Yes. A11a While the Hopewell lived 2,000 years prior, the range was initially settled very nearly 10,000 years prior – “Ohio, specifically, more likely than not been a Paleoindian heaven. It was rich nation amid the end periods of the Ice Age. Nature was a mosaic of various types of woods and prairie, with a buffet of assets from upland forests of nut trees to wetlands loaded with waterfowl … Continued

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A11b “ … notwithstanding deer and beaver, there likewise were crowds of caribou and musk bulls, mastodons, mammoths and monster ground sloths, and predators, for example, the saber-tooth feline, the short face bear, wolves and mountain lions.” Source: Ohio Archeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures by Bradley T. Lepper (Voyageur Media Group, 2005) Next Question?

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Q12 What was the Hopewell’s best chasing apparatus? Bow & bolt A lance tossing gadget called “Atlatl” Deadly toxin blended from local plants

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Yes. A12a Since they lived numerous hundreds of years before the nearby appearance of the bow and bolt, the Hopewell utilized the lance and atlatl, affirmed at-ul-at-ul , a name got from the Aztecs of Central America. Working as an expansion of the hurler\'s arm, much like a flexing sling, the gadget moves a lance in an overhand or side movement with far more prominent power. … Continued

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A12b The most seasoned atlatls on the planet go back over 25,000 years to northwest Africa. Foreigners from Siberia likely conveyed the atlatl to North America around 12,000 years prior. Next Question?

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Q13 what number diverse times was this park focused for “disestablishment” while it was known as Mound City Group National Monument? 2 3 4

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Yes. A13 Prior to its extension and name change in 1992, the recreation center survived four separate endeavors to “disestablish” it either to help streamline the bigger organization or because of an apparent absence of importance. Inside Secretary Harold Ickes really sanct

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