Incorporating the 2008 Physical Movement Rules for American s and the Manual for Group Preventive Administrations into E.


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Wellbeing result parts: All-reason mortality, cardio-respiratory, ... Key Guidelines Adults (ages 18 64) Minimum high-impact action for wellbeing. 2 hours and 30 ...
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Incorporating the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for American s and the Guide to Community Preventive Services into Adventure Programs Judy Kruger, PhD U.S. Places for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity Physical Activity and Health Branch 5 th Annual Research and Evaluation of Adventure Programming (REAP) March 20, 2009 Atlanta, GA

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Objectives Why proof base? Talk about proof from 2008 Guidelines Identify proof from the Community Guide Identify potential procedures to incorporate into experience programs

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Why proof base? In light of what we KNOW… as opposed to what we THINK works Process of arranging, actualizing and assessing programs Individual & group pick up aptitudes/receive practices enhance physical environment

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What is confirmation = verification? Confirmation of a wellbeing impact Evidence of a project impact Evidence of system configuration & connection SOME activity required SPECIFIC system impact SPECIFIC conveyance impact

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Advantages Lead to productive utilization of assets Continuity & development of the project Common execution measures Supports quality change Helps set up organization Disadvantages Need to know where to discover proof Added cost as devices and procedure are new Program seems institutionalized rather than custom fitted May affect group purchase in Perceptions

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Common segments Specific target populace Specific, quantifiable objectives Proven advantages Defined system (structure, time span, thinking) Support (staffing aptitudes, office, hardware)

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Summary Evidence-based ideas incorporates: arranging, actualizing and assessing Many points of interest and impediments Multiple confirmation based segments to consider

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Resources CDC, Framework for system assessment in general wellbeing. MMWR. 1999 48 (RR-11): 1-40. CDC, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. www.cdc.gov/brfss RWJF, Active Living by Design – Case considers. www.activelivingbydesign.org

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QUIZ Evidence-based exploration incorporates the way toward arranging, actualizing and assessing programs adjusted from testing mediations with a specific end goal to address wellbeing issues at the individual and group level? A) True B) False

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QUIZ Which of the accompanying are seen points of interest of EB? A) Makes it less demanding to legitimize financing B) Facilitates spread of system C) Supports ceaseless quality change D) Helps to build up association E) All of the above

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QUIZ Which of the accompanying are regular segments of EB? A) Specific target populace B) Specific, quantifiable objectives C) Proven advantages D) An and B E) All of the above

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Overview of the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

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Scientifically settled advantages of physical action (PA) ↓ danger of passing on rashly ↓ danger of kicking the bucket from coronary illness ↓ danger of creating diabetes ↓ danger of growing hypertension Helps ↓ circulatory strain in individuals who as of now have hypertension ↓ danger of creating colon malignancy ↓ sentiments of sadness and nervousness Helps control weight Helps fabricate and keep up solid bones, muscles, and joints Promotes mental prosperity

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2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans First real survey of the science on advantages of physical action in over 10 years Complement past proposals Information and direction on the sorts and measure of physical action that give considerable medical advantages

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2005 Dietary Guidelines 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines www.health.gov/DietaryGuidelines www.health.gov/paguidelines

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3 Phases & Products Evidence audit (oversaw by CDC) Database Advisory board of trustees report (master panel) Federal Advisory Report Writing process (delegated board) 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

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CDC triaged 14,472 modified works CDC assessed 1,598 papers FACA created 650 page report HHS composing bunch made 65 page record 2008 Guidelines system Phase I Phase II Phase III

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Phase I Evidence Review Literature audit analyzed unique examination distributed since January 1995 Health result parts: All-cause mortality, cardio-respiratory, musculoskeletal, practical wellbeing, tumor, psychological well-being, antagonistic occasions, metabolic, & vitality equalization Stratified by age bunches Children and youth (6-18 years) Adults (19-64 years) Older grown-ups (65 + years)

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Initial exploration inquiries Is physical movement (PA) connected with the wellbeing result of interest [x]? What measurements of PA is connected with [x]? What level of PA force impacts [x]? Do distinctive modes (sorts) impact [x]?

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Physical Activity Abstraction Database

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Evidence table

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Direct connection to pdf

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Phase II Advisory Committee Report Utilized writing database to create accord on PA & wellbeing writing Health result parts: All-cause mortality, cardio-respiratory, musculoskeletal, useful wellbeing, tumor, psychological well-being, unfriendly occasions, metabolic, & vitality adjust Additional sections on understudied populaces Persons with handicaps Women amid pregnancy and the baby blues period Adults with chose perpetual conditions

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Phase II Advisory Committee William L. Haskell, Stanford University - Chair Miriam Nelson, Tufts University - Vice Chair Rod K. Dishman, University of Georgia Edward T. Howley, University of Tennessee Wendy Kohrt, University of Colorado William Kraus, Duke University I-Min Lee, Harvard University Anne McTiernan, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center Kenneth E. Powell, Atlanta Georgia Russell R. Pate, University of South Carolina Judy Regensteiner, University of Colorado James Rimmer, University of Illinois, Chicago Antronette Yancey, UCLA

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Phase II Advisory Committee Reviewed existing exploratory writing to distinguish adequate proof to build up a far reaching set of particular physical action suggestions

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Phase III Writing Committee

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Phase III Writing Process Strong dependence upon Advisory Committee Report Final item - 8 sections Fact sheet, toolboxs, PowerPoint presentation

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Children and Adolescents (ages 6-17) 60 minutes (a hour) or a greater amount of Aerobic physical movement that is in any event moderate: Most of the 1 or more hours a day ought to be either direct or overwhelming force PA Do lively power PA no less than 3 days a week Encourage interest in PA that are: Age fitting, charming, offer assortment

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Examples of moderate-force high-impact exercises Children Brisk walk, trekking Active entertainment (paddling) Adolescents Brisk walk, climbing Active amusement (kayaking) Yard work, for example, raking leaves/stowing leaves Softball, baseball that require getting and tossing

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Examples of enthusiastic power oxygen consuming exercises Children Active diversions ( tag - running and pursuing) Martial expressions (karate) Sports (soccer, hockey, ball, tennis) Adolescents Active recreations ( banner football - running and pursuing) Martial expressions (karate) Sports (soccer, hockey, b-ball, tennis) Vigorous moving

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Children and Adolescents proceeded As a feature of a hour of every day action to include: Muscle-fortifying : Include muscle-reinforcing physical action on no less than 3 days of the week Bone-fortifying : Include bone-fortifying physical action on no less than 3 days of the week

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Examples of muscle reinforcing exercises Children Games (pull of-war) or climbing (ropes or play-ground) Resistance works out (body weight or resistance groups) Ropes, tree climb, swinging on bars/gear Adolescents Climbing (pull-ups, push-ups) Resistance practices utilizing hand-held weights or weight machines Swinging on bars/hardware, rope or tree

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Examples of bone reinforcing exercises Children Games (hopscotch) Jumping rope Gymnastics, b-ball, volleyball Adolescents Running Hopping, skipping, bouncing Jumping rope Gymnastics, b-ball, volleyball

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Principle = F I T F – Frequency I – Intensity T – Time/Duration 2008 Guideline = least F – Daily I – Moderate or Vigorous T – a hour Youth high-impact physical action standard

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Muscle fortifying 3 days for each week Bone fortifying 3 days for each week Muscle & bone fortifying standards As a component of the day by day a hour to include:

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Key Guidelines – Adults (ages 18 – 64) Minimum high-impact action for wellbeing 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes/week) moderate-power high-impact action; or 1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes/week) vivacious force high-impact action; or Equal mix for 150 minutes/week Muscle-fortifying exercises that include all real muscle gatherings ought to be performed on 2 or more days of the week

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Key Guidelines – Adults proceeded For extra medical advantages 5 hours (300 minutes) moderate-power high-impact action a week; or 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) fiery force high-impact action a week; or An equal mix (150 minutes)

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Key Guidelines – Older grown-ups (ages 64+) The key rules for grown-ups apply to more seasoned grown-ups with extra qualifying rules: Guideline for grown-ups who can\'t do 150 minutes/week Balance practice Only utilize relative power to decide the level of exertion

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Principle = F I T F – Frequency I – Intensity T – Time/Duration 2008 Guideline = least F – Weekly I – Moderate or Vigorous T – 150 minutes/week Adult high-impact physical action rule

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Flexibility in meeting insignificant high-impact 2008 Guideline Intensity Duration Frequency Moderate

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