Maximizing so as to minimize Goes Softens up Round Robin Competition Plans.


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Maximizing so as to minimize Goes Softens up Round Robin Competition Plans Celso RIBEIRO UFF and PUC-Rio, Brazil Sebastián URRUTIA PUC-Rio, Brazil Outline Inspiration Competition plans and the voyaging competition issue
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Maximizing so as to minimize Travels Breaks in Round Robin Tournament Schedules Celso RIBEIRO UFF and PUC-Rio, Brazil Sebastiã¡n URRUTIA PUC-Rio, Brazil Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Summary Motivation Tournament calendars and the voyaging competition issue Connecting breaks with separations Maximum number of breaks for SRR competitions Polygon strategy Maximum number of breaks for TTP-compelled MDRR competitions Numerical results Maximizing so as to con comments Minimizing goes breaks

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Motivation for this work: Context: examination bunch on utilizations of OR methods to issues in games administration and booking Effective calculations for the Traveling Tournament Problem: the aggregate separation voyaged is a vital variable to be minimized in competition planning, to diminish flying out expenses and to give more opportunity to the players for resting and preparing. Genuine application: discovering a decent calendar to the Brazilian national soccer title (26 groups) Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament timetables Conditions: n (even) groups participate in a competition. Every group has its own stadium at its home city. Every group is situated at its home city before all else, to where it returns toward the end. Separations between the stadiums are known. A group playing two back to back away recreations goes straightforwardly from one city to the next, without coming back to its home city. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament timetables Conditions (cont’d): Single round-robin competition (SRR): Each cooperative efforts each other group precisely once in n-1 prescheduled rounds. Twofold round-robin competition (DRR): Each cooperative efforts each other group precisely twice in 2(n-1) prescheduled rounds (each of them with precisely n/2 diversions), once at home and once away. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament timetables Conditions (cont’d): Mirrored twofold round-robin competition (MDRR): Each joint efforts each other group precisely twice in 2(n-1) prescheduled rounds (each of them with precisely n/2 recreations), once at home and once away. MDRR is a SRR competition in the first (n-1) rounds, trailed by the same SRR competition with turned around venues in the keep going (n-1) rounds. A competition timetable decides at which round and in which stadium every amusement happens. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament calendars Home-away example (HAP): Matrix with the same number of lines as groups (n) and the same number of segments as rounds in the competition. Every column of a HAP is an arrangement of H’s and A’s. A H (resp. An) in position r of column t implies that group t has a home (resp. an away) amusement in round r. A group has a break in round r in the event that it has two back to back home (or away) amusements in rounds r-1 and r. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament calendars Schedule S: B(S) = aggregate number of breaks (whole of the quantity of breaks over all groups in the competition) There are no two equivalent columns in a HAP (each two groups need to play against one another at some round) Number of home splits = number of away breaks = B(S)/2 D(S) = aggregate separation voyaged (total of the separations went by all groups in the competition) T(S) = aggregate number of ventures (number of times any group must go starting with one stadium then onto the next) Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament timetables Breaks minimization issues: Schedules with a base number of breaks De Werra (1981,1988): limitations on topographical areas (reciprocal HAPs for groups in the same area, e.g. Mets and Yankees in NY), groups sorted out in divisions (weekday versus weekend amusements), minimize the quantity of rounds with breaks Minimize breaks when the request of diversions is settled Elf, Junger & Rinaldi (2003) Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament timetables Distance minimization issues: NHL calendar: minimize the aggregate separation voyaged (developmental tabu inquiry) - Costa (1995) Traveling competition issue: minimize the aggregate separation voyaged, such that no cooperative efforts more than three back to back away recreations or three continuous home recreations - Easton, Nemhauser & Trick (2001,2004) Mirrored TTP: Ribeiro & Urrutia (2004) intricacy? Open! Difficult issue: past biggest occasion precisely understood to date had just n=6 groups! (n=8 with 20 processors in 4 days CPU time) Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Tournament plans In this work: Connection in the middle of breaks and separation issues New class of cases for which remove minimization is proportional to breaks augmentation Construction of timetables with most extreme number of breaks and least separation voyaged Mirrored DRR calendars fulfilling TTP contraints Solution of bigger TTP occasions Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Variants: no-repeaters no synchronized rounds numerous recreations (more than two, variable) groups with reciprocal examples in the same city pre-booked amusements and TV imperatives stadium accessibility minimize airfare and lodging expenses , and so forth. Competition timetables Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Connecting breaks with separations Benchmark occurrences for separation minimization issues: Structured roundabout examples with n = 4 to 20 groups MLB cases with n = 4 to 16 groups All accessible from Michael Trick’s website page 2003 release of the Brazilian national soccer title with 24 groups Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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goes to play the first diversion goes in the wake of playing the last amusement goes to play in go-between rounds if all groups were to travel, marked down by the quantity of groups that don\'t travel (home breaks) Connecting breaks with separations New uniform occasions: all separations equivalent to one D(S) = T(S) R = number of rounds T(S) = n/2 + n(R-1) – B(S)/2 + n/2 = nR – B(S)/2 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Connecting breaks with separations In the specific instance of a uniform case: D(S) = T(S) Then, D(S) = nR – B(S)/2 augment breaks => minimize voyages => => minimize separation went for uniform cases Motivation: UB to breaks offers LB to separation Consequence: suggestions in the arrangement of the TTP Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Max breaks for SRR competitions SRR competitions: greatest number of breaks for any group is (n-2): every single home amusement or every single away diversion Only two groups may have (n-2) breaks: all recreations away and all amusements at home Remaining (n-2) groups: at most (n-3) breaks every Upper bound to the quantity of breaks: UB SRR = 2(n-2) + (n-2)(n-3) = n 2 – 3n + 2 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon technique Upper bound to the quantity of breaks: UB SRR = 2(n-2) + (n-2)(n-3) = n 2 – 3n + 2 UB SRR bound is tight. We utilize the polygon (or circle) strategy to assemble a timetable with precisely UB SRR breaks. Stage 1 : allocate recreations to adjusts Graph with one edge for every diversion at every round Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon strategy 6 Example: “polygon method” for n=6 1 5 2 1 st round Phase 1: amusement task 3 4 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon system 6 Example: “polygon method” for n=6 5 4 1 2 nd round Phase 1: diversion task 2 3 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon technique 6 Example: “polygon method” for n=6 4 3 5 3 rd round Phase 1: amusement task 1 2 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon system 6 Example: “polygon method” for n=6 3 2 4 th round Phase 1: amusement task 5 1 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon technique 6 Example: “polygon method” for n=6 2 1 3 5 th round Phase 1: diversion task 4 5 Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon system Phase 2 : expansion of the polygon system an introduction to every edge (arranged edge shading) Edge associating hubs 1 and n is constantly situated from 1 to n (in each round) k=2,...,n/2: the edge joining hubs k and n+1-k is situated from the even (resp. odd) numbered hub to the odd (resp. indeed) numbered hub in odd (resp. indeed) adjusts Final furthest point of every circular segment is the home group. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Polygon strategy Phase 2: stadium task Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Max breaks for TTP-compelled MDRR competitions Similar tight limits can likewise be gotten for equilibrated SRR, DRR, and MDRR competitions. Reflected DRR competitions in which every calendar must take after the same imperatives of the voyaging competition issue: No group can play more than three sequential home amusements or more than three back to back away diversions. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Max breaks for TTP-obliged MDRR competitions Upper limits to the quantity of breaks can be inferred utilizing comparative (albeit a great deal more explained) maximizing so as to tally contentions: Minimizing goes breaks

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Max breaks for TTP-compelled MDRR competitions Since T(S) = 2n(n-1) – B(S)/2, the upper bound UB TTP can be utilized as a part of the calculation of lower limits to T(S) and, for the uniform examples, likewise to D(S) = T(S). Conversely to the past issues, a development technique to fabricate plans for TTP-compelled MDRR competitions with precisely UB TTP breaks does not appear to exist to date. Maximizing so as to minimize goes breaks

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Max breaks for TTP-obliged MDRR competitions Use a compelling TTP heuristic to discover great rough arrangements (10 minutes): Ribeiro & Urrutia (2004): better arrangements in 10 minutes of CPU for benchmark examples than Anagnostopoulos, Michel, Van Hentenryck

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