Most recent Advancements in Pre-adult Social insurance:.


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In spite of rules, current conveyance of preventive administrations underneath ... the Adolescent Health Screening Questionnaire to demonstrate wellbeing conduct of the ...
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Most recent Developments in Adolescent Health Care Mark G. Martens, M.D. VP and Chief Medical Officer Planned Parenthood of Arkansas and Eastern Oklahoma Research Center Professor Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology The University of Oklahoma-Tulsa President-International Infectious Disease Society for Obstetricians and Gynecologists

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BACKGROUND Majority of juvenile grimness/mortality is preventable

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Leading Causes of Mortality in Adolescents Ages 10-19

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MORBIDITY/MORTALITY Accidents and wounds driving reason for death for both guys and females Many of these mischances include liquor and different substances

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MORBIDITY/MORTALITY Sexually transmitted maladies are basic irresistible sicknesses among youths Among young people ages 15-19, pregnancy and labor are the main sources of hospitalization

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BACKGROUND Risky practices co-happen Behaviors in charge of driving reasons for bleakness/mortality amid adulthood are started amid second decade of life (e.g., smoking, substance use, physical inertia, unsafe sexual conduct)

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PROMOTE ADOLESCENT HEALTH Requires investment of Adolescents Families Schools Communities Federal, state & group strategies

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PROMOTE ADOLESCENT Health care framework Most teenagers see an essential consideration supplier at any rate once every year

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ADOLESCENT CLINICAL GUIDELINES Recommend that essential consideration suppliers screen & counsel pre-adult patients for dangerous wellbeing practices

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ADOLESCENT CLINICAL GUIDELINES National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Guidelines (HEDIS) have Adolescent-Specific Measures: Screening for liquor use Annual visit to supplier Immunization status Screening sexually dynamic females for Chlamydia trachomatis (Over 15 years of age)

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ADOLESCENT CLINICAL GUIDELINES Despite rules, ebb and flow conveyance of preventive administrations beneath prescribed levels Limited exploration on the most proficient method to actualize immature preventive administrations

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RISK AREAS Risky practices connected with real dreariness and mortality in puberty: Tobacco Alcohol Drugs Sexual Behavior Seatbelt Helmet

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SEXUAL BEHAVIOR Increase condom use Delay onset SUBSTANCE USE Decrease start Decrease use TOBACCO Decrease start Decrease smoking SEATBELTS Increase safety belt use HELMETS Increase protective cap use SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION OF PREVENTIVE SERVICES Increased Screening Increased Counseling INCREASE PREVENTIVE SERVICES TO ADOLESCENTS

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GOAL Develop and assess a framework mediation to build the conveyance of pre-adult clinical preventive administrations

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SYSTEM INTERVENTION TO INCREASE DELIVERY OF CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES CURRENT DELIVERY OF PREVENTIVE SERVICES IMPROVED DELIVERY OF PREVENTIVE SERVICES Provider Training Tools Health Educator

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TRAINING 8-Hour Training for Pediatric Primary Care Providers Adolescent Health and Development Effective Communication with Adolescents Give Clinicians Targeted Specific Messages about Risk Behaviors

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TOOLS Adolescent Health Screening Questionnaire Provider Charting Form Provides data from the Adolescent Health Screening Questionnaire to demonstrate wellbeing conduct of the patients Provides prompts and signs for supplier intercession

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GUIDELINES FOR PROVIDER INTERVENTION Not Engaging in Risky Behavior Reinforce constructive practices

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GUIDELINES FOR PROVIDER INTERVENTION Engaging in Risky Behavior Confirm reaction Express worry about hazardous conduct Provide key messages

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KEY MESSAGES Key Messages for Sexual Behavior Message 1 Avoiding sex is the most secure approach to anticipate pregnancy and sexually transmitted ailments or AIDS.

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KEY MESSAGES Key Messages for Sexual Behavior Message 2 If you have intercourse, be mindful. Utilize a condom each time you engage in sexual relations. On the off chance that you don\'t have a condom, don\'t engage in sexual relations. To guarantee you don\'t get pregnant or get your accomplice pregnant, and as a reinforcement to a condom, utilize another type of conception prevention

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INTERVENTION PROCEDURE Adolescent Health Screening Questionnaire preceding great visit Provider well-visit 20 to 30 minutes Health Educator visit 15 to 30 minutes

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Four in ten young ladies get pregnant in any event once before age 20. Source: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy investigation of Henshaw, S.K., U.S.. High school Pregnancy Statistics , New York: Alan Guttmacher Institute, May, 1996; and Forrest, J.D., Proportion of U.S. Ladies Ever Pregnant Before Age 20 , New York: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 1986, unpublished.

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International Pregnancy and Birth Rates, Teens 15-19 The United States has much higher youngster pregnancy and birth rates than other completely industrialized nations. U.S. adolescent pregnancy rates are twice as high as rates in Canada and eight times as high as rates in Japan. UNICEF. (2001). An alliance table of adolescent births in rich countries. Innocenti Report Card , 3. Pregnancy rates were computed by the National Campaign utilizing birth and fetus removal information from this report and unnatural birth cycle information which were evaluated utilizing the equation the Alan Guttmacher Institute utilizes as a part of producing U.S. high schooler pregnancy information, with miscarriages=20% of births + 10% of premature births. Simply the Facts (September 2004) – Page PB-3

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The outcomes of teenager parenthood are numerous: Less liable to finish secondary school Dependence on welfare Single parenthood More liable to have more kids sooner on a constrained salary More prone to mishandle or disregard the youngster National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (1997). Whatever Happened to Childhood? The Problem of Teen Pregnancy in the United States . Washington, DC: Author.

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Risks to offspring of high schooler moms growing up without a father low birthweight and rashness school disappointment mental impediment deficient medicinal services mishandle and disregard destitution and welfare reliance Source: Maynard, R.A., (ed.), Kids Having Kids: A Robin Hood Foundation Special Report on the Costs of Adolescent Childbearing, New York: Robin Hood Foundation, 1996.

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Only 32 percent of teenager moms get their secondary school recognition Teen moms: Educational fulfillment by age 30 68% 32% National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (1997). Whatever Happened to Childhood? The Problem of Teen Pregnancy in the United States . Washington, DC: Author.

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The offspring of teenager moms are at more serious danger of misuse and disregard 110 51 29 18 National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (1997). Whatever Happened to Childhood? The Problem of Teen Pregnancy in the United States . Washington, DC: Author.

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Taxpayers spend about $6.9 billion ($2,831 per high schooler guardian) on adolescent childbearing Estimated yearly expenses to citizens of teenager childbearing in billions $1.0 $1.4 $2.7 $1.7 $0.1 National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (1997). Whatever Happened to Childhood? The Problem of Teen Pregnancy in the United States . Washington, DC: Author.

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Teen birth rates, young ladies matured 15-19 (number of births per 1,000 young ladies) The high schooler birth rate declined consistently from 1960 through the mid-1970s, stayed genuinely steady for the following decade, then expanded 24 percent somewhere around 1986 and 1991. Somewhere around 1991 and 1999, the youngster birth rate diminished 20 percent to a record low. Note: information for 1999 are preparatory. Curtin, S.C., & Martin, J.A. (2000). Births: Preliminary information for 1999. National Vital Statistics Reports 48 (14). Ventura, S.J., Mathews, T.J., & Curtin, S.C. (1998). Decreases in high school birth rates, 1991-97: National and state designs. National Vital Statistics Reports 47 (12).

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Nearly 1 million adolescent pregnancies. To put it another path, more than 100 U.S. teenagers get to be pregnant every hour. Forty percent of these pregnancies were to young ladies under age 18, and 60 percent were to young ladies matured 18-19. 100 high schooler young ladies get pregnant every hour Total: 905,000 542,640 337,530 24,830 The Alan Guttmacher Institute. (1999). Exceptional report: U.S. adolescent pregnancy measurements with near insights for ladies matured 20-24 . New York: Author.

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Each year, a large portion of a million high schoolers conceive an offspring Just more than one-portion of adolescent pregnancies to young ladies matured 15-19 finished in birth, around 33% finished in fetus removal, and 14 percent finished in premature delivery. 124,700 491,577 263,890 The Alan Guttmacher Institute. (1999). Exceptional report: U.S. adolescent pregnancy insights with similar measurements for ladies matured 20-24 . New York: Author.

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55 high schooler young ladies conceive an offspring every hour Nearly one-half million youngster births happened. To put it another route, more than 55 U.S. teenagers conceive an offspring every hour. Thirty-six percent of these births were to young ladies under age 18, and 64 percent were to young ladies matured 18-19. Complete: 484,794 312,186 9,049 163,559 * Data for 1999 are preparatory. Curtin, S.C., & Martin, J.A. (2000). Births: Preliminary information for 1999. National Vital Statistics Reports 48 (14).

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State high schooler pregnancy rates (pregnancies per 1,000 young ladies matured 15-19) 50-62 for every 1,000 65-85 for each 1,000 86-90 for every 1,000 95-106 for each 1,000 108-140 for each 1,000 Teen pregnancy rates shift broadly by state, going from 50 for every 1,000 in North Dakota to 140 for each 1,000 in Nevada. The Alan Guttmacher Institute. (1999). High school pregnancy: Overall patterns and state-by-state data . New York: Author.

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Changes in teenager pregnancy rates (pregnancies per 1,000 young ladies matured 15-19) 16.4-31.2% decrease 12.2-15.5% decay 9.4-11.5% decay 3.4-9.2% decrease No change Teen pregnancy rates declined in each state yet New Jersey; decreases went from 3.4 percent in Nevada to 31.2 percent in Alaska. The Alan Guttmacher Institute. (1999). T eenage pregnancy: Overall patterns and state-by-state data . New York: Author.

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