Mycology Survey: ID of Normal Dermatophytes.


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Double tap on any of the words recorded above to go specifically to the ... Province development is moderate, fine, with a yellow to khaki surface shading and chamois to cocoa reverse. ...
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Mycology Review: Identification of Common Dermatophytes Sandy Arduin, MT (ASCP) Bruce Palma, MT (ASCP) Mycology Unit Bureau of Laboratories Michigan Department of Community Health This task was bolstered to some extent by Grant/Cooperative Agreement NumberU10/CCU523395-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Its substance are exclusively the obligation of Michigan Department of Community Health and don\'t as a matter of course speak to the official perspectives of CDC

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Dermatophytes

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Index Microsporum nanum Differentiation Table Test Your Knowledge Unknown 1 Unknown 2 Unknown 3 Unknown 4 Unknown 5 Unknown 6 Trichophyton rubrum Trichophyton mentagrophytes Hair Perforation Test Trichophyton tonsurans Trichophyton verrucosum Trichophyton terrestre Epidermophyton floccosum Microsporum canis Microsporum gypseum Double tap on any of the words recorded above to go straightforwardly to the slide on that creature. To come back to the record, click on the home catch. To come back to the keep going slide saw, click on the arrival catch. You should be in slide show mode to utilize these capacities. Plainly visible province morphology portrayals depend on societies developed on SAB agar. State morphology may fluctuate on other society media.

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Trichophyton rubrum Colony development is moderate to direct, wool, white at first glance with a red to cocoa reverse. Microconidia are club-molded to pyriform and are framed at the edges of the hyphae. Macroconidia are pencil-formed to stogie molded. Lab tests: hair puncturing test negative, urease negative, development at 37 °C. Contamination is ordinarily found on the feet, hands, nails, or crotch.

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Trichophyton mentagrophytes Colony development is tolerably fast, fine to granular, white to cream hued at first glance with a yellowish, cocoa or red-chestnut opposite. Microconidia are various, unicellular, round to pyriform and found in grape like groups. Winding hyphae are frequently present. Macroconidia are multiseptate, club-molded and regularly missing. Lab tests: hair puncturing test positive, urease positive, development at 37 °C. Contamination is normally found on the feet, hands, or crotch, yet can likewise be connected with provocative injuries of the scalp, nails, and facial hair.

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Perforations Hair Perforation Test Trichophyton mentagrophytes , Hair aperture test is certain. Trichophyton rubrum , Hair aperture test is negative.

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Trichophyton tonsurans Colony development is moderate, calfskin like to fine, white, beige, light yellow to sulfur yellow at first glance with a yellow to dull chestnut opposite. Microconidia are various, fluctuating fit as a fiddle and size (pyriform, club-formed to expand molded). Macroconidia are uncommon. At the point when present they are crooked with smooth dividers. Lab tests: hair puncturing test normally negative, urease positive, development at 37 °C. Development is improved on thiamine. Contaminations are essentially of the scalp. Every so often the glabrous skin or nails are contaminated.

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Trichophyton verrucosum Colony development is moderate, glabrous to softly fleece, white, now and again yellow or dim at first glance with no trademark color on the converse. Microconidia are club-formed, yet are uncommon or truant. Regularly, chlamydospores in chains are seen. Macroconidia have a "rodent tail" appearance, however are once in a while seen. Lab tests: hair puncturing test negative, urease negative, development at 37°C. Development is improved on media with thiamine and inositol, and is more fast at 37 ºC than at 25 ºC. Contamination is more normal on cows or other homestead creatures. Disease in people is normally found on the scalp, facial hair or glabrous skin.

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Trichophyton terrestre Colony development is quick, fine to smooth, white to cream at first glance with a pale, somewhat yellow opposite. Every so often, detaches may have a pink, red-cocoa, or wine-shaded converse. Microconidia are various, club-molded, with a squared-off course, frequently borne on short pedicels. Macroconidia are 2-8 celled and by and large borne at right edges to the hyphae. Lab tests: hair aperture test positive, urease positive and won\'t develop at 37 °C. This is a geophilic growth, exceptionally basic in soil. It can likewise be confined from the hide of little warm blooded animals.

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Epidermophyton floccosum Colony development is moderate, fine, with a yellow to khaki surface shading and chamois to cocoa reverse. Macroconidia are club formed, with slight smooth dividers and can be single or gathered in bunches. Chlamydospores are regularly delivered in huge numbers. Microconidia are missing. Lab tests: hair puncturing test negative, urease positive, development at 37 °C. Diseases are generally cutaneous, particularly of the crotch or feet.

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Microsporum canis Colony development is fast, fleece to wooly, cream to yellow at first glance with a yellow to yellow-orange opposite. Microconidia are club-molded yet regularly are truant. Macroconidia are fusoid, verrucose, and thick walled. They have a recurved peak and contain 5-15 cells. Lab tests: hair aperture test positive and urease positive. Disease in people happens on the scalp and glabrous skin. It is additionally a reason for ringworm in felines and puppies.

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Microsporum gypseum Colony development is fast, fleece, getting to be fine to granular, cream, brownish buff, or pale cinnamon at first glance with a beige to red-chestnut opposite. Microconidia are reasonably rich and club-formed. Macroconidia are copious, ellipsoidal to fusiform, here and there verrucose, and slight walled. They commonly contain 3-6 cells. Lab tests: hair puncturing test positive and urease positive. Disease in people is found on the scalp and glabrous skin; it is all the more every now and again secluded from the dirt and from the hide of little rodents.

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Microsporum nanum Colony development is quick, fleece to fine, white to buff at first glance, with a red-chestnut opposite. Microconidia, if present, happen in little numbers. Macroconidia are various, 1-3 celled, and have a trademark pear or egg shape. Ordinarily macroconidia are 2 celled. Conidia are singular on the closures of short conidiophores. Lab tests: hair puncturing test positive and urease positive. Contamination is once in a while transmitted to people; it is the key reason for tinea in pigs.

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Dermatophyte Differentiation Table:

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Test Your Knowledge Each obscure slide has the accompanying route catches to help you: View dermatophyte separation table View file slide Return to already saw slide View right Answer

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Unknown 1 Colony development is fast, fleece to wooly, cream to yellow at first glance with a yellow to yellow-orange opposite. Answer

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Unknown 2 Colony development is tolerably quick, fine to granular, white to cream hued at first glance with a yellowish, cocoa or red-chestnut converse. Answer

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Unknown 3 Colony development is fast, wool to fine, white to buff at first glance, with a red-cocoa reverse. Answer

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Unknown 4 Colony development is moderate, glabrous to delicately fleece, white, once in a while yellow or dark at first glance with no trademark color on the converse. Development is upgraded on media with thiamine and inositol, and is more quick at 37 ºC than at 25 ºC. Answer

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Unknown 5 Colony development is moderate to direct, wool, white at first glance with a red to chestnut opposite. Answer

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Unknown 6 Colony development is quick, fleece, getting to be fine to granular, cream, brownish buff, or pale cinnamon at first glance with a beige to red-chestnut opposite. Answer

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Glossary Anthropophilic A parasite (dermatophyte) which becomes specially on people, instead of on creatures or in soil. Clavate Club-formed. Conidium A unicellular or multicellular contagious component which serves as an abiogenetic regenerative structure. Dermatophyte A mold having a place with the genera: Epidermophyton, Microsporum, Trichophyton; commonly infecting skin, hair and nails. Fusoid Spindle molded; ellipsoidal with two decreased closures. Glabrous Smooth, lacking hairs. Geophilic A parasite (dermatophyte) which becomes specially on substrates found in the dirt, instead of on creatures or people. Macroconidia The bigger of two sorts of conidia delivered by the same growth. May be multicellular. Microconidia The littler of two sorts of conidia created by the same organism. Commonly unicellular. Onychomycosis Fungal contamination of the nails. Winding hyphae Hyphae bended into a winding. Regularly found in Trichophyton mentagrophytes, yet might be seen in other dermatophytes too Verrucose Having numerous warts Zoophilic A parasite (dermatophyte) which becomes specially on creatures, as opposed to on people or in soil.

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Bibliography de Hoog, G.S., Guarro, J., Figueras, Gene & M.J. 2000. Chart book of Clinical Fungi, 2 nd ed. Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures. Utrecht, The Netherlands. Benecke, E.S., and Rogers, A.L. 1996. Medicinal Mycology and Human Mycoses . Star Publishing Company, Belmont, California. Kane, Julius, Summerbell, Richard, Sigler, Lynn, Krajden, Sigmund, and Land, Geoffrey. 1997. Research center Handbook of Dermatophytes. Star Publishing Co., Belmont, CA. Larone, Davise H. 1995. Medicinally Important Fungi, A Guide to Identification , 3 rd ed., ASM Press, Washington, D.C. McGinnis, M.R. 1980. Research facility Handbook of Medical Mycology , Academic Press, New York, New York. McGinnis, M.R., D\'Amato, RF., Land, GA. 1982. Pictorial Handbook of Medically Important Fungi and Aerobic Actinomycetes . Praeger Publishing. Murray, P.R., Brown, E.J., Pfallen, M.A., Tenover, F.C., Yolken, R.H., Manual of Clinical Microbiology , 7 th Edition, ASM Press, Washington, D.C. Rebell, Gerbert, Taplin, David. 1974. Dermatophytes, Their Recognition and Identification. College of Miami Press, Coral Gables, Florida. Rippon, J.W., 1974. Medicinal Mycology The Pathogenic Fungi and The Pathogenic Actinomy

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