Navajo Indians 1850-1930.


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What is the first's name craftsmanship school established in 1930 for Native Americans? ... What is the first's name craftsmanship school established in 1930 for Native Americans? ...
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Amy Bates Kathy Buxton Tory Cohn Gaby Fonseca Diana Kuch Hillary Thomas Alison Viefhaus Navajo Indians 1850-1930

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Study Guide page 1 What is the name of the profound power that the Navajo\'s trust in? What is seen as the force of the Almighty? At the point when is a Kinaalda held in a Navajo young lady\'s life? Why is a young ladies state of mind so imperative amid the Kinaalda? What happened to kids amid the genocidal push on Navajos? What was "The Long Walk"? At the point when was the New Treaty marked, discharging the Navajos? What are two conventional amusements that Navajo kids played? At five years old, what were Navajo youngsters given by their guardians?

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Study Guide page 2 What is the other name that the Navajos are known by? By making the Navajo kids learn and talk in just English, what was the primary effect on their Native dialect? What is the name of the primary craftsmanship school established in 1930 for Native Americans? What were sandpaintings accomplished for? Why was the bear barely ever murdered and eaten in the Navajo society? What season did Navajo men continue chasing undertakings and why? How old were Navajo young men when they began to chase?

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? What is the other name that the Navajos are known by?

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Background Information The name Navajo for the most part signifying "Takers of the field" were given their name by the Tewa individuals. The Navajo are additionally alluded to as Din é , signifying "The People". There are distinctive spellings for both of these terms, including Navaho and Dineh. The Navajo have a place with the phonetic gathering known as the Athapaskan. The Navajo Indians are Southwestern Indians found the areas of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

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? What is the name of the profound power that the Navajo\'s have confidence in? What is seen as the force of the Almighty?

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The Almighty The Navajo Indians trust in the Almighty. The Almighty is a profound power that is the wellspring of life. It is not imagined as a man in the sky It is nebulous and exist in the universe.

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Prayer The Sun Viewed as the force of the Almighty Is not worshiped Is implored on the grounds that it is an image of the Almighty.

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Afterlife Navajo Indians don\'t give careful consideration to existence in the wake of death. After death, the spirit wanders around into an alternate universe. The spirit goes ahead with ordinary exercises like he or she used to do when they were alive. Same life—diverse universe.

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? At the point when is a Kinaalda held in a Navajo young lady\'s life? Why is a young ladies demeanor so essential amid the Kinaalda?

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Ceremony of Kinaalda Ceremony for a Navajo young lady whose first menstrual cycle has started. Emotional four day and night function is held in her honor. She turns into a tribal image for fruitfulness There are numerous ceremonies associated with the Kinaalda. Most Navajo young ladies will wed inside the year after the Kinaalda function. HAIR BRUSHING Resembles "The Changing Woman" and cleansing of the young lady. DRESSING in attire and adornments that has a place with her family is trusted that it will bring her riches and achievement.

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LIFTING takes after the dressing and is trusted that the young lady will imagine and have babies. Trim is done to make the young lady wonderful and shapely. This must be finished by a lady who has riches, thriving, great character, wellbeing and quality. Hustling is done to enhance the leg muscles and to make her body solid, supple and vivacious. It is believed that those that keep running with her will get awesome favors. CORN GRINDING is another critical piece of this function. It is potentially the best test of the four day, since it is trusted that it safeguards that her future will be solid and innovative. All through her Kinaalda the young lady is not permitted to eat anything that is not made of corn or she will get to be lethargic, terrible, wrinkled and feeble and not able to perform her obligations.

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\'ALKAAN is sweetened chile cake that is heated as an offering to the sun. The \'Alkaan is then cut and everybody is given piece. It is trusted that the cake must be imparted to everybody or the young lady will turn into an egotistical individual. It is trusted that if the young lady eats her own particular cake that her teeth will drop out, and she will escape. BRUSHING AND PAINTING is done after the \'Alkaan is served. The young ladies\' hair is brushed once more. She is then painted with paint made of white shells and speaks to "The Changing Woman". The finish of the Kinaalda is trailed by Navajo stylized practices of a four day time of formal calm. In a perfect world the young lady will ponder the occasions of the four day service and what has been taught to her. A young ladies mentality is critical amid the function since it is trusted that their grown-up identity will be controlled by the idiosyncrasies and activities shown amid the Kinaalda.

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? What happened to youngsters amid the genocidal push on Navajos? What was "The Long Walk"? At the point when was the new Treaty marked, discharging the Navajos?

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Major Events Early 1850\'s Culture conflicts achieved a brutal crest with Hispanic, Navajo, Mescalero, Ute and Anglo people groups all battling for survival. The primary U.S. Armed force station on Navajo region was fabricated and named Fort Defiance. 1860\'s Thousands of Navajo\'s assaulted Fort Defiance, however neglected to oust the armed force. 1860-1868 Women and offspring of the tribes were stolen and sold as slaves.

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Major Events cont. 1862 Kit Carleson, under the requests of General James Carleton started a genocidal push against Navajo and Apache. Every single male Navajo were to surrender or be shot. The individuals who surrendered were taken to Fort Sumner in Eastern New Mexico. This was known as "The Long Walk" in light of the fact that the trek was 300 miles in length.

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Major Events cont. Late 1863-December 1864 8,354 Navajos surrendered. Navajos were immediately exchanged crosswise over New Mexico Territory. (The Long Walk) The matured, powerless, youngsters, and pregnant ladies who couldn\'t keep up were shot. Presentation and looseness of the bowels took several more lives. Last passing number was around 3,000 Navajos

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Major Events cont. 1868 U.S. concedes "disappointment at enlightening" the Navajo and General Carleton was released for oppression. June 1, 1868 another settlement was marked discharging the Navajo back to the reservation destinations albeit numerous came back to their unique homes.

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? Why was the bear scarcely ever executed and eaten in the Navajo society? What season did Navajo men continue chasing campaigns and why? How old were Navajo young men when they began to chase?

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Making a Living The Navajo economy from the 1600\'s to the mid 1900\'s relied on upon horticulture and domesticated animals. Amid the late spring months the Navajo planted corn, beans, and squash on the floodplains and tributaries of the San Juan River, while they raised their sheep, stallions, and goats in the mountains. Winter camps were at a lower height where they could be more shielded from the components. Amid this period the expression "bringing home the bacon" alluded to gathering enough nourishment to stay alive.

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Agriculture Beans, corn, and squash were staples to the Navajo individuals. Any and each sort of seed and root that could be utilized, was utilized for something. Planting and developing was a family work. The men would begin burrowing gaps as well as lines, and the ladies and kids would take after behind dropping seeds into the dirt and after that concealing them. While men were away chasing, ladies would do their part, by uncovering roots or shaking little seeds from wild plants.

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Hunting Every man and kid was required to wind up a seeker. Young men as youthful as four were caught up with setting traps for rats and gophers. It was not until they achieved the age of 18 that they were out loud to go with their tribe on chasing campaigns. Men would be away on chasing undertakings for quite a long time at time, for the most part in the Autumn season. The Autumn season was the best to hunt since it was this time the creatures were the fattest and could give the most nourishment and supplies. The meat of the creature was eaten, their teeth were utilized to make adornments, their bones were utilized to make lances and burrowing and chasing devices, and their hide was utilized to make covers and coats.

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The Bear The Navajo executed and ate verging on each creature. One of the main special cases was the Bear. The bear was seen as practically human since it could stroll on it\'s rear legs and utilize its paws like a man. The main time a bear was killed was the point at which it\'s skin was required for a service, or when the Navajo individuals were starving and could locate no other sustenance. At the point when the bear was murdered, the individual slaughtering it addressed it first to clarify why they should be executed and after that the bear was appealed to God for. When it was slaughtered, it was clubbed so no blood would be drawn.

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Harder Times After the Navajo were allowed to come back to their country after the long stroll to Fort Sumner, farming was not the same. Since the Navajo were given little parcels, overgrazing and soil disintegration got to be issues. This prompted the decrease of animals. This decrease discouraged a great deal of the Navajo on the grounds that their riches was measured in sheep and numerous were directed to butcher their groups keeping in mind the end goal to "bring home the bacon".

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? By making the Navajo kids learn and talk in just English, what was the principle influence on their Native dialect?

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Education Navajo kids were generally taught by their guardians and kindred tribes individuals. Their training was begun when they could walk and they were dealt with like grown-ups. The youngsters were taught to act like senior citizens in the tribe. They were taught how to get sustenance, tribal traditions, and the historical backdrop of their kin. Youngsters were taught orally. That is the manner by which they took in the Athapaskan dialect.

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Indian kids were beginning to be instructed by the Government in this time period. The Indian kids were taken off

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