North Carolina Maturing Demographics.


64 views
Uploaded on:
Category: Sports / Games
Description
North Carolina Maturing Demographics Arranged by the UNC Foundation on Maturing Last upgraded October 2007 Populace Is Getting More established More seasoned grown-ups are the quickest developing portion of North Carolina's populace.
Transcripts
Slide 1

North Carolina Aging Demographics Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Last upgraded October 2007

Slide 2

Population Is Getting Older grown-ups are the quickest developing fragment of North Carolina’s populace. Number of elderly individuals (65+) in the state will dramatically multiply somewhere around 2000 and 2030, expanding from 969,000 in 2000 to 2.145 million by 2030. Number of most established old (85+) will substantially more than twofold amid this time period, expanding from 105,000 in 2000 to 258,000 in 2030. Reasons include: normal expand (births short passings), expanded futures, and net movement into the state. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “Past and Expected Trends.”

Slide 3

65+ Population in 1990 Counties with more than 15% of aggregate populace 65+ Statewide: 12% Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, Census 1990.

Slide 4

65+ Population in 2000 Counties with more than 15% of aggregate populace 65+ Statewide: 12% Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, Census 2000.

Slide 5

65+ Population in 2020 Counties with more than 15% of aggregate populace 65+ Statewide: 15% Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “Projected County Totals – Standard Age Groups,” July 1, 2020. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 6

Population Shift in North Carolina Percent of Population by Age Group (1970-2030) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: U.S. Evaluation Bureau and North Carolina State Demographics Unit.

Slide 7

Life Expectancies At Birth Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “North Carolina Life Expectancies.”

Slide 8

Life Expectancies at Age 65 Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “North Carolina Life Expectancies.”

Slide 9

How Many Years of Good Health? Minority men and ladies in North Carolina don\'t live the length of whites, yet they have more years of weakness. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: CDC, Chronic Disease Notes & Reports, vol. 16, no. 2/3 (2004).

Slide 10

Leading Causes of Death North Carolina Residents Age 65+ (2005) Chronic maladies are in charge of 65% of all passings in North Carolina. A large portion of the main sources of death for North Carolinians – including coronary illness and diabetes – can be forestalled. Coronary illness Cancer Cerebrovascular Disease Chronic Respiratory Diseases Alzheimer’s Diabetes Source of information: North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics, North Carolina Vital Statistics, Volume 2: Leading Causes of Death – 2005 . Table A: Leading Causes of Death by Age Group. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 11

More Older Women North Carolina Population by Gender and Age (2005) All Ages Age 65+ Age 85+ Male 28.2% Male 49.3% Male 41% Female 50.7% Female 59% Female 71.8% Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “County/State Population Estimates,” Certified 2005. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 12

Racial & Ethnic Differences Composition of 65+ Population (2005 evaluations) In North Carolina: Overall U.S. White: 85.3% Black: 8.3% American Indian: .5% Asian: 3.2% Some Other Race: 2% Two or More Races: .7% Hispanic*: 6.4% Black 15.5% American Indian .9% Asian .7% Hispanic* .8% White 82.3% *Note: Persons of Hispanic cause may be of any race; gauges for “Some other Race” in NC is .2% and “Two or More Races” in NC is .4%. Wellspring of information: U.S. Statistics Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 13

Proportion of Older Minorities Source of information: North Carolina State Demographics Unit, “County/State Population Projections.” Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 14

Educational Attainment Education Levels of Older Adults (2000) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: U.S. Registration Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey, Table PCT033.

Slide 15

Older Adults Migrate to North Carolina Number of grown-ups age 60+ who lived in an alternate state 5 years prior Source of information: 1970-1990 information from Dr. Charles Longino; 2000 information from Internal Migration of the Older Population: 1995 to 2000 (CENSR-10). Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 16

Net Migration Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 17

North Carolina versus Across the country Percent of 65+ populace (2005 appraisals) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: U.S. Evaluation Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey.

Slide 18

Older Workers in North Carolina Percent of NC populace in the work power (2000) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of information: U.S. Enumeration Bureau, Census 2000 Supplementary Survey Table PCT047.

Slide 19

Health Professionals In Short Supply Source: North Carolina Rural Health Research Program, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 20

Medicaid Eligibility of Older Adults in NC Source: NC Division of Medical Assistance, Medicaid in North Carolina: Annual Report State Fiscal Year 2006. Arranged by the UNC Institute on Aging

Slide 21

North Carolina Population Pyramids (1960 & 1990) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of outline: UNC Chapel Hill, School of Social Work, CARES & NC Division of Aging.

Slide 22

North Carolina Population Pyramid (2020 projection) Prepared by the UNC Institute on Aging Source of outline: UNC Chapel Hill, School of Social

Recommended
View more...