Periods of the Moon.


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The general areas and introductions for the periods of the moon. ... What stage is the moon? What time of day will this moon stage be high in the sky? ...
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Slide 1

´╗┐Periods of the Moon The general areas and introductions for the periods of the moon. (7) Third Quarter (6) Waning Gibbous (8) Waning Crescent Sunlight Earth (1) New Moon (5) Full Moon Sunlight Earth turns on its hub in the same heading as the moon\'s circle. (2) Waxing Crescent (4) Waxing Gibbous (3) First Quarter

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Perspective & The Moon\'s Face Sunlight Earth (1) New Moon Sunlight How a great part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? NEW MOON Wherever the individual looks all they see is shadowed moon. What time of day is it for the spectator? Twelve!!

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Sunlight Earth Sunlight (2) Waxing Crescent Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a significant part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? WAXING CRESCENT When you gaze upward you see just a little bow brilliantly lit. (Right Side) What time of day is it for the eyewitness? 3PM!!

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Sunlight Earth Sunlight (3) First Quarter Perspective & The Moon\'s Face Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a significant part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? To begin with QUARTER When you gaze upward you see one portion of the front face of the Moon splendidly lit. (Right side) What time of day is it for the onlooker? Dusk - 6PM!!

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Sunlight Earth Sunlight (4) Waxing Gibbous Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a great part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? WAXING GIBBOUS When you gaze upward you see just a little sickle, dimly shadowed, on the left. What time of day is it for the eyewitness? 9PM!!

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Sunlight Earth (5) Full Moon Sunlight Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a great part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? FULL MOON When you gaze upward you see the whole face of the Moon splendidly lit. What time of day is it for the onlooker? Midnight-12AM!!

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(6) Waning Gibbous Sunlight Earth Sunlight Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a significant part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? Winding down GIBBOUS When you gaze upward you see just a little sickle, hazily shadowed, on the privilege. What time of day is it for the spectator? 3AM!!

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(7) Third Quarter Sunlight Earth Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a significant part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? Second from last QUARTER When you turn upward you see one portion of the front face of the Moon splendidly lit. (Left side) What time of day is it for the onlooker? Dawn - 6AM!!

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(8) Waning Crescent Sunlight Earth Perspective & The Moon\'s Face How a great part of the moon\'s face does the individual see? Disappearing CRESCENT When you turn upward you see just a little bow splendidly lit. (Left Side) What time of day is it for the onlooker? 9AM!!

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What stage is the moon? What time of day will this moon stage high in the sky? (meridan) What time will this moon stage set? What time will this moon rise?

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What stage is the moon? What time of day will this moon stage high in the sky? (meridan) What time will this moon stage set? What time will this moon rise?

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This vintage 60-kopek stamp praises an emotional accomplishment. On the seventh of October, 1959, the Soviet "Luna 3" effectively captured the most distant side of the moon giving occupants of planet Earth their first historically speaking perspective of this shrouded side of the equator. Without the advanced picture innovation commonplace now, Luna 3 took the photos on 35mm film which was naturally created on board. The photos were then checked and the sign transmitted to Earth days after the fact in what was maybe additionally the main interplanetary fax. Taking all things together, seventeen pictures were gotten sufficiently giving scope and determination to build a far side guide and recognize a couple significant components. Delineated on the stamp are areas named the Sea of Moscow, the Soviet Mountains, the Bay of Astronauts, and the Sea of Dreams.

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Have you ever seen a corona around the Moon? This genuinely basic sight happens when high thin mists containing a large number of modest ice gems cover a great part of the sky. Every ice gem acts like a smaller than expected focal point. Since a large portion of the precious stones have a comparative lengthened hexagonal shape, light entering one gem face and leaving through the contradicting face refracts 22 degrees, which relates to the span of the Moon Halo. A comparative Sun Halo might be noticeable amid the day. The photo was taken in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, USA. Precisely how ice-gems structure in mists stays under scrutiny.

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