Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle: A Joyful Noise .


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Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle: A Joyful Noise. Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle: A Joyful Noise. Presented by Cherry Carl. Why “A Joyful Noise?”.
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Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle: A Joyful Noise

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Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle: A Joyful Noise Presented by Cherry Carl

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Why "A Joyful Noise?" Effective phonemic mindfulness instructional exercises encourage the advancement of positive sentiments toward learning through a climate of fun loving nature and fun. Listen nearly to youngsters as they investigate our dialect and you will hear serenades, sonnets, melodies, tongue-tanglers, and intuitive word play, all without the advantage of print! What a happy commotion!

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Presentation Highlights Understanding the Prerequisites to Successful Phonics Instruction Assessing Student Understanding of Phonemic Awareness Progression of Phonological Awareness Phonemic Awareness Tasks

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Presentation Highlights Developing Phonemic Awareness Activities to Promote Manipulation of Sounds and Syllables Special Needs Indicators Second Language Learners Taking a glance at Standards Resources

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What Does Research Say About Phonemic Awareness Instruction? Phonemic mindfulness can be educated and learned. Phonemic mindfulness direction helps kids figure out how to peruse. Phonemic mindfulness guideline helps youngsters figure out how to spell. Source: Put Reading First

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What Does Research Say About Phonemic Awareness Instruction? Phonemic mindfulness direction is best when kids are educated to control phonemes by utilizing the letters of the letter set. Phonemic mindfulness direction is best when it concentrates on stand out or two sorts of phoneme control, instead of a few sorts. Source: Put Reading First

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Understanding the Prerequisites to Successful Phonics Instruction "Look into shows that phonemic mindfulness is the best indicator of the simplicity of early perusing procurement, preferred even over IQ, vocabulary, and listening cognizance." (Stanovich, 1993-94)

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Understanding the Prerequisites to Successful Phonics Instruction "Phonemic mindfulness, or the capacity to hear and "portion" singular sounds in talked words, must happen before kids can start to see how letters speak to discourse sounds." (Reutzel and Cooter, 1999)

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Understanding the Prerequisites to Successful Phonics Instruction After youngsters get to be mindful of the alphabetic guideline, they build up the capacity to control letters and sounds. This helps them to decipher new words they experience in books and to make brief spellings in their written work. (Reutzel and Cooter, 1999)

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Assessing Student Understanding of Phonemic Awareness Letter ID Letter generation Recognizing rhyming words Auditory mixing of sounds Isolating sounds Writing phonemes in words

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Progression of Phonological Awareness words syllables onset-rime division phonemes [blending, division, coordinating, erasure

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Phonemic Awareness Tasks to hear rhymes and similar sounding word usage as measured by learning of nursery rhymes to do peculiarity assignments (analyzing the hints of words for rhyme and similar sounding word usage) to mix and split syllables

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Phonemic Awareness Tasks to perform phonemic division, (for example, checking out the quantity of phonemes in a word) to perform phoneme control errands, (for example, including, erasing a specific phoneme and recovering a word from the rest of).

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Developing Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle Language watching Using ecological print Playing with the letters in order Songs, serenades, and verse Alphabet books

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Developing Phonemic Awareness and the Alphabetic Principle Writing encounters Word elastic banding Hearing sounds in words Sound expansion or substitution Sound division

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Activities and Procedures to Promote Manipulation of Sounds and Syllables Elkonin boxes Rhyming word exercises Rhyming bingo Pocket diagram (sort by sound) Syllable Snap and Clap Walk Around a Rhyme Riddle and rhyme Rubber Band (extend a word)

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Activities and Procedures to Promote Manipulation of Sounds and Syllables Sound boxes Nonsense names Physical reactions (tapping, applauding, snapping) What\'s my pledge? Tap and touch Jump Rope Jingles Nursery Rhymes

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Special Needs Indicators Little or no learning of the letters in order Inability to name letters when displayed Inability to create letter or letterlike shapes in composing Inability to perceive rhyming sounds Inability to perceive or recognize particular letter sounds in words Inability to outline sounds onto letters Source: Reutzel and Cooter (1999)

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Taking a Look at California Standards

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Kindergarten Standards 1.7 Track (move consecutively from sound to sound) and speak to the number, similarity/contrast, and request of two and three segregated phonemes (e.g.,/f, s, th/,/j, d, j/).

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Kindergarten Standards 1.8 Track (move successively from sound to sound) and speak to changes in basic syllables and words with two and three sounds as one sound is included, substituted, precluded, moved, or rehashed (e.g., vowel-consonant, consonant-vowel, or consonant-vowel-consonant).

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Kindergarten Standards 1.9 Blend vowel-consonant sounds orally to make words or syllables. 1.10 Identify and create rhyming words in light of an oral incite. 1.11 Distinguish orally expressed one-syllable words and separate into starting or consummation sounds.

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Kindergarten Standards 1.12 Track auditorily every word in a sentence and every syllable in a word. 1.13 Count the quantity of sounds in syllables and syllables in words.

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First Grade Standards 1.4 Distinguish introductory, average, and last sounds in single-syllable words. 1.5 Distinguish long-and short-vowel sounds in orally expressed single-syllable words (e.g., bit/chomp). 1.6 Create and express a progression of rhyming words, including consonant mixes.

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First Grade Standards 1.7 Add, erase, or change target sounds to change words (e.g., change dairy animals to how; skillet to an). 1.8 Blend two to four phonemes into unmistakable words (e.g.,/c/a/t/= feline;/f/l/a/t/= level). 1.9 Segment single-syllable words into their parts (e.g.,/c/a/t/= feline;/s/p/l/a/t/= splat;/r/i/ch/= rich).

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Resources National Institute for Literacy (2001). Put perusing first: The examination building hinders for instructing youngsters to peruse. Jessup, MD: Author. Reutzel, D. Beam and Cooter, Robert B. Jr. (1999) Balanced Reading Strategies and Practices. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc. Yopp, Hallie and Ruth (2000) Supporting phonemic mindfulness advancement in the classroom. The Reading Teacher Vol. 54 No. 2.

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Instructional Resources Adams, Marilyn Jager et al (1997). Phonemic Awareness in Young Children: A Classroom Curriculum. Brookes Publishing Company. Blevins, Wiley (1999). Phonemic Awareness Activities for Early Reading Success (Grades K-2) Scholastic. Fitzpatrick, Jo (1997). Phonemic Awareness: Playing With Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading Skills (Phonemic Awareness) Creative Teaching Press.

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Instructional Resources Yopp, Hallie and Ruth (2003). Oo-pples and Boo-noo-noos: Songs and Activities for Phonemic Awareness. Harcourt School.

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Read Alouds for Phonemic Tasks Bynum, Janie (1999). Altoona Baboona. New York, NY: Harcourt Brace & Co. (phoneme substitution) Chapman, Cheryl (1993). Pass the Fritters, Critters. New York: Scholastic, Inc. (rhyming) Edwards, Pamela Duncan (1998) Some Smug Slug. Harper Trophy. (similar sounding word usage) Lester, Helen (1999). Hooway For Wodney Wat. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. (phoneme substitution)

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Read Alouds for Phonemic Tasks Most, Bernard (1996). Rooster A-Doodle-Moo! Harcourt Brace. (phoneme expansion and substitution) Salisbury, Kent. (1998). There\'s a Dragon in my Wagon! New York: McClanahan Book Company, Inc. (phoneme substitution) . There\'s a Bug in my Mug! . A Bear Ate my Pear! . My Nose is a Hose!

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Read Alouds for Phonemic Tasks Slepian, Jan and Seidler, A. (1967). The Hungry Thing. Educational. (phoneme substitution) Wilbur, Richard (1997). The Disappearing Alphabet. New York, NY: Harcourt Brace & Co. phoneme cancellation

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