Poli 103A: California Politics Water and Environmental Politics .


40 views
Uploaded on:
Category: Travel / Places
Description
Water and Environmental Politics. Water Stories and Water LessonsLos Angeles and ChinatownThe Bay Delta and the Peripheral CanalSan Diego and the Imperial Irrig. DistrictThe Endangered Species ActA Zero-Sum Game?The Wedge of Environmentalism. Los Angeles and Chinatown. The Need for Imported Water.From 1868 to 1910, Los Angeles\' 1,596 artesian wells almost went away the area\'s underground pools a
Transcripts
Slide 1

Poli 103A: California Politics Water and Environmental Politics

Slide 2

Water and Environmental Politics Water Stories and Water Lessons Los Angeles and Chinatown The Bay Delta and the Peripheral Canal San Diego and the Imperial Irrig. Locale The Endangered Species Act A Zero-Sum Game? The Wedge of Environmentalism

Slide 3

Los Angeles and Chinatown The Need for Imported Water. From 1868 to 1910, Los Angeles\' 1,596 artesian wells almost went away the zone\'s underground pools and stores. In 1900, the new Department of Water and Power anticipated deficiencies for the quickly developing city of 102,249. San Fernando Valley agriculturists had lost their riparian rights on the LA River.

Slide 4

In 1903-5, J.B. Lippincott (US Bureau of Reclamation) and Fred Eaton (previous LA Mayor) purchased up grounds along the Owens River, which nourished prospering ranches. In 1905 and again in 1910, a syndicate drove by Harry Chandler, Joseph Sartori, Henry Huntington, and M.H. Sherman purchased 108,000 sections of land of Valley land at $5-10 a section of land. Los Angeles and Chinatown

Slide 5

Los Angeles and Chinatown Unveiling the Plan. In July 1905, the LA Times declared the arrangement to fabricate a $25 million reservoir conduit, which was endorsed by voters in September after water dumping and proportioning. Owens Valley Resistance. In the wake of losing in the Legislature and courts, agriculturists dynamited water channel in 1924, yet by 1927 saluted their vanquishers.

Slide 6

The Owens Lake is become scarce, dusty The Valley sold for $50-100 a section of land. Los Angeles and Chinatown

Slide 7

Los Angeles and Chinatown Water Lesson #1: Water changes the estimation of land. In a condition of deserts, land esteem is worked by moving water. Water Lesson #2: Public relations are principal. Votes in favor of bonds need consideration, while shrewd dealings should be stayed under the radar.

Slide 8

The Bay Delta and the Peripheral Canal Red lines are state ventures Yellow are government ventures Green are neighborhood ventures

Slide 9

The Bay Delta and the Peripheral Canal "Intersection of California\'s Water." Where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers meet and stream into the San Francisco Bay: Local agriculturists and occupants utilize water. Preservationists attempt to secure wetlands in Delta and fish upstream. Freshwater is pushed over the Delta on its way to the Central Valley and SoCal.

Slide 10

The Bay Delta and the Peripheral Canal Jerry Brown upheld an activity to finish his dad Pat\'s legacy with the fringe waterway, with strings. The natural strings were too expensive for Central Valley agriculturists, who bankrolled the resistance to trench. Open vote on the channel lost 37-63% on the June, 1982 tally.

Slide 11

The Bay Delta and the Peripheral Canal Water Lesson #3: Alliances of accommodation don\'t keep going forever. Agriculturists\' political muscle and SoCal ratepayers cash not a solid security. Water Lesson #4: Water legislative issues is territorial governmental issues. 60% support for trench in Los Angeles, yet just 10% support in the Bay Area.

Slide 12

San Diego and the Imperial Irrigation District Huge value variations amongst private and rural clients: Residents pay $0.49-3.78 for each 748 gallons Farmers pay $14 per section of land/foot, or $.03 per 748 gallons, with government sponsorships Water Transfers. In 1992, Bill Bradley, George Miller, the EDF, and the Met changed government law to permit the deal Central Valley Project water to urbans.

Slide 13

San Diego and the Imperial Irrigation District The Metropolitan Water District (Met) is a huge extraordinary area that offers and transports water to part urban areas in Southern California. San Diego and neighboring urban areas are toward the "end of the Met\'s pipe." Imperial Valley has Colorado River rights, feeble productivity motivating forces.

Slide 14

San Diego and the Imperial Irrigation District Texans Sid and Lee Bass endeavored a moment Chinatown by purchasing Imperial Valley water rights to offer to urban communities. San Diego needed to purchase the water, however the Met\'s framework turned into the physical and legitimate staying point. October, 2003 arrangement sends 65 billion gallons a year to S.D for $50 million.

Slide 15

San Diego and the Imperial Irrigation District Water Lesson #5: Price variations make hatred, wasteful aspects, and the open door for enormous arrangements.

Slide 16

The Endangered Species Act: A Zero Sum Game? What the Acts Say: 1973 Federal ESA and CESA say that researchers figure out if species are "debilitated" or "jeopardized," then organizations receive preservation arranges and disallow private "takings" of species. Offices can\'t imperil living space. Logging, advancement, or expressways can be stopped if spotted owls, gnatcatchers, or kangaroo rats are hurt or risked.

Slide 17

The Endangered Species Act: The Wedge of Environmentalism The instance of the expansion of "coincidental take" grants to the CESA uncovers the amazing governmental issues of the earth. Endeavors to move back the CESA after the Republicans took control of the Assembly in 1994 came to far and fizzled. After Democrats retook control, SB 879 (Johnston, D-Stockton) disregarded resistance of most natural gatherings, however with an impartial Sierra Club.

Slide 18

The Endangered Species Act: The Wedge of Environmentalism Support for farming in the Central Valley and advancement in Orange and Riverside Counties drive a wedge inside the Democratic Party. Bolster for beach front and mountain natural protection parts Republicans in San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Silicon Valley.

Slide 19

Discussion Questions Should the wrongdoings of Mulholland in the Owens Valley be gone by upon today\'s Los Angeles water ratepayers? Why is water evaluated bring down for agrarian uses than it is for residential utilize? Would it be a good idea for it to be? Is environmentalism a wedge issue at the statewide level?

Recommended
View more...