Proof Based General Wellbeing Work on: Utilizing Exploration and Information to Enhance Your Projects.


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Confirmation based general wellbeing is characterized as the advancement, execution, and ... Upgraded rules for assessing general wellbeing observation frameworks. ...
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Proof Based Public Health Practice: Using Research and Data to Improve Your Programs Helena VonVille Library Director University of Texas School of Public Health This task has been financed in entire or partially with Federal assets from the National Library of Medicine National lnstitutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No NO1-LM-6-3505.

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Workshop Agenda Overview of proof based general wellbeing rehearse Access wellbeing information Access to EBPH assets Systematic audits Guidelines Access to research writing Online databases

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What is confirmation based general wellbeing? Numerous definitions From Evidence-Based Medicine to Evidence-Based Public Health Evidence-based general wellbeing is characterized as the advancement, usage, and assessment of compelling projects and approaches in general wellbeing through utilization of standards of experimental thinking, including deliberate employments of information and data frameworks, and fitting utilization of behavioral science hypothesis and system arranging models. ( Brownson , Ross C., Elizabeth A. Bread cook, Terry L. Leet , and Kathleen N. Gillespie, Editors. Proof Based Public Health . New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.) E-Roadmap to Public Health Practice Concepts  (New Hampshire Institute for Health Policy and Practice) Developing, executing, and assessing general wellbeing projects or general wellbeing approaches (in general wellbeing terms a "intervention") that have 1) information exhibiting their adequacy and 2) an establishing in a wellbeing conduct hypothesis or biological model of wellbeing.

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What is proof based general wellbeing? Numerous definitions "The way toward coordinating science-based mediations with group inclinations to enhance the soundness of populaces." (Kohatsu ND, Robinson JG, Torner JC. Proof based general wellbeing: A developing idea . Am J Prev Med. 2004 Dec;27(5):417-21.)

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What is proof based general wellbeing? Enhance people group wellbeing Involve the group Community-based participatory exploration Use examination and information Don\'t overlook what you definitely know

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Steps for EBPH Develop an underlying proclamation of the issue Gather information to measure it Use the examination writing to figure out what is now known Develop system or approach choices Create a usage arrangement Evaluate the project or strategy arrangement O\'Neall, M. A., & Brownson, R. C. (2005). Showing proof based general wellbeing to general wellbeing specialists . Records of Epidemiology, 15 (7), 540-544.

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Step 1: Develop an underlying proclamation of the issue What is the wellbeing issue? What are the powers that may shape this issue? Political? Individual? Social standards? Natural? Who are key partners? Counting people group individuals What do you know as a rule about the issue?

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Step 1: Develop an underlying proclamation of the issue Use PICO (from EBM) to start characterize question P: Population I: Intervention C: Comparison O: Outcome Use a rationale model to start your vital arranging Inputs, exercises, yields, results (short/long haul) W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide http://www.wkkf.org/Pubs/Tools/Evaluation/Pub3669.pdf Logic model instructional exercises (CDC) http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dashoet/logic_model_1/menu.html http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dashoet/logic_model_2/index.html

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Public Health Surveillance "..nonstop and efficient procedure of gathering, examination, translation, and spread of distinct data for checking wellbeing issues." 1 "… for use in general wellbeing activity to decrease horribleness and mortality and to enhance wellbeing." 2 1 Buehler, J.W. (1998). Observation. In: Rothman KJ, Greenland S. Cutting edge the study of disease transmission (third ed., 435-57). Philadelphia, PA: Lippencott-Raven. 2 Guidelines Working Group. (2001). Upgraded rules for assessing general wellbeing reconnaissance frameworks. MMWR 50(RR13):1-35. Recovered March 2, 2008 from: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/sneak peak/mmwrhtml/rr5013a1.htm

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Types of Surveillance Systems Vital Statistics Birth and demise Reported to CDC See http://wonder.cdc.gov for more Notifiable ailments Lists of notifiable illnesses at http://www.cdc.gov/epo/dphsi/phs/infdis.htm Changes during the time Buehler, J.W. (1998). Observation. In: Rothman KJ, Greenland S. Present day the study of disease transmission (third ed., 435-57). Philadelphia, PA: Lippencott-Raven.

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Types of Surveillance Systems Laboratory-based reconnaissance Can get point by point data about pathogen Not generally powerful Physicians can maintain a strategic distance from lab for "delicate" infections for prominent individuals Volunteer Providers Can be in the nick of time for non-notifiable maladies Registeries Tracks all events of kind of sickness or condition or classification of illness or condition Birth deserts Cancer Buehler, J.W. (1998). Reconnaissance. In: Rothman KJ, Greenland S. Present day the study of disease transmission (third ed., 435-57). Philadelphia, PA: Lippencott-Raven.

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Types of Surveillance Systems Surveys Monitors practices, wellbeing status, learning and dispositions BRFSS, NHANES, Information Systems Info gathered for general purposes Vital records, HCUP, Workers Compensation Sentinel Events Disease episodes Buehler, J.W. (1998). Reconnaissance. In: Rothman KJ, Greenland S. Present day the study of disease transmission (third ed., 435-57). Philadelphia, PA: Lippencott-Raven.

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Types of Surveillance Systems Record Linkages Link information from more than one framework Birth/baby passings More data Buehler, J.W. (1998). Reconnaissance. In: Rothman KJ, Greenland S. Present day the study of disease transmission (third ed., 435-57). Philadelphia, PA: Lippencott-Raven.

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Sources of Data National Data from Federal Agencies National Center for Education Statistics National Center for Health Statistics Bureau of Labor Statistics Census Bureau FBI Housing & Urban Development EPA SAMHSA NCI Medicare/Medicaid State government offices Non-benefit associations Colleges/Universities Other examination associations

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Where do we stand? What do we do well? Births & passings Infectious malady Cancer What don\'t we do well? Ceaseless sicknesses Linkages for specific sorts of conditions

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Step 2: Quantify the Issue Confidentiality Public information County level normally Census Bureau exemption Hospital release information IRB endorsement from state & home organization TX charges for the information Surveys that you incite IRB endorsement from your foundation?

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Step 3: Use the Research Is there examination identified with your issue? Your populace? Your illness? Is it safe to say that it was assessed suitably? Hypothesis based?

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Step 3: Research the Issue Sources of Research Evidence-based exploration accumulations CommunityGuide.org Cochrane Library Clinical Practice Guidelines All accessible from Evidence-Based Public Health Web website http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/library/default.aspx?id=2909

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Step 3: Research the Issue Sources of Research amalgamations Others have assessed & screened the examination TheCommunityGuide.org Using What Works: Adapting Evidence-Based Programs to Fit Your Needs (Nat\'l Cancer Institute) Clinical Practice Guidelines   (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) National Guideline Clearinghouse Clinical Practice Guidelines Online

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Step 3: Research the Issue Sources of Research Original examination Online databases through your nearby open library TexShare program Free of charge Just need a library card Access to full content articles Through TexShare databases Through open access diaries Through DSHS Medical and Research Library Contact them for qualification http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/library/default.shtm

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Step 4: Develop project or approach alternatives Review what you think about general wellbeing programs Determine criteria for to organize choices Evaluate potential costs (cost-adequacy and money saving advantage)

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Step 5: Create an Implementation Plan Refine your portrayal of the issue Go back to your rationale model Add inputs Expand exercises Refine results Implement!

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Step 6: Evaluate the project or strategy Qualitative Focus bunches, town corridors, neighborhood walk-throughs , overviews Quantitative Just the truths! Study members Before and after Look at wellbeing information patterns from before system to after project Decide on the off chance that you end or modify

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Questions? On to: Access to wellbeing information assets Please go to CHARTing Health Information for Texas: http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/graphing and the group appraisal exercise manual

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