Purposes for Utilizing PowerPoint.


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Purposes for Utilizing PowerPoint. Why use PowerPoint? Late study: Understudies put high esteem on PowerPoint in territories of learning and inspiration (Tang and Austin) Does our utilization of innovation in the classroom advance understudy learning? At the point when is PowerPoint superfluous?.
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Purposes for Using PowerPoint Why use PowerPoint? Late study: Students put high esteem on PowerPoint in territories of learning and inspiration (Tang & Austin) Does our utilization of innovation in the classroom advance understudy learning? At the point when is PowerPoint superfluous?

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Effective PowerPoint Presentations What makes a PowerPoint presentation viable from a configuration viewpoint? What are qualities of insufficiently composed PowerPoint presentations?

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Why is Design Important? Upgrades the viability of your presentations Helps convey your fundamental focuses

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Best Practices for PPT Design Simplicity Readability Interactivity

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Simplicity: Information Overload Notes capacity versus data over-burden on screen Studies have demonstrated “More is not better” as far as utilizing innovation to instruct Avoid Information Overload PowerPoint master Cliff Atkinson, writer of Beyond Bullet Points says, "When you over-burden your crowd, you close down the dialog that is an essential piece of choice making." He indicates research by instructive therapists: "When you evacuate intriguing yet unessential words and pictures from a screen, you can build the gathering of people\'s capacity to recollect the data by 189% and the capacity to apply the data by 109%.”

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Simplicity: Information Overload Notes capacity versus data over-burden on screen “More is not better” in utilizing innovation to educate

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Simplicity: Information Overload PowerPoint master Cliff Atkinson, writer of Beyond Bullet Points: "When you over-burden your crowd, you close down the dialog that is a vital piece of choice making."

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Simplicity: Information Overload Atkinson: "When you uproot fascinating yet immaterial words and pictures from a screen, you can expand the crowd\'s capacity to recall the data by 189% and the capacity to apply the data by 109%.”

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Simplicity: Less is More Keep words at the very least 6 x 6 rule 6 focuses per slide 6 words for each point Keep slides at the very least 3 slides for every moment max

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Simplicity: Less is More Keep textual styles straightforward 2 max for each page, including minor departure from a solitary textual style compactness of textual styles & substitutions

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Simplicity: Less is More White space is your companion Avoid pictures or representation in foundation Avoid brilliantly hued foundations

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Simplicity: Skip the Tricks Minimize or stay away from vivified messages, sounds, and extravagant transitionsâ  Can be viable in specific circumstances, yet frequently divert your gathering of people from your primary focuses

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Simplicity: Graphics Word craftsmanship: When words get to be workmanship, and when that’s not so much something worth being thankful for WordArt Not generally Your Friend

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Simplicity: Graphics Options for making illustrations, outlines, and charts: “Smart Art” in PowerPoint

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Simplicity: Graphics

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Simplicity: Graphics http://sxc.hu/site for delineations & photographs

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Readability: Basic Design Theory C ontrast R epetition A lignment P roximity Also referred to visual creators as “CRAP” or “PARC” Principles

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Readability: Contrast Strong differentiation includes “visual interest” and keeps your students’ consideration Makes content more alluring Highlights the most vital ideas Difference suggests significance

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Readability: Contrast Strong complexity includes “visual interest” and keeps your students’ consideration Makes content more appealing Highlights the most critical ideas Difference infers significance

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Readability: Contrast Using hues to make complexity Black content on white foundation White content on dark foundation

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Readability: Repetition includes rehashing configuration ideas on every page Creates solidarity and consistency Readers take subjective hints from consistency in configuration

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Readability: Repetition Professional outline work on: marking Templates In PowerPoint Five example formats on HWI site marked for Farmer School of Business

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Readability: Alignment Nothing ought to be set on a page discretionarily Every component ought to have some visual association with another component on the page Creates a spotless, new, refined look

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Readability: Alignment Nothing ought to be put on a page self-assertively • Every component ought to have some visual association with another component on the page Creates a perfect, crisp, advanced look

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Readability: Alignment Ideally every article (illustrations, photographs, or content) ought to be adjusted to different items Includes vertical and level arrangement

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Readability: Alignment Horizontal arrangement Ideally every article (design, photographs, or content) ought to be adjusted to different articles Includes vertical and flat arrangement Vertical arrangement

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Readability: Proximity Group comparative things together Similar to paragraphing in composing Helps perusers sort out data Using slugs and layouts to accomplish “proximity” in outline

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Readability: Type Size Make beyond any doubt your textual styles are decipherable and sufficiently huge “Floor test" for meaningfulness

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Readability: Type Size Preview your presentation in the classroom Should have the capacity to peruse the slides from the room\'s back

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Readability: Type Style Avoid all tops serif versus sans serif

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Readability: Focal Point Related to complexity and white space Use outline deliberately to make and accentuate your message

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Readability: Focal Point Images Eyes move through and through, left to right Logos typically at lower right

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Interactivity: Student Learning Inquiry-based learning Interactive PowerPoint: An ironic expression? Thoughts for intelligence Pose inquiries Fill in reactions Have understudies take notes reacting to addresses on PPT Post notes to Bb site O

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