REFLECTIONS ON ETHOS AND CULTURE JOHN MACBEATH University of Cambridge .


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REFLECTIONS ON ETHOS AND CULTURE JOHN MACBEATH University of Cambridge. ETHOS. CULTURE. ETHOS. CULTURE AND STRUCTURE. PISA The learning Environment and the organisation of Schooling (2003). Ireland US UK Finland. 50. 100. 0.
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REFLECTIONS ON ETHOS AND CULTURE JOHN MACBEATH University of Cambridge

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ETHOS CULTURE

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ETHOS CULTURE AND STRUCTURE

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PISA The learning Environment and the association of Schooling (2003) Ireland US UK Finland 50 100 0 % of difference in execution clarified by ethos and financial variables

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Television camera AntI-truancy lit up boards Full length dividers and entryways Smoke alerts Hand driers Concealed works

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AN ETHOS OF ACHIEVEMENT A CULTURE OF LEARNING

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THE LEARNING WEDDING CAKE System learning Professional learning student learning

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HOW GOOD IS OUR ETHOS?

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DOING SCHOOL Imagine yourself on a ship cruising over an obscure ocean, to an obscure goal. A grown-up would be frantic to know where he is going. In any case, a youngster just knows he is going to school...The diagram is neither accessible nor justifiable to him... Quickly, the day by day life on board dispatch turns into exceptionally vital ... The day by day errands, the requests, the examinations, turn into the truth, not the voyage, nor the goal. (Mary Alice White, 1971)

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Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson Copyright 1993 Watterson/Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate

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TAMING THE WILD… .. \'Kids come to class with a hundred dialects and leave with one." The Carpe Vitam Project, 2002 … AND WILDING THE TAME

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THE HOLE IN THE WALL Research papers by Sugata Mitra on MIE

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Pavan at a Madangir stand with his goat

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Girl in town Kalse, Sindhudurg region, and her composition following 3 hours of seeing a PC surprisingly .

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Intelligence is recognizing what to do when you don\'t comprehend what to do Jean Piaget

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CONFIDENT UNCERTAINTY Learning begins from the joint affirmation of insufficiency and numbness… There is no other place for figuring out how to begin. A compelling learner, or learning society, would one say one is that is not hesitant to concede this recognition, furthermore has some trust in its capacity to develop in comprehension and ability, with the goal that perplexity is changed into authority… (Claxton, 2000)

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CONFIDENT UNCERTAINTY How would you tell when you\'re out of imperceptible ink? On the off chance that Barbie is so well known, why do you need to get her companions? What happens in the event that you get terrified half to death twice? Why do psychics need to approach you for your name? Why do kamikaze pilots wear protective caps? Alright, so what\'s the speed of dim?

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DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENCE "Neurons associate parts of our brains with each other however no links made of neurons wrap from individual to individual. We discuss thoughts. We share bits of knowledge. We pool memories." (Perkins, 2004 p.22)

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DEVELOPING A LEARNING CULTURE Delivering the educational modules Discussing purposes and goals of learning Pupils conceiving markers of accomplishment Pupils as assessors their own and others\' work Pupils as determiners of learning Pupils as learning accomplices

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Social Capital Social holding Social crossing over Social connecting

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Warum muss Ich in pass on Schule gehen? "In school you meet individuals from not quite the same as yourself from various foundations, youngsters you can watch, converse with, make inquiries, for instance somebody from Turkey or Vietnam, a faithful Catholic or an unmitigated nonbeliever, young men and young ladies, a numerical superstar, a kid in a wheelchair... I trust entire heartedly that the open school is there above all else to unite youngsters and to help them to figure out how to live in a way that our political society so gravely needs." (Von Hentig, p.47)

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authoritative limit Human capital

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A CULTURE OF LEARNING Making taking in a question of consideration Making taking in a protest of discussion Making taking in a protest of reflection Making taking in a protest of learning

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The drive field A culture of learning

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TOXINS ideas dismisses or stolen constant bellyaching reactions being overlooked being judged being overdirected not being listened to being misjudged Southworth, 2000

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NUTRIENTS being esteemed being energized being saw being trusted being listened to being regarded Southworth, 2000

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THE TREASURE WITHIN "Some way or another instructors have overlooked the critical association amongst educators and understudies. We listen to outside specialists to advise us, and, thus ignore the fortune in our own one of a kind patios – the understudies." (Soo Hoo, 1993, p. 389)

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Tuning into the mystery harmonies Pupil delegates at workforce conferences Pupils graffiti board in staffroom Pupils create learning, evaluation, professions booklets Pupil agents in workforce conferences Pupils on staff determination and arrangement boards Pupils on investigation groups Headteacher parliamentary inquiries The Bubble Box

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Pupils choose. Grown-ups bolster. The stepping stool of interest (from Shultz in Democratic Learning, MacBeath and Moos.) cooperation Adults and understudies choose together Adults counsel and consider student sees. conference Adults counsel understudies then choose. embellishment Adults utilize understudies as enrichment control Adults choose. Illuminate understudies.

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A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government mediation Local school administration

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A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government intercession Intermediate support and balance? School self-governance, school decision

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A GLOBAL MOVEMENT Government: supplier and quality assurer The responsibility change interface School: consistence and subversion

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LIFE IN A PSEUDO ENVIRONMENT The Manufactured emergency The change fantasy The glorious myth The post truth political environment

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The change hallucination "Nine and an a large portion of our days, class on Saturday, school amid the late spring and two hours of homework every night are non-negotiable..."If you\'re off the transport you\'re working" says Feinberg...... Every morning understudies get a worksheet of maths, rationale and word issues for them to fathom in the free minutes that show up amid the day." Teachers convey phones with toll free numbers and are accessible as needs be 24 hours a day to answer any worries their understudies may have. "Ten calls a night may seem like a drag", says Feinberg," yet everybody goes to bed prepared for the following school day." (No Excuses, Lessons from High Performing Schools)

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HOW MYTHS GAIN INERTIA \'In the 70s and 80s no one was occupied with accomplishment in schools\'. (ht auxiliary school) \'In the no so distant past some time ago instructors assumed no liability for kids\' learning by any means. They had no desire of them by any means.\' (essential ht) \'Take a gander at any school statement of purpose and you will locate a backwards relationship amongst\'s accomplishment and minding\'

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PISA The learning Environment and the association of Schooling (2003) Ireland US UK Finland 50 100 0 % of difference in execution clarified by ethos and financial components

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GREEDY WORK The undertaking of driving a school in the twenty first century can never again be completed by the gallant individual pioneer without any assistance turning schools around. It is voracious work, all devouring, requesting tenacious pinnacle execution from superleaders and no more drawn out a feasible thought. Diminish Gronn, The New Work of Educational Leaders: Changing Leadership Practice in an Era of School Reform, 2003

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THE POST TRUTH POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT Public conclusion is formed because of individuals\' maps or pictures of the world, and not to the world itself. Mass political cognizance does not relate to the real environment but rather to a delegate pseudo-environment. At the point when arrangements must be struck and bargains made in the interest of expansive purposes, Presidents have a tendency to incline toward duplicity over training. Eric Alterman, The Nation 2004

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THE SUNDAY TIMES July 13, 2003 LET PUPILS HIRE THEIR TEACHERS says Labor guide Pupils ought to be offered energy to apoint their own particular instructors, as per one of the administration\'s most senior training consultants.

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LIVING WITH PARADOX apply given criteria dodge botches convey comes about now take after the standards contend hold control survey people self assess go out on a limb/develop think long haul be adaptable work together share initiative energize cooperation

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SEVEN KEY PRINCIPLES Justice .. as a first unalienable standard Reciprocity .. Watching the me-as well you-too guideline Steadfastness … .in clutching what makes a difference Solidarity … in the quality of the aggregate Diversity .. The enhancement of contrast Stewardship .. .Dynamic sympathy toward the common asset Accountability … for the ethical objective

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"Not everything that tallies can be checked. What\'s more, not everything that can be tallied, checks." Albert Einstein

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