School Wellbeing Rules to Avoid Inadvertent Wounds and Brutality.


77 views
Uploaded on:
Category: Product / Service
Description
School Health Guidelines to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence ... Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000. Rate of Schools ...
Transcripts
Slide 1

School Health Guidelines to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence

Slide 3

Injuries Kill More Children and Adolescents Than All Diseases Combined Source: CDC, 2000 Vital Statistics

Slide 4

1 demise 41 hospitalizations 1,100 crisis division visits The Injury Pyramid 5.5 million yearly visits to crisis offices (kids matured 5-14). 20 million youngsters and youths/year have wounds requiring medicinal consideration or limited movement; $17 billion/year in restorative expenses.

Slide 5

Adolescent Violence From 1990 to 1998, the juvenile manslaughter rate dropped 28%. The U.S. youngster crime rate (2.6/100,000) is 5 times that of 25 other industrialized countries joined. Among youths matured 16 to 19 in 1995: 1 in 10 was a casualty of savage wrongdoing. >100,000 were captured for fierce violations. 2,944 were murder casualties.

Slide 6

Suicide More than 1,700 teenagers matured 15-19 complete suicide every year. In 2001: 19% of secondary school understudies considered suicide. 15% made a suicide arrangement. 9% endeavored suicide. 3% made an endeavor requiring restorative consideration.

Slide 7

Percentage of US High School Students Involved in Violence-Related Behaviors, 2001 Behavior % of Students Carried a weapon* 17.4 Carried a gun* 5.7 In a physical fight** 33.2 *In the 30 days before the study. **In the 12 months before the review. Source: CDC, National Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Slide 8

Percentage of US High School Students Engaging in Unsafe Behaviors, 2001 Behavior % of Students Rarely or never wore seatbelts 14.1 Rarely or never wore bicycle 84.7 helmets* Rode with driver who had been 30.7 drinking alcohol** Drove in the wake of drinking alcohol** 13.3 *Among understudies who rode bikes in the 12 months before overview. **In the 30 days before the overview. Source: CDC, National Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Slide 9

Injuries Occur Everywhere

Slide 10

Why Focus on School? Schools are Places of Living and Learning

Slide 11

Injuries and Violence in the School Environment 80% of primary school understudies visit a school medical caretaker for damage in a 2 year time frame. 10-25% of youngster and pre-adult wounds happen at school: 4 million school damage casualties for every year. School-related wounds bringing about hospitalization: Falls (43%). Sports exercises (34%). Strikes (10%).

Slide 12

Injuries and Violence in School Most school wounds are minor: 6% of EMS episodes. 1 in 400 damage fatalities.

Slide 13

High School Students Who Felt excessively Unsafe, making it impossible to Go to School, U.S., 1993-2001 Source: Youth Risk Behavior Survey, CDC

Slide 14

Violent Deaths Among School-Aged Children, 1994-1999

Slide 15

What Are Schools Doing to Prevent Injuries and Violence?

Slide 16

Percentage of Schools with Specific Safety Policies, by Level Type of Policy Elementary Middle/JHS Sr. High Hall screens 70% 77% 82% Bathroom screens 60% 57% 59% Check sacks, lockers 18% 38% 45% Uniformed police 6% 19% 30% Surveillance cameras 12% 21% 24% Require garbs 21% 28% 10% Metal indicators 3% 10% Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 17

School Policies: Unintentional Injury More than 94% of schools examine and keep up: Fire quenchers. Athletic offices and hardware. Lobbies, stairs, and general classrooms. Kitchen offices and hardware. Play area offices and hardware. School transports. Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 18

School Policies: Unintentional Injury 85% of schools investigate and keep up smoke locators. 81% of schools investigate and keep up science labs, workshops, and workmanship rooms. Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 19

Percentage of Schools Requiring Unintentional Injury, Violence and Suicide Prevention Education, by School Level Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 20

Health Education Median hours showing brutality counteractive action: 4-5 hours/year. Middle hours instructing accidental damage counteractive action: 4-5 hours/year. Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 21

Percentage of Schools Teaching Skills Related to Violence and Suicide Prevention in no less than One Required Class or Course Techniques to keep away from interpersonal clashes/battles: 95%. Outrage administration: 92%. Taking care of anxiety in solid ways: 88%. Dating savagery: 62%. Rape: 61%. Perceiving stressors/indications of melancholy: 42%. What to do on the off chance that somebody is deduction about suicide: 38%. Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 22

Percentage of Schools Teaching Topics Related to Unintentional Injury Prevention in no less than One Required Class or Course Protective hardware (biking, skating, sports): 86%. Fire wellbeing: 84%. Street/transportation security: 80%. Water wellbeing: 66%. Emergency treatment/CPR: 56%. Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study, 2000

Slide 23

How Were the Guidelines Developed?

Slide 24

Guidelines Development Process Literature survey. Master board: Is there fitting confirmation ? How viable is the technique? (impact size) How practical is the procedure? What need ought to the methodology be appointed? Office and association survey. Amendment. MMWR production. Scattering and dispersion.

Slide 25

The Breadth of the Guidelines Unintentional damage Violence Suicide Social environment Physical environment Health instruction Physical training Family/people group Staff advancement Health administrations Crisis reaction Elementary Middle/JHS High school

Slide 26

Health training Family/people group Physical instruction inclusion Health administrations Health advancement for staff Nutrition administrations Healthy school environment Counseling, mental, & social administrations Coordinated School Health Programs

Slide 27

Recommendations to Prevent Unintentional Injuries, Violence, and Suicide 1. Social environment 2. Physical environment 3. Wellbeing training 4. Physical instruction and physical action programs 5. Wellbeing administrations 6. Emergency reaction 7. Family and group association 8. Staff advancement

Slide 28

(1) Establish a Social Environment that Promotes Safety and Prevents Unintentional Injuries and Violence Ensure high scholarly measures: Provide authoritative initiative to advance the scholastic accomplishment of all understudies. Set up a solid scholarly statement of purpose. Build up scholastic bolster instruments. Give chances to understudies to experience achievement.

Slide 29

(1) Establish a Social Environment that Promotes Safety and Prevents Unintentional Injuries and Violence Encourage association with school: Develop prosocial standards (dislike harassing, advance supportive acts). Include workforce, staff, understudies, families, and group individuals in all parts of school administration.

Slide 30

(1) Establish a Social Environment that Promotes Safety and Prevents Unintentional Injuries and Violence Develop, actualize, and uphold composed arrangements: Support peacefulness and shield all from badgering, brutality, or separation. Accentuate positive practices expected of understudies. Unequivocally state, impart, and actualize results of approach infringement.

Slide 31

(1) Establish a Social Environment that Promotes Safety and Prevents Unintentional Injuries and Violence Designate a man to facilitate security exercises. Have a school security board of trustees or school wellbeing chamber address security issues. Frequently evaluate projects and strategies.

Slide 32

(1) Establish a Social Environment that Promotes Safety and Prevents Unintentional Injuries and Violence Integrate anticipation of accidental wounds and savagery in: Academic classes. Occupation authentications. Professional training and school-to-work programs.

Slide 33

(2) Provide a Safe Physical Environment to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence Conduct standard security and peril appraisals.

Slide 34

(2) Provide a Safe Physical Environment to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence Maintain structures, hardware, and grounds: Uncluttered ways. Slip-safe floors. Legitimate capacity of toxic substances and compound dangers. Adequate lighting. Emergency treatment hardware accessible all through school.

Slide 35

(2) Provide a Safe Physical Environment to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence Actively regulate all understudy exercises, particularly in: Hallways. Bathrooms. Play areas. Shop and professional training exercises.

Slide 36

(2) Provide a Safe Physical Environment to Prevent Unintentional Injuries and Violence Ensure that the school is free from weapons: Improve physical environment. Actualize proper disciplinary measures. Work with families and groups. Manage understudies and screen grounds. Consider ecological changes (fencing, constraining number of doorways, security advances).

Slide 37

(3) Implement Health and Safety Education Curricula and Instruction Choose projects and educational module grounded in principle or with proof of adequacy. Execute educational program steady with national and state benchmarks: Part of extensive wellbeing instruction. Satisfactory time. Successive from preschool through secondary school. Formatively and socially fitting.

Slide 38

(3) Implement Health and Safety Education Curricula and Instruction Use dynamic learning systems and intuitive showing strategies: Proactive classroom administration. Rehashed chances to practice abilities. Include families, group individuals, and group assets.

Slide 39

(3) Implement Health and Safety Education Curricula and Instruction Provide satisfactory staffing and assets: Budget. Offices. Staff advancement. Class time.

Slide 40

(4) Provide Safe Physical Education and Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs Promote harm anticipation and peacefulness through physical educa

Recommended
View more...