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1. What are a few courses in which male conceptive cells in dust may reach ... Individuals who have gardens or houseplants regularly develop additional plants by making ...
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Slide 1

Area Outline Section 24-1 24–1 Reproduction With Cones and Flowers A. Alternation of Generations B. Life Cycle of Gymnosperms 1. Pollen Cones and Seed Cones 2. Pollination 3. Fertilization and Development C. Structure of Flowers 1. Sepals and Petals 2. Stamens and Carpels D. Life Cycle of Angiosperms E. Pollination F. Fertilization in Angiosperms

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Compare/Contrast Table Section 24-1 Comparing Wind-pollinated and Animal-pollinated Plants Characteristics Pollination strategy Relative proficiency of fertilization technique Plant sorts Reproductive organs Adaptations that advance fertilization Wind-pollinated Plants Wind fertilization Less effective Mostly gymnosperms and a few angiosperms Cones Pollination drop Animal-pollinated Plants Vector fertilization More productive Angiosperms Flowers Bright hues, sweet nectar

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Figure 24–4 The Life Cycle of a Gymnosperm Section 24-1

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Figure 24–5 The Structure of a Flower Stamen Carpel Stigma Anther Style Filament Ovary Petal Ovule Sepal Section 24-1

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Figure 24–7 The Life Cycle of an Angiosperm Pollen grains (N) (male gametophyte) Anther (2N) Stigma Pollen tubes Style Haploid cell (N) Ovary Embryo sac (N) (female gametophyte) Egg cell Mature sporophyte Sperm Pollen tube Endosperm cores Endosperm (3N) Embryo (2N) Seedling (2N) (new sporophyte) Endosperm Zygote (2N) Seed coat Fruit Section 24-1 Haploid (N) Diploid (2N) MEIOSIS Ovule FERTILIZATION

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Video Life Cycle of Angiosperms

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Section Outline Section 24-2 24–2 Seed Development and Germination A.Seed and Fruit Development B.Seed Dispersal 1.Dispersal by Animals 2.Dispersal by Wind and Water C.Seed Dormancy D.Seed Germination

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Interest Grabber proceeded with Section 24-3 1. For a nursery worker, what may be favorable position of developing plants from cuttings instead of from seeds? 2. Herbaceous plants, for example, coleus, root quicker than do woody plants, for example, willow. How might you clarify this distinction? 3. How might plants developed from cuttings contrast with the plant from which the cuttings were taken? Why might this be favorable position for a cultivator?

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Section Outline Section 24-3 24–3 Plant Propagation and Agriculture A. Vegetative Reproduction B. Plant Propagation 1. Cuttings 2. Grafting and Budding C. Agriculture 1. Worldwide Patterns of Agriculture 2. Changes in Agriculture

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Compare/Contrast Table A length of stem that incorporates parallel buds is cut from the guardian plant and incompletely covered in soil or attaching blend to flourish. A bit of stem is cut from the guardian plant and joined to another plant. A bit of sidelong bud is cut from the guardian plant and joined to another plant. Segment 24-3 Comparing Plant Propagation Methods Method Procedure Cuttings Grafting Budding

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Internet Go Online Links from the writers on hereditarily outlining blossoms Interactive test Articles on farming For connections on seed structure and capacity, go to www.SciLinks.org and enter the Web Code as takes after: cbn-7242.

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Section 1 Answers Interest Grabber Answers 1. What are some routes in which male regenerative cells in dust may achieve female conceptive cells? Conceivable answers: dust is carried on the wind, by creatures, or by moving water. 2. How does the dust hold fast to the female regenerative structure? The highest point of the female regenerative structure (disgrace) is sticky. 3. Many individuals experience unfavorably susceptible responses when dust grains enter their respiratory frameworks. How would you think the dust achieved their bodies? Dust is carried on the wind; when individuals breathe in, they take in the dust. Individuals can likewise get dust into their bodies by touching initial a plant and afterward their appearances. 4. How may individuals who are oversensitive to dust lessen their presentation to it? Understudies may propose that individuals wash their hands in the wake of taking care of plants or stay inside when the dust number is high.

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Section 2 Answers Interest Grabber Answers 1. Name three natural products that you have eaten. Conceivable answers: apples, strawberries, grapefruit, oranges 2. Portray any seeds you found in the natural products. Little seeds in the apple center, modest seeds on the outside of berries, substantial seeds inside grapefruit areas, littler seeds inside orange segments 3. What capacity do you think the products of the soil serve for a plant? Organic product pulls in creatures that spread seeds; seeds permit new plants to develop.

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Section 3 Answers Interest Grabber Answers 1. For a cultivator, what may be preference of developing plants from cuttings as opposed to from seeds? Developing plants from cuttings is quicker than developing them from seeds. Additionally, there is no compelling reason to search for seeds. 2. Herbaceous plants, for example, coleus, root quicker than do woody plants, for example, willow. How might you clarify this difference? Woody plants develop gradually, so it bodes well that they would create roots gradually, as well. 3. How might plants developed from cuttings contrast with the plant from which the cuttings were taken? Why might this be preference for a nursery worker? They would be much the same as the first plant. This is favorable position if the cultivator needs numerous indistinguishable plants.

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End of Custom Shows This slide is deliberately clear.

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