SOC1023G Social Problems: Unit 1 Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist .


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Wednesday, February 15, 2012.
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SOC1023G Social Problems: Unit 1 Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist References Denisoff, R. S., Callahan, O., & Levine, M. H. (1974). Hypotheses and ideal models in contemporary human science . Itasca, IL: F. E. Peacock Publishers. De Santo, C. P. (1985). The human science of social issues. In C. P. De Santo and M. M. Poloma (Eds.), Social issues: Christian Perspectives (pp. 2-17). Winston-Salem, NC: Hunter Textbooks. Hess, B. B., Markson, E. W., & Stein, P. J. (1993). Humanism (fourth ed.). New York: Macmillian Publishing. Kuhn, T. S. (1970). The structure of logical unrests (second ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Factories, C. W. (1959). The sociological creative energy . New York: Oxford University Press. Mooney, L. A., Knox, D., & Schacht, C. (2000). Understanding social issues (second ed.). Cincinnati, OH: Wadsworth. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Devotions The poor you will dependably have with you . . . Matthew 26:11a (NIV) © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Devotions Let us not get to be distinctly exhausted in doing great, for at the best possible time we will procure a reap on the off chance that we don\'t surrender. Thusly, as we have opportunity, given us a chance to do great to all individuals . . . . Galatians 6:9-10a (NIV) © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Note This is the most troublesome address in this course. Numerous new ideas are presented. These ideas will turn out to be more natural as you advance through the course. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist What is a social issue? Essential components of social issues Objective component We get to be distinctly mindful of a social condition through our faculties See the destitute Hear the gunfire in the roads See battered ladies in doctor\'s facility crisis rooms Hear unemployment insights © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Subjective component Belief that a specific social condition is destructive to society and that it should be changed Crime Drug habit Poverty Racism Violence © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist By consolidating these target and subjective components, we touch base at the accompanying definition: A SOCIAL PROBLEM is a social condition that a fragment of society perspectives as hurtful to individuals from society and needing cure (Mooney, Knox, & Schacht, 2000 p. 3) . © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist The Sociological Imagination (Mills, 1959 pp. 8-11) C. W. Plants built up a method for taking a gander at social issues Personal inconveniences versus open issues Personal inconveniences Private matters, constrained to parts of day by day life of which a man is straightforwardly - regularly agonizingly - mindful Public issues Arise from elements outside of one\'s close to home control, yet that eventually influence every day life, for example, business cycles or wars (Hess, Markson, & Stein, 1993 p. 5) © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Example: Divorce If you are included in a separation, that is an individual inconvenience If over 25% of all relational unions end in separation, that is an open issue = social issue © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist As sociologists, we are to precisely characterize what is and is not a social issue. A social condition may not be a social issue in one period and afterward get to be distinctly one amid another time. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Example: High School Dropouts Until the finish of the 1950\'s, this was not a social issue There were plentiful, generously compensated business open doors for the less taught Usually these open doors required strenuous work or potentially exhausting dreary movements Currently, there is an absence of work openings that are both generously compensated and require not as much as a secondary school training © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Our present way of life, which the greater part of us would not have any desire to surrender, requires a more instructed work constrain. Be that as it may, what are we going to do with a present secondary school populace that has a 25% dropout rate? © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist In my supposition, we are set out toward a future two class society- - not separated by race or family foundation - but rather partitioned by the informed versus the undereducated. Tragically, this social condition will be the consequence of decisions uninhibitedly made by most without bounds undereducated populace. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Elements of Social Structure and Culture Elements of social structure- - alludes to the way society is sorted out Institutions Is a built up persevering example of social connections Family, religion, legislative issues, financial matters, and instruction © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Social gatherings Is characterized as at least two individuals who have a typical personality, cooperate, and shape a social relationship. Essential Intimate and casual collaborations Secondary Task-arranged and portrayed by generic and formal cooperations © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Statuses Is a position a man involves inside a social gathering and along these lines inside the structure of society Ascribed status Is one that society doles out, over which an individual has no control (sex, race, and so forth.) Achieved status Is allocated on the premise of some trademark or conduct over which the individual has some control (parent, college alumni, and so forth.) © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Roles The arrangement of rights, commitments, and desires related with a status Roles manage conduct and help anticipate the conduct of others © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Elements of culture- - alludes to the implications and lifestyles that describe a general public Beliefs Refer to definitions and clarifications about what is thought to be genuine Secondhand smoke hurts nonsmokers © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Values Social assentions about what is viewed as great and terrible, good and bad, attractive and undesirable Crime abuses the estimations of genuineness, private property, and peacefulness © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Norms and approvals Norms are socially characterized tenets of conduct Folkways Laws Mores Sanctions are social results for fitting in with or disregarding standards Positive authorizations Negative assents Informal approvals Formal assents © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Symbols Is something that speaks to something else Without images, we couldn\'t speak with each other or live as social creatures Examples Language Gestures Objects that convey importance comprehended by the individuals from a general public © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist In this course you have to figure out what to look like at the world as a humanist . © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Sociology (De Santo, 1985 p. 2) As a science tries to comprehend the powers working in the public eye Forces that hold it together Forces that destroy it © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Paradigm (Denisoff, Callahan, & Levine 1974 p. 1-3) Model or example of deduction Taken-for-allowed thoughts and suppositions not discussed by individuals from a logical train Once a worldview is built up, researchers take part in what Kuhn (1970) calls "cleaning up operations" the worry of one gathering of occasions and certainties over another The endeavor to show assention between the worldview and reality The further refinement of the worldview © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Sociology , as a science, has not built up a solitary overwhelming worldview. It as of now acknowledges three noteworthy ideal models. Right now a fourth one is being considered. We won\'t study the fourth worldview in this course. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Some sociological reading material utilize the term hypothetical points of view set up of standards. In sociological hypothesis, points of view are a sub-class of standards. For general talk in this course, the two terms will be utilized conversely. © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist Review the Paradigm . . . Examination Table (this was a perusing necessity for Unit 1) © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist The Table records three Paradigms Order Pluralist Conflict © 1998-2002 by Ronald Keith Bolender

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Unit 1: Thinking about Social Problems as a Sociologist One Perspective (the term utilized as a part of our readings for Unit 1) is recorded under every Paradigm Structural-Functionalism Listed under the Order Paradigm Symbolic-In

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