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Food & Beverage Overview.


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Food & Beverage Overview What does the career path look like? Country Clubs Maps & Guides Lodging Retirement Communities Restaurants Sporting Events Travel Agencies Contract Food Service Airlines Travel & Tourism Hospitality Travel and Tourism Industries
Transcripts
Slide 1

Nourishment & Beverage Overview What does the profession way resemble?

Slide 2

Country Clubs Maps & Guides Lodging Retirement Communities Restaurants Sporting Events Travel Agencies Contract Food Service Airlines Travel & Tourism Hospitality

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Travel and Tourism Industries

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Hospitality Industries

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The Hospitality Industry Lodging Food administration Clubs Cruise boats Gaming Theme parks Sports and diversion Travel

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The Hospitality Business Lodging – putting heads on beds Many U.S. markets are experienced Expansion and development abroad Food administration – placing cheeks in seats What might you want to eat? Where might you want to meet? Development and development abroad

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11.4M rooms overall 3M rooms in U.S. Abating in U.S. Exemptions; club, restricted administration, timeshare Continued extension Strong development $1 billion/day deals 10.2M representatives 12M in 2006 1/2 of all grown-ups/day eat in eateries 44% of nourishment $ spent in eateries Hospitality Industry Numbers Lodging Food Service

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Where are the occupations? Proficient Operations administration, money, bookkeeping, HR, client relations, showcasing, sustenance science Corporate Marketing, business improvement, HR, preparing, quality certification, land, bookkeeping, obtaining Entrepreneurial Owner, administrator, franchisor

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Food Service Eating and drinking places Quick administration eateries (QSR) Full administration eateries/bars White table material eateries/bars Lodging nourishment administration Education sustenance administration Employee nourishment administration Health care Recreational sustenance administration Off-reason providing food

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Banquet chief Bartender/mixed drink server Broiler cook Busperson Counter individual Dining room supervisor Dishwasher Executive culinary specialist Expediter Food & refreshment chief Food server Fry/Sautã© cook Host/entertainer Kitchen director Pantry cook Pastry gourmet expert Restaurant director Sous culinary specialist Storeroom individual Unit administrator Restaurant Industry Positions

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Hospitality Careers The business offers more profession choices than most The work is differed There are numerous chances to be inventive This is a “people” business

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Hospitality Careers Hospitality occupations are not nine-to-five occupations There are open doors for long haul vocation development There are advantages connected with numerous friendliness occupations Hospitality employments can be naturally fulfilling and important

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The Down Side Long hours Nontraditional calendars Pressure Low starting pay rates Frequent movement

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Lodging Careers

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Food Service Careers

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Chain Operations Better preparing More open doors for headway Better advantages Frequent migration More control by administration Bonus arrangements effect pay

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Independent Operations More opportunities to be innovative More control Better learning situations Less employer stability Fewer chances for progression Harder to market and offer

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Foodservice Industry Commercial Foodservices Institutional Foodservices Military Foodservices

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Foodservice Industry Commercial Foodservices Restaurants Lunchrooms Cafeterias Fast sustenance eateries Hotel foodservice operations Food stands Social food providers

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Foodservice Industry Institutional Foodservices Hospitals Nursing homes Schools & universities Correctional offices Employee cafeterias Airline cooking Surface transportation catering

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Foodservice Industry Military Foodservices Military bases Combat foodservices Officers clubs Cafeterias

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Restaurant Industry The National Restaurant Association [NRA] characterizes the eatery business as that which envelops all dinners and snacks arranged far from home, including every single takeout supper and drinks.

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Restaurant Industry Restaurant industry deals were conjecture to reach $ 399.0 billion in 2001, an increment of 5.2 throughout the year 2000.

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Restaurant Industry On a normal day in 2001, the eatery business will post normal offers of $1.1 billion

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Restaurant Industry Sales at full administration eateries are conjecture to reach $143.3 billion and deals at fast administration [fast foods] eateries are figure to reach $ 112.0 billion.

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Restaurant Industry The general effect of the eatery business is required to reach $ 1 trillion in 2001. This incorporates deals in related businesses, for example, horticulture, transportation, wholesale exchange and sustenance fabricating.

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Restaurant Industry Sales: $ 399 billion – normal $1.1 billion on a run of the mill day Locations: 844,000 – more than 54 billion suppers will be eaten in eateries and school and work cafeterias.

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Restaurant Industry Employees: 11.3 million – more than 8 percent of those utilized in the United States, which makes the business the biggest boss other than government.

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Food-and-beverage deals [billions $]

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Restaurant Industry 33% of all grown-ups in the United States have worked in the eatery business eventually amid their lives Per-individual check found the middle value of $4.72 in 1999 Average unit deals in 1998 were $ 601,000 at full administration eateries and $555,000 at constrained administration [fast-food] eateries.

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Distribution of Restaurant Customer Traffic [1998]

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Restaurant Industry Restaurant Industry stays to be exceptionally aggressive Three out of four purchasers report that they have a greater number of eateries to browse today than they did two years prior. Eateries are giving careful consideration to outline, dã©cor and climate

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Restaurant Industry: Ranking of Consumer Choices Food and Service Physical setting Moods and Impressions

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Restaurant Industry: Quick Service Intense rivalry Convenience is number one component Carryout or conveyance business sector Time reserve funds supper alternatives Ever-changing shopper needs Shortage of work Training needs

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Restaurant Industry: Full Service Tied to economy Baby-blast era Increased rivalry Importance of rehash clients Portion sizes Dietary needs

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Restaurant Industry: Growth in Other Segments Managed administrations [1%] Educational organizations [4.4%] Recreational administrations [3.3%] Transportation [3.8%] Health care [2.2%] Lodging spots [2.7%] Military [2.2%]

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Restaurant Industry: Trends Labor lack issues Cost of giving nourishment and administration Technology issues and advantages Consumer inclinations Training Expansion .: