The Selma March and the 1965 Voting Rights Act .


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By 1965, the social liberties development under the dynamic initiative of Martin Luther King, was intending to increase political force through voting rights. Dark individuals in the South were kept from voting. Dr King chose to concentrate on the town of Selma, Alabama, where a supremacist sheriff was hindering a crusade for voter enrollment - you must be enlisted to vote with the goal that you can be given the voting sli
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Slide 1

The Selma March and the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Slide 2

By 1965, the social liberties development under the dynamic authority of Martin Luther King, was intending to increase political power through voting rights. Dark individuals in the South were kept from voting. Dr King chose to concentrate on the town of Selma, Alabama, where a bigot sheriff was hindering a crusade for voter enlistment - you must be enrolled to vote with the goal that you can be given the voting slip (bit of paper) that you would use to give your vote.

Slide 3

On 7 March 1965 social equality demonstrators endeavored to walk over an extension close Selma. They wanted to stroll to Montgomery, the state legislative hall, to take their dissent to the bigot Governor of Alabama, George Wallace.

Slide 4

Mr Wallace requested state troopers, some mounted on horseback, to keep the walk crossing the extension. As the marchers stooped to ask, the police splashed poisonous gas in the wake of caution them to scatter.

Slide 5

The police surged into the horde of demonstrators, clubbing men, ladies and youngsters unpredictably and splashing teargas.

Slide 7

The degree of the viciousness, demonstrated that day on televison, stunned Americans and the world.

Slide 10

Dr King required a moment walk to happen at Selma two weeks after the fact. 25,000 individuals accumulated yet this time they were ensured by government troops sent by President Johnson.

Slide 11

It was an enormous triumph for the social equality development. The occasions at Selma made the lawmakers in Washington make a move. LBJ squeezed Congress to pass a Voting Rights Act (1965) which at long last evacuated all limitations against dark individuals voting in the southern states.

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