The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Impact.


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Recorded Perspective. CMB found in 1964 by Penzias and WilsonCOBE 1989: immaculate blackbody to 1/105, essential anisotropies measuredHowever, in 1970 Sunyaev
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Slide 1

The Sunyaev-Zel\'dovich Effect Jason Glenn APS Historical Perspective Physics of the SZ Effect - - - Previous Observations & Results Bolocam Imminent Experiments Future Work References

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Historical Perspective CMB found in 1964 by Penzias and Wilson COBE 1989: impeccable blackbody to 1/10 5 , essential anisotropies measured However, in 1970 Sunyaev & Zel\'dovich anticipated the SZ impact: auxiliary anisotropies in the CMB T CMB = 2.725 K

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Physics of the SZ Effect Mechanism & Thermal Effect CMB photons T = (1 + z ) 2.725K cosmic system group with hot ICM z ~ 0 - 3 spectator z = 0 scattered photons (more sizzling) Spectral movement Sunyaev & Zeldovich (1970) last dispersing surface z ~ 1100 CMB photons have a ~1% possibility of reverse Compton diffusing off of the ICM electrons; photon number is rationed

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Physics of the SZ Effect Functional Form y parameter Temperature shift corresponding to the gas weight, n e T e , & mass  dl CMB photon energies helped by ~ kT e/(m e c 2 ) kT e ~ 10 keV, Te ~ 10 8 K  relativistic x = h /(kT e ) f(x) is the unearthly reliance Notice that the temperature movement is redshift free  unprejudiced reviews for bunches

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Physics of the SZ Effect The Kinetic Effect: a Doppler support from the exceptional speed of the bunch Spectral twisting: Null in warm  measure motor Increment Kinetic impact is little Decrement

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Physics of the SZ Effect What the warm impact looks like Simulations, obviously!  = 2 mm "Maps" are 1 ° on a side SZ impact is an augmentation at 2 mm

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Physics of the SZ Effect The Angular Power Spectrum Secondary anisotropies can be measured free of bunch identification l is the multipole number (as in quantum mechanics); ( °) ~ 200 °/l Vertical units: T 2 – control generally measured as an overabundance fluctuation over the commotion, C l is per l – there are more autonomous multipoles at high l Dashed and dabbed lines are models The signs are little : ~ 15 mK @ 30 GHz, ~ 5 mK @ 150 GHz Tentative location in this way (more on this Friday) Green is 30 GHz, or 1 cm Pink is 150 GHz, or 2 mm

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Physics of the SZ Effect Cosmological Utility What can be measured when consolidated with different perceptions: H0 Cluster masses Cluster plenitude as a component of redshift , , w Spectral list of beginning bothers (non-Gaussianity) Cluster advancement Next, we\'ll examine SZ perceptions and a few results

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Previous Observations Images from Interferometers Image from Carlstrom bunch utilizing OVRO/BIMA interferometer at 30 GHz Spectral estimations an abstract – affirms range through RJ tail To date, just directed perceptions to huge groups Measurements of the dynamic impact will be hard, contingent upon exactness of multiband adjustment

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions?

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The plentifulness of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The sufficiency of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by group, closer view, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz.

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The sufficiency of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by bunch, frontal area, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz. Defilement by dust from foundation, lensed cosmic systems is a potential issue at 1 mm.

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The abundancy of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by bunch, frontal area, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz. Sullying by dust from foundation, lensed worlds is a potential issue at 1 mm. Practically speaking, the rakish determination achievable with each is about the same since bolometer clusters are utilized for short-wavelength perceptions and interferometers are utilized for long-wavelength perceptions.

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The plentifulness of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by bunch, frontal area, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz. Tainting by dust from foundation, lensed cosmic systems is a potential issue at 1 mm. Practically speaking, the precise determination achievable with each is about the same since bolometer exhibits are utilized for short-wavelength perceptions and interferometers are utilized for long-wavelength perceptions. 1 mm and 2 mm perceptions are important to gauge the dynamic SZ impact.

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The plentifulness of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by bunch, closer view, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz. Defilement by dust from foundation, lensed worlds is a potential issue at 1 mm. By and by, the rakish determination achievable with each is about the same since bolometer exhibits are utilized for short-wavelength perceptions and interferometers are utilized for long-wavelength perceptions. 1 mm and 2 mm perceptions are important to gauge the active SZ impact. Discharge/assimilation by the climate is not a gigantic issue at long wavelengths for interferometers in light of the fact that the commotion between telescopes is not profoundly associated.

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? The adequacy of the SZ warm impact is bigger at 30 GHz Contamination by group, closer view, and foundation radio point sources (quasars) would be an issue at 30 GHz. Tainting by dust from foundation, lensed systems is a potential issue at 1 mm. By and by, the rakish determination achievable with each is about the same since bolometer exhibits are utilized for short-wavelength perceptions and interferometers are utilized for long-wavelength perceptions. 1 mm and 2 mm perceptions are important to gauge the active SZ impact. Emanation/ingestion by the climate is not an immense issue at long wavelengths for interferometers in light of the fact that the commotion between telescopes is not very corresponded. Interestingly, air commotion is much more awful at short wavelengths – much more awful than expected!

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Some Questions What are the tradeoffs between 30 GHz (1 cm) and 150/270 GHz (2mm/1mm) perceptions? Plainly, we require both.

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Atmospheric Noise Emission, instead of retention, is the essential issue: change in the entry rate of foundation photons from water particles in the sky (and the telescope, the ground, the instrument… ) 300 m c m band The sky over Mauna Kea Emission = 1 - Transmission 2 mm 1 mm Bolocam

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Physics of the SZ Effect The Angular Power Spectrum We require all the more high-l information! Green is 30 GHz, or 1 cm Pink is 150 GHz, or 2 mm

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Bolocam Detectors Incoming Photons Absorber Weak Thermal Link Q Si 3 N 4 micromesh "bug catching network" bolometer JPL Micro Devices Lab Bath (T ≤ 270 mK)

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Bolocam Bolometers In 1878, Samuel Pierpont Langley created the bolometer. Goodness, Langley concocted a bolometer: It\'s truly a sort of thermometer Which measures the warmth From a polar bear\'s feet At a separation of a large portion of a kilometer 1 . 1 Anonymous

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Bolocam Bolometers In 1878, Samuel Pierpont Langley developed the bolometer . Gracious, Langley formulated a bolometer: It\'s truly a sort of thermometer Which measures the warmth From a polar bear\'s feet At a separation of a large portion of a kilometer 1 . 1 Anonymous With Bolocam on the CSO, we can identify a polar bear\'s foot with a S/N of one at a separation of 3 km in one second of joining time 2 . 2 (In great climate!)

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Bolocam Cryostat Instrument CSO 5 in. Central Plane Bolometer Array Collaborators (Cardiff, Caltech, JPL, & CU) P.A.R. Ade, J.E. Aguirre, J.J. Bock, S.F. Edgington, A. Goldin, S.R. Golwala, D. Haig, A.E. Lange, G.T. Laurent, P.R. Maloney, P.D. Mauskopf, P. Rossinot, J. Sayers, P. Stover, H. Nguyen 144 bolometers  = 1.1, 2.1 mm 300 mK CU Caltech JPL Cardiff Thanks to Sunil for a few representation in this address!

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Bolocam The truth of sky clamor (an absolute necessity read for scholars) "Normal" subtraction takes out 90% of the commotion, yet we require >99% with maintenance of extensive scale structure Bolocam is a bolometer-exhibit pioneer and alternate gatherings are looking to us ; we\'re just in the number one spot by ~12 months! (this part is for you, Andrew) Residual clamor and very small SZ signal! "White" clamor: extreme sky subtraction

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Imminent MM-Wave Experiments High-l Anisotropies Nils

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References A magnificent audit from an eyewitness\' point of view and the wellspring of a portion of the representation in this address: "Cosmology with the Sunyaev-Zel\'dovich Effect", Carlstrom, Holder, & Reese, ARAA, 2002, Vol. 40, pp. 643-680 H0: Cluster mass division: Cluster particular speeds:

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Long-Term Future Work Probing the material science of cosmic system bunch development Hallman & Burns, et al.

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