Today s Notes: Jan. 12, 2010 .


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Comparatives, Superlatives, and Demonstrative Adjectives. eighth Grade EnglishAdjectives and Adverbs Unit. So
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Today\'s Notes: Jan. 12, 2010 III. Comparatives and Superlatives A. Positive Adjective: Does not come close. B. Similar Adjective: Compares 2 things 1. Add –er to most words 2. Include "All the more," "Less" to a few words C. Superlative Adjective: Compares 3+ things 1. Add –est to most words 2. Include "Most," "minimum" to a few words D. Stay away from Double Comparisons (most prominent) IV. Definite Adjectives A. Whenever this, that, these, those is utilized as a descriptor B. Continuously before a thing.

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Comparatives, Superlatives, and Demonstrative Adjectives 8 th Grade English Adjectives and Adverbs Unit

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So… What have we found out about modifiers in this way?

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Review… A descriptive word is a word that adjusts, or portrays, a thing or a pronoun. A descriptive word depicts a man, place, thing, or thought. It gives more information about the thing or pronoun. A predicate descriptive word takes after a connecting verb and alters the subject of the sentence. An and an are called inconclusive articles since they allude to one of a general gathering of individuals, spots, things, or thoughts. The is known as an unequivocal article since it distinguishes particular individuals, spots, things, or thoughts.

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Isn\'t that enough?

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Today. We will take a gander at three various types of descriptive words and what they do. Comparatives Superlatives Demonstratives Sounds like fun, correct?

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Most descriptive words… Most descriptors that you keep running into are called positive modifiers. By and large, they are decent little animals. They don\'t analyze things. They simply are their identity. Enormous, thin, brilliant, proficient, willing, and so forth…

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However… There are a few descriptors that are somewhat impolite. These modifiers are called comparatives and superlatives.

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Comparatives A relative descriptive word is the point at which you think about two things. (Think co uple = two … co mparative = two ) For most short modifiers, you will add a –er to the word. For longer descriptors, include either more/less. Positive huge gets to be distinctly relative greater

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Comparative Examples: Mary is thin; Lisa is more slender. Camilla is shrewd; Lavonda is more astute. I am competent; you are more fit. Kristopher is ready, Eric is less ready.

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Superlatives are far more atrocious! A Superlative type of a descriptive word looks at more than two things or individuals! ( Think Super = best, most!) For most short modifiers, you will include a – est to the descriptive word. On the off chance that it is longer than two syllables, odds are you should utilize most/minimum and not change the modifier. Positive enormous gets to be distinctly greater (c.) and greatest (superlative)

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Superlative Examples: Mary is thin. Lisa is more slender. Katie is most slender. Camilla is shrewd. Lavonda is more intelligent. Meg is most brilliant. I am fit. You are more able. Maria is the most skilled. Kristopher is eager. Eric is less ready. Rick is the slightest willing.

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Exercise A: Tell me which type of the word in enclosures I have to utilize. Michelangelo was one of the (immense) specialists ever. He was additionally the (acclaimed) craftsman of his own time. Are his statues (great) than his works of art? Which is the (fine) statue, David or the Pieta `? Michelangelo\'s figures were (extensive) than life. Couple of works of art are (lovely) than the one on the roof of the Sistine Chapel.

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Remember… The similar type of a modifier thinks about two things or individuals. The superlative type of a modifier thinks about more than two things or individuals.

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Demonstrative Adjectives Demonstrative descriptors resemble illustrative pronouns. Ok… recall illustrative pronouns… there were four of them… What were they?

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Demonstratives This, That, These, Those… Four little words with a LOT of discourteous conduct! Why? Since they call attention to things (And didn\'t your Mama let you know not to point?)

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The definition Demonstrative descriptive words bring up something and portray things by noting the inquiries which one or which ones . In any case, hold up, isn\'t that what expressive pronouns do?

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Not Quite… Demonstrative pronouns are constantly trailed by a verb. They replace a thing. Definite descriptive words really hang out with the thing; they precede it. They accentuate which ones you are discussing.

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Check it…

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Some standards… The words here and there ought not be utilized with an illustrative modifier Not: This here painting. The question pronoun them ought not be utilized as a part of place of the illustrative pronoun those. Not: I saw them pictures.

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Exercise B: Tell me what demonstratives are utilized as a part of the accompanying sentences. You can tell that this craftsman respected Cezanne\'s work. These photos appear, somehow, Cezanne\'s impact. This doesn\'t imply that the craftsman replicated Cezanne\'s work. Could you perceive how he utilizes these hues a similar way? Doesn\'t it help you to remember those artistic creations of Cezanne\'s we recently observed?

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Remember… Demonstrative descriptive words call attention to something and depict things by noting the inquiries which one or which ones .

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So, we should recap everything so far in the unit… A modifier is a word that alters, or portrays, a thing or a pronoun. A descriptive word portrays a man, place, thing, or thought. It gives more data about the thing or pronoun. A predicate descriptive word takes after a connecting verb and alters the subject of the sentence. An and an are called inconclusive articles since they allude to one of a general gathering of individuals, spots, things, or thoughts. The is known as an unmistakable article since it distinguishes particular individuals, spots, things, or thoughts.

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And now… The relative type of a modifier thinks about two things or individuals. The superlative type of a descriptive word thinks about more than two things or individuals. Decisive descriptive words call attention to something and depict things by noting the inquiries which one or which ones .

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Mont Sainte-Victoire By Cezanne

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