W.E.B. Du Bois, 1868-1963.


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W.E.B. Du Bois, 1868-1963 W.E.B (William Edward Burghardt) Du Bois was conceived on February 23, 1863 in Incredible Barrington, Massachusetts.
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W.E.B. Du Bois, 1868-1963

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W.E.B (William Edward Burghardt) Du Bois was conceived on February 23, 1863 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

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Du Bois knew little of his dad. Alfred Du Bois wedded Mary Burghardt in 1867. Not long after Du Bois was conceived, his dad left, never to return. Du Bois depicted him as "a visionary - sentimental, lethargic, kind, inconsistent, he had in him the making of an artist, a traveler, or a dearest drifter, as per the life that shut round him; and that life gave him very little."

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Du Bois at four years old, dressed to adjust to the Victorian time\'s concept of how all around carried on young men ought to show up.

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Du Bois at age nineteen.

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Jubilee Hall at Fisk University is the most seasoned perpetual building for the advanced education of African Americans in the United States

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Du Bois with Fisk University personnel and understudies before Jubilee Hall, c. 1887.

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Fisk University Class of 1888.

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Du Bois at Harvard, 1890, or University of Berlin, 1892.

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Du Bois was the first African American to get a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1896.

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Du Bois at the Paris International Exposition in 1900 where he won a gold award for his display on the accomplishment of dark Americans.

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Du Bois met Nina Gomer while at Wilberforce and they were hitched in 1896. Their first kid, Burghardt, passed on as a newborn child in Atlanta from a typhoid plague.

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Du Bois at Atlanta University, 1909.

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Scene of Lynching at Clanton, Alabama, Aug. 1891

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The lynching of Lige Daniels. August 3, 1920, Center, Texas.

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Du Bois and other dark pioneers of comparative assessments sorted out what got to be known as the Niagara Movement. It was the first association to look for full political and monetary rights for Afro-Americans at a national level. By 1910, the association prompted the establishing of the NAACP.

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Du Bois (second line, second from right) in a NAACP supported show against lynching and crowd roughness against blacks.

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Du Bois accepting the NAACP\'s Spingarn Medal, Atlanta University, 1920.

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Du Bois and individuals from The Crisis staff in their New York office.

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Resolutions set up by 15 nations at the first Pan-African Congress, Paris, February 1919.

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Speakers at the Pan-African Congress held in Brussels, Belgium, in 1921. Du Bois is second from right.

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Du Bois conveyed his message to the political coliseum when he kept running for the U.S. Senate in 1951 on the American Labor Party\'s ticket.

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Du Bois, with Shirley Graham Du Bois (right) and other prosecuted individuals from the Peace Information Center, in Washington preceding their court hearing.

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Throughout the 1950s, Du Bois\' worries turned out to be progressively universal, and he voyaged and addressed on various issues including demobilization and the fate of Africa.

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Ghana\'s President Kwame Nkrumah offers a toast on Du Bois\' 95th birthday, c. February, 1963.

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One thing alone I charge you. As you live, have faith in Life! Continuously individuals will live and advancement to more noteworthy, more extensive and more full life. The main conceivable demise is to lose confidence in this truth essentially on the grounds that the immense end comes gradually, in light of the fact that time is long.  â â - - W.E.B. Du Bois in his last explanation to the world, 1963

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“How does it feel to be a problem?” W.E.B. Du Bois, 1868-1963

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W.E.B. Du Bois, Strivings of the Negro People (1897) Main Points: 1. Being an issue [i.e. being a dark individual in nineteenth c. America] is a bizarre ordeal. [T]he Negro is a kind of seventh child, conceived with a shroud, and skilled with second-locate in this American world,- - a world which yields him no reluctance, yet just gives him a chance to see himself through the disclosure of the other world. It is an impossible to miss sensation, this twofold awareness, this feeling of continually taking a gander at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in diverted hatred and compassion. (p. 88)

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2. The African American feels his duality of being both African and American. One ever feels his two-ness, — an American, a Negro; two souls, two considerations, two unreconciled strivings; two warring beliefs in one dim body, whose resolute quality alone keeps it from being torn into pieces. The historical backdrop of the American Negro is the historical backdrop of this strife, — this aching to achieve hesitant masculinity, to consolidation his twofold self into a superior and more genuine self. In this consolidating he wishes neither of the more seasoned selves to be lost. He doesn\'t wish to Africanize America, for America has an excessive amount to instruct the world and Africa; he doesn\'t wish to blanch his Negro blood in a surge of white Americanism, for he accepts — stupidly, maybe, yet intensely — that Negro blood has yet a message for the world. He basically wishes to make it feasible for a man to be both a Negro and an American without being reviled and spit upon by his colleagues, without losing the chance of self-improvement. (p. 88)

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3. Partiality and separation keep the freedman persecuted. The freedman has not yet found in flexibility his guaranteed area. Whatever of lesser great may have come in these years of progress, the shadow of a profound disillusionment rests upon the Negro people…. (p. 88) 4. Americans, including white Americans, ought to value the Negro race. Work, society, and freedom,- - all these we require, not separately, but rather together; for to-day these standards among the Negro individuals are bit by bit blending, and discovering a higher importance in the bringing together perfect of race,- - the perfect of cultivating the qualities and gifts of the Negro, not contrary to, but rather in congruity with, the more prominent goals of the American republic, all together that sometime in the future, on American soil, two world races may offer each to each those attributes which both so tragically need. (p. 88)

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W.E.B. Du Bois, The Niagara Movement , (1905) 1. We ought to meet, in spite of the presence of different associations for Negroes. 2. We must grumble about basic wrongs toward blacks. We must whine. Yes, plain, limit dissension, interminable tumult, unfailing presentation of deceptive nature and wrong—this is the old, unerring approach to freedom, and we must tail it. (p. 100) 3. In not a solitary occurrence has the equity of our requests been denied, however then come the reasons.

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despite everything they go ahead, regardless they nurture the obstinate trust, — not a trust of disgusting support, not a trust of gathering into enchanted social circles of stock-middlemen, pork-packers, and earl-seekers, however the trust of a higher blend of development and humankind, a genuine advancement, with which the chorale "Peace, positive attitude to men,“ "May make one music as some time recently, But vaster." Pages 126-127.

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One ever feels his two-ness, — an American, a Negro; two souls, two considerations, two unreconciled strivings; two warring standards in one dull body, whose stubborn quality alone keeps it from being torn into pieces. The historical backdrop of the American Negro is the historical backdrop of this strife, — this yearning to accomplish hesitant masculinity, to consolidation his twofold self into a superior and more genuine self. In this consolidating he wishes neither of the more seasoned selves to be lost. He doesn\'t wish to Africanize America, for America has an excessive amount to instruct the world and Africa; he doesn\'t wish to dye his Negro blood in a surge of white Americanism, for he accepts — absurdly, maybe, yet intensely — that Negro blood has yet a message for the world. He essentially wishes to make it feasible for a man to be both a Negro and an American without being reviled and spit upon by his colleagues, without losing the chance of self-improvement. p. 125.

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Then it unfolded upon me with a sure suddenness that I was not the same as the others; or like, mayhap, in heart and life and aching, yet close out from their reality by an immeasurable shroud. I had from that point no yearning to tear down that cloak, to crawl through; I held all past it in like manner scorn, and lived above it in an area of blue sky and awesome meandering shadows. That sky was bluest when I could beat my mates at examination-time, or beat them at a foot-race, or even beat their stringy heads. p. 124.

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To be a poor man is hard, yet to be a poor race in a place where there is dollars is the extremely base of hardships. He felt the heaviness of his lack of awareness, — not just of letters, but rather of life, of business, of the humanities; the gathered sloth and evading and ungainliness of decades and hundreds of years shackled his hands and feet. Nor was his weight all destitution and lack of awareness. The red stain of bastardy, which two centuries of deliberate lawful pollution of Negro ladies had stamped upon his race, implied the loss of antiquated African purity, as well as the genetic weight of a mass of rottenness from white whoremongers and miscreants, undermining just about the annihilation of the Negro home. An individuals in this way disabled should not to be requested that race with the world, yet rather permitted to give all its time and thought to its own part

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