WHAT IS NATURE?.


101 views
Uploaded on:
Category: Product / Service
Description
WHAT IS NATURE? What's more, WHAT IS NATURE FOR? Cites FOR THE WEEK The Garden is nature under totalitarian principle.
Transcripts
Slide 1

WHAT IS NATURE? Furthermore, WHAT IS NATURE FOR?

Slide 2

QUOTES FOR THE WEEK The Lawn is nature under totalitarian standard. An existence without work is blame. Work without craftsmanship is severity. (John Ruskin, 1819-1900, British craftsman, researcher, workmanship faultfinder, artist, earthy person, scholar, and said to be the best Victorian with the exception of Queen Victoria).

Slide 3

The Economy and Nature: The Simple Model FIRMS NATURE AS A SINK FOR WASTES FROM ECONOMIC ACTIVITY squanders NATURE AS A SOURCE OF INPUTS FOR ECONOMIC ACTIVITY $ work $ things $ HOUSHOLDS squanders

Slide 4

HOUSEHOLDS BUYING FROM FIRMS SUPPLY* SUPPLY Price p* p DEMAND q* q Goods and Services

Slide 5

HOUSEHOLDS BUYING FROM NATURE SUPPLY Price p p* DEMAND D* q q* Recreation days

Slide 6

FIRMS BUYING FROM NATURE SUPPLY Price p p* DEMAND D* q q* Quantity of timber

Slide 7

FIRMS BUYING FROM HOUSEHOLDS SUPPLY Wage p p* DEMAND FOR LABOR D* q q* Quantity of work

Slide 8

The Evolution of Nature as A Commodity to be Traded obviously people had constantly utilized nature But imperialism included nature in a web of long-separation exchange And this hastened expansionism

Slide 9

The Economy and Nature With Trade Foreign Countries Domestic Economy Nature crude materials IMPORTS FIRMS $ remote trade EXPORTS Firms NATURE AS A SINK FOR WASTES things outside trade NATURE AS A SOURCE OF INPUTS FOR ECONOMIC ACTIVITY $ Households work $ wares HOUSHOLDS $ IMPORTS $ things ecological products and administrations $

Slide 10

COLONIAL EXPANSION Brockway composes of science in the administration of expansionism British East India Company – 1600 Dutch East India Company - 1602

Slide 11

Interested in flavors, timber, and so forth. That is, the extraction and importation of colorful materials from the tropics for residential utilization The British in India

Slide 12

The Evolution of Colonialism But the British were additionally keen on the tropics as a lab for science and the country state to bolster provincial stations The introduction to India instigated an enthusiasm for tea among the British, obviously tea does not develop in Britain.

Slide 13

The Tea\'s Emergence Triangle Britain began importing tea from China, yet Britain had little to exchange that the Chinese needed to have This made an issue in the surge (seepage) of British pounds to China A country will run shy its could call its own money on the off chance that it imports a lot from somewhere else

Slide 14

Solving the Currency Problem Some path must be found to get tea from China without depleting the British Treasury of Pounds, Shillings, and Pence. The answer would be found in something that China wished to have The answer turned out, tragically, to be opium

Slide 15

So the Tea Triangle Emerged The British would develop opium in India The British would take the opium to China The opium would be exchanged (bargained) for tea that would then go to England

Slide 16

Hong Kong as a Colonial Entrepot Hong Kong turned into a British region with a specific end goal to encourage the opium exchange (and exchange different merchandise) China (at any rate Southeast and East China) was a pilgrim station. Hong Kong and Shanghai were British Macau was Portuguese

Slide 17

The Opium Wars of 1839-1842 By 1830 the British had turned into the universes biggest medication traffickers, importing opium to China in return for tea and different merchandise. This exchange was fixated on the inland city of Canton (now Guangzhou).

Slide 18

The Opium Wars By 1836 China had criminalized the opium exchange yet the British renumerated Cantonese merchants and kept the exchange energetic Opium sanctums and enslavement spread See: http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/CHING/OPIUM.HTM

Slide 19

The Brockway Article Relates comparative stories for: Cinchona Rubber Sisal

Slide 20

The Dutch East India Company In 1642 The Dutch built up a station at Cape Town The intention was to procurement the boats with meat, citrus, and so on. The Dutch were occupied with flavors (the “Spice Islands”).

Slide 21

Outpost at Cape Town Fueled European Occupation of Southern Africa Huguenot’s journey for religious flexibility Dutch foreigners looking for area and opportunity Discovery of gold and precious stones The ascent of politically-sanctioned racial segregation

Slide 22

Nature and Social Policy The revelation of gold and jewels in South Africa is best comprehended as the antecedents to politically-sanctioned racial segregation The vast supply of low-wage work willing to work in the mines prompted far reaching unemployment in the 1950s and energized the ascent of a “white supremacist” government that kept going until 1994. Nelson Mandela burned through 27 of those years in jail

Slide 23

And so we see that nature and imperialism created a specific “economy” in the greater part of Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. In reality the quantity of poor creating nations that have NEVER been colonized by Britain, Germany, France, Belgium and the U.S. is little undoubtedly. This history is imperative to our own particular experience here in the U.S. We were, all things considered, a province of pioneers - pretty much as South Africa seemed to be.

Slide 24

America as the “Garden” Early European workers considered America to be a garden—verdant, untainted, lavish, beneficial and holding up to be both vanquished and also worshipped. It was “empty” and ready and waiting. See The Machine in the Garden by Leo Marx Recall Locke’s thought that nature was to be subjected to human triumph. That is the thing that nature is FOR—the reason for nature

Slide 25

The Evolved and Created Purpose of Nature in America The motivation behind nature was to deliver sustenance and fiber Timber Minerals Agriculture Water for transport and vitality generation

Slide 26

Environmental Awareness (Earth Day) in the 1970s was worried with working out another Purpose of Nature This implied testing acknowledged mentalities and convictions and practices. It implied working out motivations to respect nature in different terms.

Slide 27

And So Environmental Literature Environmental writing is giving us different motivations to see nature. It is giving us implying that we didn\'t see some time recently. By “meaning” I have at the top of the priority list approaches to discuss and to consider nature that was absent some time recently.

Slide 28

Recall our prior talk of convictions, principles and traditions, and practices? It is from here that we can comprehend a significant change in the reasons of nature (that is, what is nature for ?).

Slide 29

BELIEFS, RULES & BEHAVIOR RULES BELIEFS Rules are the basic parameters of a society—these are both legitimate and social (or standard “habits of mind”). Convictions are the musings and states of mind that educate and shape both standards and conduct. Conduct is the real decisions that individuals make—what they do.

Slide 30

The Purposes of Nature The early vision was that nature was for the procurement of crude materials for our sustenance and material advancement. Presently there is an advancing sense that nature is for something less materialistic. Maybe nature is not simply to extricate from, and to get our squanders? Maybe nature is to be “enjoyed” (“used”) in a manner that does not take FROM nature, but rather se

Recommended
View more...