Word Building Rules .


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Word Building Rules. Achievement depends on:Learning word partsLearning guidelines for consolidating word parts. Word Root. Essential establishment of a wordComponent parts are added to change meaningExample word: cardiologistcardi (word root) = heartWords with cardi will dependably allude to the heart. Consolidating Form.
Transcripts
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Section 1 Word Building Rules

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Word Building Rules Success relies on upon: Learning word parts Learning rules for consolidating word parts

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Word Root Basic establishment of a word Component parts are added to change meaning Example word: cardi ologist cardi (word root) = heart Words with cardi will dependably allude to the heart

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Combining Form Word root + vowel = consolidating structure Vowel is known as a joining vowel Usually an o – once in a while an i Combining vowels join word parts properly

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Combining Vowels: Rule When utilizing more than single word root – as in compound word Combining vowel is expected to isolate the distinctive word roots Usually done regardless of whether second or third word root starts with a vowel

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Combining Vowels: Rule Example word: myoelectric Breakdown of word: my/o/electr/ic Root = my Combining vowel = o Root = electr Suffix = ic Note: root + vowel = consolidating structure my + o = my/o

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Combining Vowels: Rule A word can\'t end in a joining structure Drop the joining vowel Add a postfix Makes the word a thing or a modifier

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Combining Vowels: Rule Example word: megalocardia Breakdown of word: megal/o/card/ia Root = megal Combining vowel = o Root = card Suffix = ia Note: Word can\'t be megal/o/card/o Must drop consolidating vowel o Must include finishing

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Suffix Attaches to the finish of the word root Makes a word a thing or a descriptive word Meaning of addition continues as before Suffix changes significance of root to which it is appended

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Suffix: Rule If postfix starts with a vowel (a,e,i,o,u,y) Root will connect specifically to it If postfix starts with a consonant Root will require a consolidating vowel before appending to the addition

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Suffix: Rule Example word: cardiogram Breakdown of word: cardi/o/gram Root = cardi Combining vowel = o Suffix = gram Note: Suffix starts with a consonant Combining vowel is required

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Suffix: Rule Example word: cardialgia Breakdown of word: cardi/algia Root = cardi Suffix = algia Note: Suffix starts with a vowel Combining vowel is not required

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Prefix Attaches to the start of a word Meaning of prefix dependably continues as before Prefix changes importance of root to which it is connected Not all words have prefixes

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Prefix: Rule Example word: endocardium Breakdown of word: endo/cardi/um Prefix = endo Root = cardi Suffix = um Prefix joins straightforwardly to start of word Note: Combining vowel is not required

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Word Structure Review Prefix is put at start of word Suffix is set at end of word root Combining structures are utilized when word has more than single word root = compound word

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Word Structure Review Compound words are normally made in the accompanying request: Combining structure + word root + postfix Example: Leuk + o + cyt + osis (Combining structure) + word root + postfix

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Word Structure Review Defining a medicinal term: Define addition first Read from appropriate to left and characterize each word component Example: carditis Suffix = itis = aggravation Word root = card = heart Definition = irritation of the heart

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Word Structure Review Medical words with prefixes Define postfix in the first place, prefix second, word roots last

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Word Structure Example: intracardiac Suffix = air conditioning = relating to Prefix = intra = inside Word root = cardi = heart Definition = relating to inside the heart

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Word Structure Review When therapeutic words distinguish body frameworks or parts Define addition to start with, body organs all together they are contemplated in body framework

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Word Structure Example: cardiopulmonary Suffix = ary = relating to Body organ = cardi = heart Body organ = pulmon = lungs Definition = relating to the heart and the lungs

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Pronunciation Guidelines Pronunciation of restorative word May be precisely similar to it sounds Example: febrile = "f" sound, starts with "f" May start with a letter, or letters that delivers the same phonetic sound Example: physiology = "f" sound, starts with "ph"

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Pronunciation Guidelines If it sounds like "f" Look for "f" = febrile Look for "ph" = physiology If it sounds like "j" Look for "j" = jejunum Look for "ge" = beginning Look for "gi" = gingivitis Look for "gy" = gyrus

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Pronunciation Guidelines If it sounds like "k" Look for "k" = kyphosis Look for "c" = cornea Look for "ch" = chorion Look for "qu" = quadruplet If it sounds like "n" Look for "n" = neonatal Look for "pn" = pneumonia Look for "kn" = knee

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Pronunciation Guidelines If it sounds like "s" Look for "s" = sarcoma Look for "c" = cervix Look for "ps" = brain science If it sounds like "sk" Look for "sk" = skeleton Look for "sc" = sclera Look for "sch" = schizophrenia

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Pronunciation Guidelines If it sounds like "z" Look for "z" = zygomatic Look for "x" = xanthoma

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Additional Pronunciation Rules Words that start with "c" If took after by \'e\', \'i\', or "y" Pronounced as delicate "c" Has "j" sound Examples "ce" = cervix "ci" = circumduction "cy" = sore

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Additional Pronunciation Rules Words that start with "c" If took after by \'an\', \'o\', \'u\', or consonant Pronounced as hard "c" Has a "k" sound Examples "ca" = growth "co" = collagen "cu" = fingernail skin "ch" = cheiloplasty

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Additional Pronunciation Rules Word establishes that end in "g" If took after by "e" or "i" Pronounced as delicate "g" Sounds like "j" Examples Laryn g/e ctomy Pharyn g/i tis

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Additional Pronunciation Rules Word establishes that end in "g" If took after by \'an\', \'o\', or consonant Pronounced as hard "g" Has "guh" sound Examples Laryn g/a lgia Menin g/o cele Gl ossal

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Possessive Forms Some maladies are named after people Pronounced and written in possessive structures Eponym ( EP - gracious nim) Name for a sickness, organ, method, or body work Derived from the name of a man

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