Corporate and School Associations: Best Practices and Managing Standards October 4, 2001 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Corporate and School Associations: Best Practices and Managing Standards October 4, 2001 PowerPoint Presentation
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Corporate and School Associations: Best Practices and Managing Standards October 4, 2001

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  1. Corporate & School Partnerships: Best Practices & Guiding Principles October 4, 2001

  2. Research Context & Role • Schools continue to need resources and funding • Increased number of public-private relationships in schools • Increased attention to sales and marketing of products in schools • Increased media focus has caused reexamination of value of public-private relationships • Danger of limiting relationships to appease critics • Educators support public-private relationships • Recognized need for guidelines to translate relationships into appropriate and effective corporate and school partnerships

  3. Research Objectives • Conduct a study of school administrators to determine: • how often school business partnerships occur • what are the objectives of these partnerships • how these partnerships function • level of satisfaction with partnership arrangements • Conduct a study of business executives to gather: • detailed and comprehensive examples of partnerships between corporations and education • definition of success factors • best-in-class exemplars • Use the data to develop a set of Guiding Principles to lead corporations in building appropriate and effective public-private partnerships in education

  4. Research Methodology • Two phases of research for project (September 2001): • School administrator quantitative survey of 260 School Administrators • 20 minute telephone interview • Sample -- national list of school principals • School had to have Business or Corporate Foundation partnership • Administrator who managed the partnership included Principals, Assistant Principals or Business Coordinator • Qualitative survey of 47 School Board members and Superintendents • 20 minute telephone interview • Sample - national list of board members, and superintendents • Business executive qualitative survey with 50 large, medium and small businesses • Respondents recruited by broadcast fax • 1 hour telephone interview • Sample -- Partners in Education database • Knowledgeable about business involvement

  5. Council Work Group The Best Practices Research has been guided by counsel from members of the Best Practices Sub-Committee. Dr. Bruno V. Manno The Annie E. Casey Foundation Dr. Patricia E. Newby Superintendent, Grand Rapids Public Schools Ms. Delia Pompa Executive Director, National Association for Bilingual Education Dr. Gerald N. Tirozzi Executive Director, National Association of Secondary School Principals

  6. The Best Practices Research Team To ensure the objectivity of the findings, a third party was contracted to consult and manage the Best Practices research. The National Association of Partners in Education led the research project using two teams of researchers. National Association of Partners in Education Daniel W. Merenda, President and CEO Ranjit Sidhu, Executive Vice President and COO Consulting Research and Information Services E. Judy Barokas, Ph.D., President Kane, Parsons and Associates, Inc. Herman W. Kane, President R. Wayne Parsons, Executive Vice President

  7. An Overview of Growth & Change Partnerships have increased in number, amount of volunteer hours and value to school. Source: Partnerships 2000: A Decade of Growth and Change

  8. An Overview of Growth & Change Growth of partnerships is being fueled by private business. 74% 76% 76% 63% 61% 59% 42% 41% 38% 34% 29% 23% ParentOrganizations Non Profits Associations SmallBusiness MediumCorporations LargeCorporations Source: Partnerships 2000: A Decade of Growth and Change

  9. Approach to Developing Guiding Principles Research Steps: Data Collection, Analysis, and Synthesis Research Synthesis & Analysis Guiding Themes Guiding Principles School Administrators Business Executives Partners in Education Industry Analysts Council Subcommittee The Council Detailed methodology found in Appendix

  10. Mutual benefits define partnerships. Philanthropic Process Business School Commerce Process Business School Partnership Process Business School

  11. Key Research Findings • School Administrators

  12. General Partnership Overview The majority of school administrator partnerships are developed with business. 95% 43% 29% 22% 22% Business CorporateFoundations OtherNon-Profits PrivateFoundations GovernmentOrganizations Base: 261 School Administrators Q. Does your school have any kind of partnership or joint activity with?

  13. General Partnership Overview Importance Of Partnerships To Schools(Percent Extremely/Very Important) The most important areas supported with partnerships focus on student development and advancement. Areas of less importance address the expansion of bricks and mortar. 72% 60% 49% 44% 28% Base: 261 School Administrators Q. How important are partnerships to your ability to provide the following programs?

  14. General Partnership Overview Food, beverage, and restaurant companies are mentioned most often in terms of important partnerships. Most Important Partnership To The School 33% 17% 19% 11% 8% 7% 5% Food Bev Misc. Profit Don’tKnow Non Profit Retail Mftr. Financial Base: 261 School Administrators Q. What company is involved with the most important partnership you rely on to meet your objectives?

  15. Specific Partnership Evaluation School administrators are very pleased with the performance of their most important business partner. Degree Of Satisfaction With The Selected Partnership Somewhat/Very Dissatisfied 3% Somewhat Satisfied10% ExtremelySatisfied38% VerySatisfied49% Base: 261 School Administrators Q. Overall, how satisfied are you with the ability of this partnership in meetings its goal?

  16. Characteristics of Effective Partnerships Satisfaction with a partnership is highly correlated to these characteristics: 1. Ability to resolve problems arising from partnership 2. Clear communication of roles and responsibilities 3. Well planned program 4. Value of program to school or students 5. Follow-through training for teachers and staff 6. Support materials for teachers and staff 7. Quality of services and products Characteristics listed by order of strength of correlation

  17. Specific Partnership Evaluation Likelihood Of Continuing The PartnershipBeyond The 2001-2002 School Year Almost 100% of the school administrators expect to continue the partnership next school year. Not Likely4% Very Likely 30% Definitely 67% Base: 261 School Administrators Q. How likely are you to continue this partnership beyond the 2001-2002 school year?

  18. Commitment to the Partnership Of the administrators definitely continuing the selected partnership, the defining characteristics of commitment are: • Goals of the partnership and school are perfectly aligned • Goal of the partnership is to advance student education • Formal management system is in place • School conducts formal evaluations of the partnership • Teachers are favorably oriented towards the partnership • Written policy supports business partnerships in the school There is no rank order for Commitment Characteristics. Characteristics are profiled from questions where committed Administrator answers are distinctly different from the less committed Administrators.

  19. Specific Partnership Evaluation Attitudes Of Various Constituencies Towards The Partnership With the exception of the media, school administrators believe the school and community perceive partnerships to be favorable. Base: 261 School Administrators Q. How would you describe the attitudes toward the partnership among the following constituents?

  20. Perceptions & Attitudes Perceived Benefits Of The Partnership For The Business Partner School administrators clearly recognize benefits of school partnerships for their business partners ranging from “Goodwill” to “Generating Revenue”. Goodwill of community and parents Building brand loyalty Receiving positive media coverage Advancing role as community leader Direct marketing to students Generating revenue Base: 261 School Administrators Q. Do you feel the partnership benefits the business partner by? (Percent responding YES)

  21. Perceptions & Attitudes Appropriateness Of School Providing PublicRecognition Of A Business Partner School administrators feel it is appropriate to publicly recognize business partnerships. 35% Extremely appropriate 41% Very appropriate 17% Somewhat appropriate 3% Not very or not at all appropriate Not sure 4% Base: 261 School Administrators Q. How appropriate is it for the school to provide public recognition of the efforts provided by the business partner?

  22. General Partnership Overview Companies in the Food, Beverage and Restaurant industry are most frequently cited as Best Class Partners. Within that category, Coca-Cola and Pepsi are the two companies most often mentioned by name. Best Class Partnerships Coca-Cola 11% Pepsi 10% McDonald’s 5% Gen. Mills 1% Kroger 1% Other 6% 20% 14% 13% 13% 6% Food Beverage Restaurant Non Profit Misc. Profit Retail Financial Don’tKnow Base: 261 School Administrators Q. Can you give me the name of a company you feel is doing an especially good job with school partnerships?

  23. Key Research Findings • Business Executives

  24. Participating Companies Business interviews included executives from small, medium and large companies.

  25. FINANCIAL Increased revenue Customer loyalty HUMAN CAPITAL Employee morale through work on altruistic program Employee recruitment & retention Economic health of community COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Better schools increase value of community Well educated students strengthen the work force Community education and philanthropy HUMAN CAPITAL Better preparation for world of work Successful job placements COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Increased funds for schools Higher test scores Increased student achievement Benefits to Business and Schools Perceived benefits are threefold: Financial, Human Capital Investment and Community Development. Business School Source: 50 Business Executive Interviews

  26. Measures of Success Business measures success by the level of performance of students and the company. • Improved student performance • Increased publicity for business • Larger recruitment pools • Reduced turnover • Higher profitability Source: 50 Business Executive Interviews

  27. Business Executive Best Practices Best Practice principles identified by business executives stress the importance of program planning, process management, and communication. • Recognize partnerships are both a process & product • Identify services and available resources • Set realistic goals • Emphasize clear communications • Create on-going monitoring and evaluation • Determine mutual needs • Clarify partnership mission • Secure top management support and commitment • Clearly define expectations, roles, and responsibilities Source: 50 Business Executive Interviews

  28. Guiding Themes Characteristics of Effective Partnerships Guiding Themes GuidingPrinciples Characteristics of Committed Partnerships Business Best Practices

  29. Mutual benefits define partnerships. Philanthropic Process Business School Commerce Process Business School Partnership Process Business School

  30. Values & Philosophies The Council Research changes the established Partnership paradigm.

  31. Guiding Principles for Corporate and School Partnerships • Themes defining effective partnerships fall into three areas: • Values • Structure • Performance/Results

  32. Guiding Principles for Corporate and School Partnerships Values Based Themes • Partnership reflects and supports the core values of both school and business. • Partnership is based on mutually defined and beneficial goals and objectives. • Partnership concept is integrated into the school and business cultures.

  33. Values Based Theme # 1 Partnership reflects and supports the core values of both school and business. • Partnerships are “child-centered,” and enhance the academic, social, and physical well-being of students. • Partnerships respect the culture and goals of business and education partners. • Partnerships support the social values and goals of the local community.

  34. Values Based Theme # 2 Partnership is based on mutually defined and beneficial goals and objectives. • The needs of all partners are on the table from the beginning. • School and business goals are collaborative. • Success is defined from the perspective of all stakeholders. • Goals and objectives include opportunities for recognition of both partners. • Partnerships are aligned with education goals of individual schools and/or districts.

  35. Values Based Theme # 3 Partnership concept is integrated into the school and business cultures. • Partners communicate frequently to understand each other’s cultures. • Students, teachers, and business employees interact at school and business sites.

  36. Guiding Principles for Corporate and School Partnerships Structure Based Themes • Partnership is guided by a written policy(ies) at the school/district level. • Partnership has a defined management process and structure. • Partnership holds each partner accountable for specific outcomes.

  37. Structure Based Theme # 1 Partnership is guided by a written policy(ies) at the school or district level. • Written policies strengthen and support partnership by outlining engagement in commitment to core values and ongoing administration.

  38. Structure Based Theme # 2 Partnership has a defined management process and structure. • School has a point person to manage partnerships to ensure quality and alignment. • Management structure includes written procedures for partnerships, roles and responsibilities, accountability measures, and guidelines for teachers. • Partnership training/mentoring is provided to all key partners.

  39. Structure Based Theme # 3 Partnership holds each partner accountable for specific outcomes. • Partnerships are evaluated on a regular basis. • There is communication of intended and actual outcomes with all partners. • Partnerships are guided by collaborative agreement on outcomes, benchmarks and progress points.

  40. Guiding Principles for Corporate and School Partnerships Performance Based Themes • Partnership is measured by clear definitions of success for both school and business. • Partnership has articulated and demonstrated support at the highest level within business and schools. • Partnership is explicitly supported by teachers, employees and other constituents.

  41. Performance Based Theme # 1 Partnership is measured by clear definitions of success for both school and business. • Establish success measures at the outset of the partnership. • Outcomes are measurable and time bound.

  42. Performance Based Theme # 2 Partnership has articulated and demonstrated support at the highest level within business and schools. • Superintendent, principal, school boards, CEO’s and managers articulate and demonstrate support for partnership internally and externally.

  43. Performance Based Theme # 3 Partnership is explicitly supported by teachers, employees and other constituents. • Teachers and employees understand and support partnership. • Community has a positive image of the partnership.

  44. Key Next Steps These qualitative data were used to inform the following activities: • Revision of the Guiding Principles • Communication Plan Development • Implementation Tool Development