The antagonistic effect of innovation development on system/venture achievement - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

the adverse impact of technology maturity on program project success and how to mitigate it l.
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The antagonistic effect of innovation development on system/venture achievement

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  1. Presented By James W. Bilbro The adverse impact of technology maturity on program/project success – and how to mitigate it Technology Readiness and Development SeminarApril 28, 2005

  2. The goal of this presentation is: to give insight into the impact of technology maturity on program/project success to provide a set of tools that will yield information of vital importance to the successful development and infusion of technology. Goal

  3. “1.a. The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives*. b. The entire body of methods and materials used to achieve such objectives.” - The American Heritage Dictionary What is Technology? *or in NASA’s case space

  4. What is Technology? (continued) • Technology development lies within the context of part a. and as such is the subject of the remainder of this presentation. • Engineering makes use of technology within the context of part b. In this context, technology may be “old (passe),” “off-the-shelf (commercially available),” or new (at various levels of maturity {TRLs})

  5. What is a Technology Readiness Level (TRL)? • At its most basic, the TRL is a description of the maturity of a given technology defined by what has been done, under what conditions at a given point in time. • However, the TRL is just one part of the equation – it establishes the baseline. • The more fundamental question is what is required (in terms of cost, schedule and risk to move the technology from where it is to where it needs to be. • In addition, there is an organizational aspect of technology assessment that speaks to the capability of a given organization to reproduce a technology irrespective of its maturity level.

  6. What is an Advancement Degree of Difficulty (AD2)? • AD2is a method of dealing with the other aspects beyond TRL, it is the description of what is required to move a technology from one TRL to another. • It also takes into account: • the organizational aspects (ability of an organization to reproduce existing technology) • manufacturability (MRL) • Integration (IRL) • Tools & facilities (CRL)

  7. 1. Culture: What is Different about Managing Technology? There really are four very distinct cultural differences among the community involved in any typical program. • Scientists, who know all there is to know about science and furthermore think they know everything about engineering and technology. • Engineers, who know all there is to know about engineering, think they know everything about technology and don’t give a ****** about science.

  8. What is Different about Managing Technology? • Technologists, who really do know all there is to know about technology, know what they need to know about science and could do engineering if they wanted to. • Everyone else (including Program Managers) • Now the main thing in common with the first 3 groups is that they all agree that the 4th group doesn’t know anything about anything – especially Program Managers.

  9. 2. Technology vs. Flight Hardware Development: What is Different about Managing Technology? These cultures interact in a much different way in a technology program than they do in flight hardware development. In flight hardware development: • Program managers are in charge. • Scientists are the customers. • Engineers do the work. • Technologists are off in their laboratory somewhere.

  10. In technology development: What is Different about Managing Technology? • Technologists are really in charge. • Scientists are involved in pointing out how the technologist needs to go back to basic principles. • Engineers are trying to figure out what the requirements are. • Program managers are pulling their hair out trying to get someone to give them a schedule.

  11. In all seriousness, in a flight hardware development, the process is nominally as follows: What is Different about Managing Technology? • Receive requirements • Develop a WBS • Lay out the schedule • Estimate the costs • Receive funding • Commence work • Deliver the product

  12. The underlying philosophy is built around the fact that requirements are achievable otherwise a different set of requirements would have been given. There will be “engineering problems” encountered in development that must be solved, but everything is “doable.” This mind set therefore results in linear planning and assigns responsibility for any delays, cost overruns, etc. as being obviously due to inadequate definition (or escalation) of requirements. What is Different about Managing Technology? In flight hardware development:

  13. In technology development: What is Different about Managing Technology? • Requirements are in fact goals that may or may not be met. • Progress is not linear • Parallel paths must be pursued • Decision points must be established based on measurable parameters • Schedules are therefore set on the basis of “predicted” times to resolve problems which are at best only partially known. • Costs (as well as schedules) are in the end dictated by difficulties encountered in overcoming problems that were unknown at the beginning of the program.

  14. In technology development: What is Different about Managing Technology? The underlying philosophy is based upon MAXIMIZING THE PROBABILITY OF SUCCESS! Risk of failure increases as TRL decreases. Therefore, the likelihood of being able to do develop and incorporate technology successfully is highly dependent upon the required technology being at a readiness level commensurate with the available time and money.

  15. In a recent article in the Sloan Management review, uncertainty (risk) was broken down into 4 categories: Variation Foreseen uncertainty Unforeseen uncertainty (unknown-unknowns) Chaos Program/project Risk These four categories of uncertainty require different approaches from the management team if they are to be successfully resolved.

  16. Characterizing the Uncertainty in Projects Type of Uncertainty Variation • Cost, time and performance levels vary randomly, but in a predictable range. • A linear flow of coordinated tasks (circles below) represents the critical path toward project completion. • Variation in task times will cause the path to shift. • Anticipating shifts and building in buffers (triangles) helps the team to complete project within a predictable range.

  17. Outcome Decision Node X1 Foreseen Certainty Chance Node X2 Go X3 X4 No-go Characterizing the Uncertainty in Projects Type of Uncertainty • A few known factors will influence the project, but in predictable ways. • Major project risks, or “chance nodes” (circles), can be identified. • Contingent actions can be planned (squares), depending upon actual events and desired outcomes (Xs).

  18. X1 X2 Go X3 X4 Unforeseen Chance node X5 X6 Characterizing the Uncertainty in Projects Type of Uncertainty Unforeseen Uncertainty • One or more major influence factors cannot be predicted. • The project team can still formulate a decision tree that appropriately represents the major risks and contingent actions • It must recognize an unforeseen chance node when it occurs and develop new contingency plans midway through the project.

  19. ? ? Characterizing the Uncertainty in Projects Type of Uncertainty Chaos • Unforeseen events completely invalidate the project’s target, planning and approach. • The project team must continually redefine the project’s basic premises and create new decision trees based on incremental learning. • Medium- and long-term contingencies are not plannable.

  20. Uncertainty Profile • Creating an uncertainty profile of a program or project can provide valuable information relative to what is required to manage a program successfully. • While there are many different elements that contribute to program/project uncertainty, a good case can be made for lack of technology maturity being the dominant component in the latter two categories: • Unforeseen Uncertainty • Chaos.

  21. Uncertainty Profile • Uncertainty profiles can be created based on Technology Readiness Levels in combination with their associated Advancement Degree of Difficulty. • Different Flight Programs will have different uncertainty profiles depending upon the amount and maturity of the technologies that must be infused for the program to be successful and the difficulty required in advancing the technologies to the point where they can be successfully infused.

  22. TRL-1/AD2 TRL-3/AD2 TRL-6/AD2 TRL-9/AD2 Chaos Unforeseen Uncertainty Foreseen Uncertainty Variation Uncertainty Profile Beware

  23. What is involved in Technology Assessment? • It is a continuous, iterative process over the life of the program. • It is a critical process that must begin at the earliest stage of a program. • It is a two step process: • The accurate determination of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). • The accurate determination of the Advancement Degree of Difficulty (AD2) i.e., the difficulty associated with advancing a technology from one TRL to the next.

  24. Architecture Studies And the Technology Assessment Process Architecture Studies System Design Concepts Requirements TRL/AD2 Assessment Technology Development

  25. What is a Technology Readiness Level Assessment? • It is the assessment of the state-of-the art of a given technology relative to the categories described by the Technology Readiness Levels. • For a system, subsystem or element, the TRL for the whole is determined by the lowest TRL of its components. • At its most basic level, the TRL is a description of what has been done at a given point in time. NB: Test results are critical to determining TRLs. The tests must be done in the proper environment and the unit tested must be of an appropriate scale and fidelity.

  26. TRL 9 TRL 8 TRL 7 TRL 6 TRL 5 TRL 4 TRL 3 TRL 2 TRL 1 Actual system “flight proven” through successful mission operations Actual system completed and “flight qualified” through test and demonstration (Ground or Flight) System prototype demonstration in a space environment System/subsystem model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment (Ground or Space) Component and/or breadboard validation in relevant environment Component and/or breadboard validation in laboratory environment Analytical and experimental critical function and/or characteristic proof-of-concept Technology concept and/or application formulated Basic principles observed and reported

  27. Proto-type Unit: The proto-type unit demonstrates form, fit and function. It is to every possible extent identical to flight hardware, and is built to test the manufacturing and testing processes and is intended to be tested to flight qualification levels. the only difference from the flight unit is that it is realized that elements of the proto-type unit will in all probability be changed as a result of experiences encountered in the development and testing of the Proto-type unit. Relevant Environment:Not all systems, subsystems and/or components need to be operated in a full space/launch environment in order to satisfactorily address performance margin requirements. Consequently, the specific environment is tailored to the performance requirements being addressed. Definitions

  28. Flight Proto-flight Qual Unit Mass Model Prototype AXAF VETA 100% X-33 Form Fit Brassboard AXAF TMA 100% Wind Tunnel Model Breadboard Function 100% Form, Fit & Function

  29. TRL Assessment YES Has an identical unit been successfully operated in space or launch in an identical configuration? TRL 9 NO YES Has an identical unit been demonstrated in space or launch but in a different configuration and/or system? TRL 8 NO YES Has an identical unit been flight qualified, but not yet flown in space or launched? TRL 8 NO

  30. TRL Assessment NO Has a prototype unit (or one similar enough to be considered a prototype) been demonstrated in space or launch? YES TRL 7 NO Has a prototype unit (or one similar enough to be considered a prototype) been demonstrated in a relevant environment e.g. thermal vac, acoustic, dynamic loads, etc.? YES TRL 6 NO Beware - Land of the Unknown (There be monsters here)

  31. TRL Assessment • Repeat the process for all subsystems, identifying the TRLs corresponding to each subsystem. • Repeat the process for all elements of each subsystem, identifying the TRL corresponding to each element within a subsystem. • The lowest TRL of the lowest element is the TRL of the system.

  32. TRL Assessment Matrix TRL Assessment Demonstration Units Environment Unit Description Red = Below TRL 3 Yellow = TRL 3, 4 & 5 Green = TRL 6 and above White = Unknown X Exists Space/Launch Operation Laboratory Environment Relevant Environment Developmental Model Space Environment Appropriate Scale Flight Qualified Overall TRL Breadboard Brassboard Prototype Function Concept Form Fit 1.0 System 1.1 Subsystem X 1.1.1 Mechanical Components 1.1.2 Mechanical Systems X X X X X 1.1.3 Electrical Components 1.1.4 Electrical Systems

  33. AD2 Assessment Process Once the key technologies are identified and their respective TRLs assigned, it is necessary to determine what is required to advance them to the level necessary for the success of the program. This assessment is one of the most challenging aspects of technology development. – not all technologies are the same. • It requires the art of “prediction,” which, if it is to be accurate must rely on: • Expert personnel • Detailed examination of required activity. • Review by independent advisory panel

  34. AD2 Assessment Having acquired the appropriate expertise, determination of the AD2 is primarily a matter of: • Addressing the appropriate questions regarding the development process • Identifying the quantitative steps in the developments that must be undertaken (breadboards, developmental models, prototypes, etc.) • Identifying what tests must be undertaken to certify the advancement • Making informed assessments of the degree of difficulty in pursuing the development/testing/evaluation.

  35. AD2 Assessment – detailed examination of required activity Design/Analysis: Do you have the necessary tools for design and analysis at the level of accuracy required? If not what needs to be done, how long will it take and how difficult will it be to accomplish it? • Data bases • Design methods • Analytical tools • Models

  36. AD2 Assessment -- detailed examination of required activity Manufacturing: Do you have the necessary tools/processes for manufacturing at the level of accuracy required? If not what needs to be done, how long will it take and how difficult will it be to accomplish it? • Materials • Tooling • Metrology Process development • Developmental units required

  37. AD2 Assessment – detailed examination of required activity Test & Evaluation: Do you have the necessary equipment/processes/facilities for test and evaluation at the level of accuracy required? If not what needs to be done, how long will it take and how difficult will it be to accomplish it? • Environmental Facilities • Test Hardware • Analysis Software • Special requirements • Test units needed (breadboards, prototypes etc.)

  38. AD2 Assessment – detailed examination of required activity Operability: Throughout the development of the design, manufacturing and testing processes, operability must be taken into account. • Ease of manufacture • Operability • Reproducibility • Reliability • Verifiability • Testability • Life cycle costs

  39. AD2 Assessment Matrix

  40. Technology Roadmaps The information contained in the TRL matrix and the AD2 matrix provides the basis for the Technology Roadmaps. • Critical Technologies • Related Technologies • Breadboards and Developmental Models required • Tests Required • Candidates for alternative path development

  41. Cost and Schedule • The AD2 assessment provides considerable detail for an accurate determination of program cost and schedule. • The identification of data bases, tools, processes, facilities tests, scale model development and integration issues in particular will assist in developing realistic cost plans. • The identification of requirements for engineering model development and subsequent tests will be of particular benefit in outlining realistic schedules.

  42. Implementation Plans • Implementation plans are essentially Technology Roadmaps that have been refined based on available $ and Time. • The Implementation plan is developed using: • The approved Cost Plan • The Baseline Program Schedule • The Technology Roadmap

  43. Summary Successful development and incorporation of technology into programs is a hard job! It requires: • Continuous effort • Skilled people • Long term commitment • Strategic plans, roadmaps, implementation plans • And Flexibility

  44. Notes • De Meyer, Arnould, Loch, Christoph H., and Pich Michael T., “Managing Project Uncertainty: From Variation to Chaos,” MIT Sloan Management Review, pp. 60-67, Winter 2002. • Mankins,John C. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY(R&D3) Advanced Projects Office / Office of Space Flight, NASA Headquarters,March 10, 1998, Revised July 1, 2000,Reformatted November 21, 2004