Future Game: Is sues in the intervention of games programming by means of new media - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Future Game: Is sues in the intervention of games programming by means of new media PowerPoint Presentation
Future Game: Is sues in the intervention of games programming by means of new media

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Future Game: Is sues in the intervention of games programming by means of new media

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  1. Future Sport: Issues in the mediation of sports programming via new media Joanne Jacobs National Centre for Australian Studies

  2. Scope of the paper • Influence of Pay TV on FTA • History of Pay • Introduction of DTV • Streaming Media • Next generation devices • Media v Teams v Internet • Live v On-Demand

  3. Influence of Pay TV on FTA • No loss of existing audience share to FTAs (only loss of potential) • Globally the audience figures for FTA sports programming is reducing as market choices become more plentiful • Pay TV is now old technology. While rights are still being negotiated, new vehicles for content transmission are emerging.

  4. History of Pay TV in Australia • Anti-siphoning laws • Adoption of Pay TV has been strong • By late 2000, close to 20% of Australian population have the capacity to connect to Pay services, and 50% of homes with Pay connected actually watch. (SOURCE: A C Nielsen) • Pay TV dedicated sports programming initiatives • Optus’ AFL Channel • FOX Sports

  5. Pay TV Statistics • In 2000, there were approximately 1.3 million subscribers to Pay TV • AUSTAR: 430,000 • FOXTEL: 670,000 • OPTUS: 220,000(SOURCE: Paul Budde Communications) • People with PAY TV are more likely to watch pay services than FTA • 70-75% of viewing time spent on Pay TV • 43% of Pay viewers spend 15 hours a week watching Pay TV(SOURCES: FOXTEL, AUSTAR & XYZ Research)

  6. Pay TV Information • While adoption has seemed slow, the actual penetration of Pay has been relatively strong • Penetration in Sydney and Melbourne is approximately 17%. Paul Budde notes that “more and better initiatives will be needed to reach the 20-25% penetration level”. • Sport represents one of three key attractors to Pay TV

  7. Introduction of Digital TV • No participation from Pay TV players • No multichannelling for the FTAs (so no dedicated sports channels) • Limited enhanced programming (Eg: end of a cricket match whilst news services are also being broadcast) • Rise and fall of datacasting

  8. Streaming media • Examples of streaming sports • Cricket audio on ABC site (live) • AFL audio (delayed, on demand) • AFL video (delayed, on demand) • Issues that have emerged • Do broadcasters have rights to netcast? • Who has rights to streaming content after the event? • Streaming growth (ADSL and cable penetration)

  9. Next generation devices • Sports results delivered to a mobile device • Requires partnerships between mobile phone carriers and sports broadcasters • Internet connectivity for Palm Pilot™ or other personal organiser device • Digital television technologies • Datacasting / iTV (if it is reinstated) • Personal Video Recorders in advanced receivers (which remove advertisements)

  10. Media v Teams v Internet • Media recognise the threat of market fragmentation due to competition provided by new vehicles for content delivery • Teams/Organisations feel entitled to profit consolidation from website-driven, on-demand streaming content • Syndicators (broadcasters) do not often have web rights • Licences for international distribution need to be established for online content

  11. Live v. On-Demand • Pay TV and FTA have live coverage advantages. They also have the advantage of infotainment value-addition (FAQ sheets, merchandising, and information services) • Datacasting, PVRs and Internet have on-demand advantage after the event • Rights for new technologies need not be bundled together but need to be cognizant of live v. on-demand privileges

  12. Conclusions • Influence of Pay TV on FTA has been minimal in the broadcast of sport, due to anti-siphoning laws and due to slow adoption of (loss-making) dedicated services • As more vehicles for transmission of content emerge, effects of next generation devices are likely to be more profound on both FTA and Pay services

  13. Conclusions • Rights for mediation of sports events now involve not merely the controlling authority of a sport, but also the continuing rights of teams, players and sporting grounds/facilities • Pay TV and FTA have the opportunity to invest in high-fidelity sports programming, and associated merchandising, while ‘low-bandwidth’ players can target niche interests

  14. Contact details: Joanne Jacobs National Centre for Australian Studies Monash University Ph: (03) 9905 9091 Fax: (03) 9905 5238 Mob: 0419 131 077 Email: joanne@joannejacobs.net Internet: http://joannejacobs.net/