CRASH - PDF Document

Presentation Transcript

  1. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel CRASH 2018 Cardiac Panel I have no conflicts of interest or financial disclosures to report Dan Beck, M.D., M.S. University of Colorado VA Eastern Colorado Health Care Goals and Objectives Case Study • 54 y male presents with severe  mitral regurgitation – PMH: CHF exacerbations requiring  admissions 3 times over 1 year – TTE: Bileaflet redundancy with  severe MR, dilated LA, LV fxn 45%,  estimated PASP 58 1. Review right ventricle anatomy and function 2. Discuss the pathophysiology of right ventricular failure 3. Review the echocardiographic evaluation of the right ventricle 4. Identify risk factors for RV failure 5. Discuss management strategies for RV failure • Reluctant to have surgery and  has resisted in the past, now  willing Right Ventricle Anatomy Right Ventricle Normal Function • Larger than the RV by EDV • Lower ejection fraction than LV by 10‐15% – Lower end of normal values ~ 45% • Mass regresses as PVR drops at birth – Adult 1/6ththe LV mass • Better adapted to handle volume overload • Complex shape • Right Ventricle divided into 3  main anatomic areas – Smooth muscular inflow (body or  sinus) – Trabecular apical region – Outflow area (infundibulum or  conus)

  2. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel Right Ventricle Pathophysiology Patho‐anatomical change • Chronic volume overload – Progressive lengthening of base to  apex and septum to free wall – D shaped LV in diastole • Chronic pressure overload – D shaped LV short axis in systole RV Basics RV Post Cardiac Surgery • Immediate survival Rates for post op RV failure ~ 25‐30% • RV systolic dysfunction or severe RV dilation – Present in almost ½ the patients with hemodynamic compromise1 • 2 year all cause mortality2 – RVEF <20%  16.7% – 20‐30% 8.2% – >30% 4.1% • Refractory RV failure post  cardiac surgery needing  prolonged ionotropic  support or RVAD – 0.1% all comers – 2‐3% Heart Transplants – 20‐30% of patients with LVAD 2Bootsma et al. JCVA 2017 1Costachescu 2002 Definitions of RV Function Right Ventricular Dysfunction RV Dysfunction • INTERMACS definition: – CVP > 16 cmH2O – Dilated IVC with absence of  respiratory variation by TTE – Associated clinical features of  venous congestion RV Failure • Need for inhaled vasodilator >48 hours • Intravenous ionotropes > 14 days • Right ventricular assist device

  3. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel Echocardiography Esophageal Views • Evaluating the RV  • Mid Esophageal – Modified 4 chamber – RV inflow‐outflow – Bicaval (for Tricuspid Jet doppler) • Transgastric – Short and long axis – Modified view Midesophageal View Transgastric Views Transgastric views RV Assessment • Tricuspid Annular Plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) – Modified deep transgastric long index • RV Fractional Area Change (FAC) • Tei index/ RV index of myocardial performance (RIMP) – Tissue doppler • 3D TEE • Speckle tracking and strain

  4. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel TAPSE Image m‐TAPSE Diastole Systole Deep Transgastric RV Inflow‐Outflow Echocardiography Caveats • Imaging modality matters • 2D options – TAPSE vs FAC vs speckle tracking • 2D vs 3D – Changes in RV long axis performance – Opening the pericardium? • TTE vs TEE Haddad et al. Anesth Analg 2009;108:407‐21. TAPSE VS FAC Echocardiographic Imaging Modalities Parameter Control Before MV  Repair After MV Repair TAPSE (mm) 25.8 ± 4.4 25.2 ± 4.1 16.6 ± 3.0*† PSV (cm/sec) 16.2 ± 2.3 17.2 ± 3.8 12.0 ± 2.4*† RV EF (%) 65.6 ± 5.7 59.4 ± 6.8† 58.9 ± 5.9† RV FAC (%) 45.4 ± 10.2 42.7 ± 8.1 39.1 ± 6.9† * Versus Pre‐operative value † Versus controls Maffessanti F et al. 2012. JASE 25:701‐08. 

  5. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel TAPSE vs Free wall post CPB Perioperative RVD Risks • Identify Patients at high risk – Long cardiopulmonary bypass runs (>150 min) • Suboptimal Intraoperative myocardial protection • Coronary Embolism or graft occlusion • Lung Injury or mechanical ventilation induced lung injury – ARDS post cardiac surgery ~10% • Heart Transplants – Donor heart ischemia or pre‐op pulmonary vascular dysfunction Avoiding RV Failure Timing • Appropriate Timing of Surgery • Optimizing myocardial protection • Selective Use of Pulmonary Vasodilators • Avoiding liberal transfusion strategies – Avoiding old blood products • Things out of our control – Valvular Induced pre‐op RV failure • Someone waited too long • Acute RV infarction – 1 month wait to allow for RV recovery Surgical Technique Cardioplegia • Beware the RCA obstruction • Retrograde cardioplegia caveats – Thebesian vessels • Data on choice of cardioplegia still to come • Choice and route of cardioplegia • Choice of bypass graft targets – For long term revascularization  – Improve myocardial protection • Addition of tricuspid repair • Atrial and ventricular wires

  6. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel Pulmonary Vasodilation Nitric Oxide • Nitric Oxide • Inhaled Prostagladins • Other inhaled agents • Primary pulmonary vasodilator – No effect on systemic circulation • V‐Q matching • Reduced RV afterload • Negatives‐ – Methhemoglobinemia – Cost – Weaning required • Timing of use Korean J Anesthesiol. 2010 Jan; 58(1): 4–14.  How about Data? Inhaled Prostagladins • Epoprostenol/Iloprost (prostaglandin I2) • Similar effects as NO – Longer half life • Less rebound pulmonary hypertension? • Possible synergistic effect when combined with NO • Negative – Potential for impaired platelet aggregation • LVAD implantation on CPB, multi‐center, blinded trial • About 75 patients per group*: iNO 40ppm vs placebo • Open label cross over for safety • Primary outcome: Reduction in RVD • Outcomes: – No statistical changes in any outcomes • Trends towards shorter mechanical ventilation, RVADs Inhaled Milrinone • Phosphodiesterase type III inhibitor • Adds ionotropic effects vs other inhaled agents • Inhaled has reduced effect on SVR and MAP – With maintaining increased CO, PAP, and PVR reduction • 125 high risk cardiac surgical patients  • Valve or valve‐CABG (complex) operations • Blinded, single inhaled dose pre‐CPB • SV and CO improved • Improved ventricular performance and reduced LA size • No differences in difficulty separating from CPB or RV failure

  7. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel AV Synchrony • Sinus Rhythm maintenance – Cardioversion – Anti‐arrhythmics • Atrial pacing wires in high risk patients Haddad et al Anesth Analg 2009 Ionotropic Support Mechanical Support Options • Is there evidence for one ionotropic agent? • Pros/Cons – Dobutamine – Milrinone – Epinephrine – Vasopressin – Norepinephrine • Impella • RVAD • ECMO • Outcomes data Impella RP RECOVER Right • Cohort A: Post LVAD (n=18) • Cohort B: Post Cardiotomy (n=7) or acute MI (n=5) Cohort A Cohort B Survival to Discharge 83.3% 58.3% 180 day survival 70% 58.3% Anderson MB et al. J Heart Lung Transplant 2015;34:1549–1560 http://www.abiomed.com/impella/impella‐rp.  Accessed 2/26/2018

  8. Dan Beck, MD, MS Cardiac Panel Perioperative RVAD support Summary • Caveats – LVAD surgery, 25 patients, 2 institutions • Pre‐operative RV impairment by TAPSE criteria • Received RVAD therapy after 1 failed wean from CPB • 3 day weaning protocol for RVAD • Hospital survival 68% (vs 70%) of isolated LVAD recipients • Discussion – Integrated ECMO oxygenation with lung protective ventilation • RV failure is rare but can be catastrophic • Beware of pre‐operative RV dysfunction • Many factors are under surgeon’s control • Intraoperative TEE will help guide your decision making • Ionotropes and vasopressors each have pros and cons • There is no perfect solution!