Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  - PDF Document

Presentation Transcript

  1. Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Physiological Basis of  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  Hearing Tests  By Dr. Abdel Aziz Hussein Lecturer of Physiology Mansoura Faculty of Medicine

  2. Introduction  Introduction Def: Hearing is the ability to perceive certain pressure vibrations in the air and interpret them as sound.

  3. Introduction Introduction Sound: Sound: Sound is a longitudinal pressure waves that consists of alternate phases of condensation and rarefaction

  4. Introduction Introduction Physics of Sound: The waves travel through air at a speed of approximately 344 m/s at 20 °C at sea level 1) Pitch or Frequency: Number of waves per unit of time It is measured in cycle/sec or Hertz or Hz. Normally the human ear can hear sounds from 20-20.0000Hz In other animals, notably bats and dogs, much higher frequencies are audible. The maximal sensitivity of the ear is between 1000-3000 Hz. The human voice ranges from 65 to 1000 Hz→ male voice in conversation is about 120 Hz and that of the average female voice about 250 Hz. ? ? ? ? ? ?

  5. Introduction Introduction 1) Pitch or Frequency:

  6. Introduction Introduction 2) Amplitude: The amplitude of a sound wave is a measure of intensity or energy of pressure fluctuations. Amplitude can be measured as the absolute energy passing through an area of one cm2 (dyne /cm2). It can be measured as Bells. ? ? ? Intensity of given sound Sound Intensity in Bells = Log Intensity of standard sound The standard sound equals 0.000204 × dyne/cm2. a value of 0 decibels does not mean the absence of sound but a sound level of an intensity equal to that of the standard. A decibel (dB) is 0.1 bel. ? ? ?

  7. Introduction Introduction 2) Amplitude:  N.B  The loudness of a sound is correlated with the amplitude of a sound wave  and its pitch with the frequency.  The greater the amplitude, the louder the sound; and the greater the  frequency, the higher the pitch.

  8. Introduction Introduction 3) Wave form or Timbre (quality) Pure tone Noisy sound Musical sounds; repeated characteristic pattern of vibration ? ? ?

  9. Introduction Introduction Mechanism of Hearing: The organ of hearing is the ear that consists of; External ear Middle ear Cochlea of the inner ear. ? ? ?

  10. Introduction Introduction Mechanism of Hearing: The organ of Corti (receptor for hearing)

  11. Introduction Introduction Auditory Pathway:

  12. Deafness Deafness Def. ?Deafness means a lack or loss of the sense of hearing, which may be partial or complete. ?Partial loss of hearing is often called hearing loss rather than deafness. ?Deafness can occur in one or both ears.

  13. Deafness Deafness Types:

  14. Deafness Deafness Types: Conductive Deafness Sensorineural Deafness  caused by the inability of the sound to reach the inner ear 1.Otitis media and externa 2. Earwax 3.Tympanic membrane perforation 4.Otosclerosis of bony ossicles Caused by disorders of the inner ear or auditory nerve.  1.Tumors of Brain e.g. acoustic neuroma 2.Neurological disorders e.g. meningitis, and stroke 3.Ototoxic drugs such as: •Aspirin •Antibiotics: streptomycin, and neomycin. 4.Miniere s disease 5. Labyrinthitis  Def.,  Causes  Character -Air conduction is more affected than bone conduction -All frequencies are affected equally. -Both air conduction and bone conduction are affected equally -Some frequencies are affected more.

  15. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Types: 1. Speech tests:→ detect the presence of hearing loss 2. Tuning Fork tests → differentiate between types of deafness 3. Pure Tone Audiometery (PTA)→ Detect the presence of deafness Differentiate between types Determine the degree of hearing loss and speech discrimination ? ? ?

  16. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Speech tests The normal person can hear whisper voice at 6 meters and sound of normal conversation up to 12meters. ? When the person needs shorter distances to hear theses sounds→ presence of hearing loss or deafness ?

  17. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests The frequency of fork may be 128,256, 512, 1024, 2048. The most common frequency used is 512 Hz ? ?

  18. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests The frequency of fork may be 128,256, 512, 1024, 2048. The most common frequency used is 512 Hz ? ?

  19. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests Weber Test Principle: test bone conduction on both ears at same time Equipment: Tunning Fork 512 Hz Procedure : Strike the fork against hard object and place it on the middle of forehead Results: a. Normal person → hears equally on both sides. b. Conduction deafness (one ear) → Sound louder in diseased ear because masking effect of environmental noise is absent on diseased side c. Nerve deafness (one ear) →Sound louder in normal ear

  20. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests Rinne Test Principle: test bone and air conduction on the same ear Equipment: Tunning Fork 512 Hz Procedure :Strike the fork against hard object and place it on mastoid process (bone conduction) until subject no longer hears it, then held in air next to ear (air conduction).

  21. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests Rinne Test Results: Normal person → hears vibration in air after bone conduction is over i.e. air is better than bone conduction = +ve Rinne a. b. Conduction deafness → vibrations in air not heard after bone conduction is over i.e. bone is better than air conduction = -ve Rinne c. Nerve deafness → vibration heard in air after bone conduction is over but for shorter time i.e. air is better than bone conduction but shorter than normal = reduced +ve Rinne

  22. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Tunning Fork tests Schwabach Test Principle: compare bone conduction of patient with that of physician. Equipment: Tunning Fork 512 Hz Procedure : Strike the fork against hard object and place it on the mastoid of patient the place it on mastoid process of physician Results: a. Normal person → patient = physician. b. Conduction deafness (one ear) → patient > physician. c. Nerve deafness (one ear) → patient < physician.

  23. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Pure Tone Audiogram (PTA) Auditory acuity is commonly measured with an audiometer. This device presents the subject with pure tones of various frequencies through earphones. At each frequency, the threshold intensity is determined and plotted on a graph as a percentage of normal hearing. This provides an objective measurement of the degree of ? ? ? ? deafness and a picture of the tonal range most affected

  24. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Pure Tone Audiogram (PTA) Of Normal person

  25. Hearing Tests Hearing Tests Pure Tone Audiogram (PTA) Of Deaf person  Conductive Deafness  Sensorineural Deafness

  26. Thank You Thank You For For Not Listening Not Listening