The image below highlights examples of what a standard drink looks like for different beverage types. 8-9 oz ofmalt liquor(shown in a12 oz glass)== - PDF Document

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  1. Alcohol Misuse: Facts About Risky Drinking How Much Is Too Much? Indicators of Risky Drinking It is easy to drink a lot without realizing it. A standard drink contains about 0.6 fluid ounces of pure alcohol, but many drinks, like a large 22-ounce beer or a mixed cocktail, contain more than one standard drink. The box below lists behaviors associated with risky and problematic drinking. If you respond yes to any of the indicators, read the section on Where to Seek Help. The image below highlights examples of what a standard drink looks like for different beverage types. 8-9 oz of malt liquor (shown in a 12 oz glass) = = ■ Drink more, or longer, than you intend ■ Try to cut down or stop drinking, but are not able to 12 oz of regular beer 5 oz of table wine 1.5 fl oz shot of 80-proof spirits (“hard liquor” – whiskey, gin, rum, vodka, tequila, etc.) = ■ Have to drink more than you once did to get the effect you want ■ Continue to drink even though it makes you feel depressed or anxious or adds to another health problem ■ Spend a lot of time drinking BEER ■ Find that drinking often interferes with daily activities, family, friends and/or work ■ More than once have been arrested or had other legal problems due to drinking about 5% alcohol about 7% alcohol about 12% alcohol about 40% alcohol ■ Experience symptoms of withdrawal when you don’t drink Risky Drinking Risk levels for drinking are determined by the amount you drink during the week and on any single occasion. Use the chart below to determine your level of drinking. Where to Seek Help If you think that you, or someone you know, may be engaging in risky drinking, seek help from medical providers, leaders, or battle buddies. Number of Drinks Male Less than 4 per week 4-14 per week More than 14 per week 5 or more per single occasion Below are some additional resources: Level of Drinking Female Less than 4 per week 4-7 per week More than 7 per week 4 or more per single occasion ■ Contact your primary care manager for referrals and medical assistance Infrequent/light Moderate ■ Afterdeployment.dcoe.mil – mental health videos, e-library resources, and online assessments Heavy ■ Militaryonesource.mil – (800) 342-9647; online, telephone, and face-to-face non-medical counseling Binge ■ DCoE Outreach Center – (866) 966-1020; a 24/7 anonymous information call center Preventing Risky Drinking ■ Military Crisis Line – (800) 273-8255; a 24/7 anonymous crisis hot line Monitoring your alcohol use can help you prevent risky drinking: ■ Set a daily and weekly drinking limit ■ Pace your drinking ■ Record how much you drink each day ■ Avoid situations and triggers that cause you to drink ■ Ask a friend who does not drink to help you stay within your limit Released August 2016 by Deployment Health Clinical Center, a Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Center. This product is reviewed annually and is current until superseded. 301-295-7681 | pdhealth.mil PUID 3933

  2. Impact of Risky Drinking Excessive drinking places your safety and health at risk. See below for some of the effects of risky drinking. ■ Depression ■ Anxiety ■ Insomnia ■ Aggressive behavior ■ Alcohol dependence ■ Memory loss ■ Stroke ■ Hypertension ■ Heart failure ■ Premature aging ■ Frequent colds ■ Reduced resistance to infection ■ Increased risk of pneumonia ■ Cancer of the throat and mouth ■ Breast cancer ■ Inflammation of the pancreas ■ Stomach inflammation ■ Diarrhea ■ Malnutrition ■ Anemia ■ Blood clotting ■ Vitamin deficiency ■ Bleeding ■ Risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, which include physical, behavioral and learning disabilities ■ Painful nerves ■ Numb, tingling toes ■ Impaired sensations leading to falls ■ Type II Diabetes ■ Liver damage ■Motor vehicle crashes ■ Failure to fulfill obligations at work, school and home ■ Men: Erectile dysfunction ■ Women: Unintended pregnancy ■ Sexually transmitted diseases ■ Injury ■ Violence ■ Violent crime ■ Legal problems ■ Impacts service member's readiness References Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). Planning and Implementing Screening and Brief Intervention for Risky Alcohol Use: A Step-by-Step Guide for Primary Care Practices. Atlanta, Georgia: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. U.S. Department of Defense. (2013). 2011 Department of Defense health related behaviors survey of active duty military personnel. Washington DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (2010). Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and your health (NIH Publication No. 13-3770). Retrieved from http://www.RethinkingDrinking. niaaa.nih.gov National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). (n.d.). What Is A Standard Drink? Retrieved fromhttps://www.niaaa.nih.gov/ alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/what-standard-drink   Released August 2016 by Deployment Health Clinical Center, a Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Center. This product is reviewed annually and is current until superseded. 301-295-7681 | pdhealth.mil PUID 3933