HOW DOES YOUR DRINK STACK UP? - PDF Document

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  1. HOW DOES YOUR DRINK STACK UP? Alcohol can be deceiving when it comes to serving size. Many people assume a standard-sized drink is larger than it actually is. Not knowing the size of a standard drink can make it tough to know when you’ve reached your limit. So what is a standard drink? When is drinking considered risky? A standard drink is about 14 grams of pure alcohol (0.6 fluid ounces or 1.2 tablespoons). While thirty percent of Americans are risky drinkers, it’s likely that many don’t know it. Men are risky drinking when they have more than 14 drinks a week or more than four drinks on any occasion. Women are risky drinking when they have more than seven drinks a week or more than three on any occasion. When translated into a drink, that’s a 12 ounce beer, a 5 ounce glass of wine or 1 ½ ounces of 80-proof alcohol. The chart below should give you an idea of how much pure alcohol is in your favorite drink. The actual alcohol content varies by brand and type of drink, so use this chart as a general guide. When you drink more than you should, you risk damaging your brain and liver, increasing your risk for disease and becoming dependent on alcohol. Plus, you might make poor choices like driving while intoxicated, being too trusting of strangers and doing other risky (and sometimes dangerous) things. To find out more, visit healthpartners.com and click on the “Health & Wellness” tab. Here you can find great resources for rethinking drinking like books, websites, community resources and tips. What is considered one drink? 1.5 fl oz of distilled spirits (“hard liquor”) 12 fl oz of regular beer 5 fl oz of table wine These suggestions are general guidance from HealthPartners. However, you should discuss with your provider what makes the most sense for you. The HealthPartners family of health plans are underwritten and/or administered by HealthPartners, Inc., Group Health, Inc., HealthPartners Insurance Company or HealthPartners Administrators, Inc. Fully insured Wisconsin plans are underwritten by HealthPartners Insurance Company.