Low Roughage Diet - PDF Document

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  1. Low Roughage Diet What is roughage? Roughage is the part of food that is not fully digested as it passes through the bowel. Roughage is found in some, but not all, foods. Roughage is sometimes confused with fiber. Fiber is important for digestive health. Some fiber has roughage, but not all fiber contains roughage. Should I follow a low roughage diet? A low roughage diet is recommended when you have an area of stricturing (narrowing) in your intestine (bowel). The goal of a low roughage diet is to reduce the risk of developing a blockage that can happen if you eat foods that are not able to pass through the narrowed area. General diet guidelines and tips: A balanced diet includes fiber-rich foods (but low roughage foods). Fiber plays an important role in your diet, and a low roughage diet is not necessarily the same thing as a low fiber diet. You can have any raw or cooked fruits or vegetables that are mashed well (applesauce or mashed potato consistency), blended to a liquid consistency (smoothie), or finely shredded (carrots, leafy green vegetables). While following this diet, make sure to chew foods well. Foods not recommended Fruits -Fruits with an edible tough peel (apples, persimmons) -Grapes or blueberries, if eaten whole -Stringy raw fruits (rhubarb, pineapple) -Thick membranes of citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes, kumquats) -Large seeds of fruits (watermelon) -Dried fruits Foods recommended -Fruits with a tough peel if peeled before eating (apples, persimmons) -Grapes or blueberries, if chewed well or cut into smaller pieces before eating -Rhubarb, if cooked very soft -Citrus fruits with thin membranes, if chewed well, or if thick membranes are removed before eating -All other types -Vegetables with tough skin if peeled before eating (cucumbers, zucchini) Veggies -Vegetables with tough skin (cucumbers, zucchini), if skin is eaten Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program -1-

  2. Foods not recommended -Whole raw carrots, artichokes, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts -Whole kernel corn -Peas, legumes, lentils, and lima beans that are hard and eaten whole -Stringy raw vegetables (celery, stalks of broccoli or cauliflower) -Raw leafy green vegetables -Vegetables with pits or large seeds (olive pits, large cucumber seeds, okra seeds) Foods recommended -Finely grated or soft cooked carrots, artichokes, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts -Peas, legumes, lentils, and lima beans, if cooked very soft and chopped/mashed or chewed well -Stringy raw vegetables (celery, stalks of broccoli or cauliflower), if cooked to very soft -Leafy green vegetables, if cooked or finely chopped -Vegetables with pits or large seeds (olive pits, large cucumber seeds, okra seeds), if pits or large seeds are removed before eating -All other types -Breads and cereals with small seeds (sesame, poppy, chia) -All other types -Smooth nut butters -Ground meats or meats that are moist and cooked soft -Any soft, moist fish with bones removed -Peas, legumes, lentils, and lima beans, if cooked very soft and chopped/mashed -All other types -All other types -Breads and cereals with large whole seeds, grains, or nuts -Popcorn -Chunky nut butters -Meats with gristle -Fish with bones (sardines, salmon) -Peas, legumes, lentils, and lima beans that are hard and eaten whole Grains Protein -Yogurt with large whole seeds or nuts Dairy Disclaimer: This document contains information and/or instructional materials developed by Michigan Medicine for the typical patient with your condition. It may include links to online content that was not created by Michigan Medicine and for which Michigan Medicine does not assume responsibility. It does not replace medical advice from your health care provider because your experience may differ from that of the typical patient. Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about this document, your condition or your treatment plan. Authors: Kiersten Waineo, RD, CSP and Jeremy Adler, MD, MSc Patient Education by Michigan Medicine is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Public License. Last Revised 01/2019 Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program Low Roughage Diet -2-