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  1. 6 65 5th th Semi Semi- -Annual Undergraduate Annual Undergraduate Student Conference Student Conference December December 10 10, 201 , 2016 6 Wilson Wilson Auditorium Auditorium

  2. Schedule at a Glance 8:00 – 8:30 AM Breakfast & Psi Chi Welcome Table Maryam Srouji, Kelly Moedt, & MK O’Rourke 8:30 – 8:45 AM Wilson Auditorium Welcome Remarks Dr. Gary Lewandowski, Chair, Department of Psychology Dr. Nicolle Parsons-Pollard, Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs Leigh Ricciardi, Psi Chi – President 8:45 – 9:45 AM Wilson Auditorium Paper Presentations: Session I 9:45 – 10:45 AM Poster Presentations: Session I Wilson Lobby 10:45 – 11:45 AM Paper Presentations: Session II Wilson Auditorium 11:45 – 12:30 PM Lunch *Magill Commons* 12:30 – 1:30 PM Paper Presentations: Session III Wilson Auditorium 1:30 – 2:30 PM Poster Presentations: Session II Wilson Lobby Coffee will be available during the session. Department Career Initiative: Free Professional Headshots (Courtesy of Career Services) 2:30 – 3:30 PM Paper Presentations: Session IV Wilson Auditorium 3:30 PM Awards and Closing Remarks Wilson Auditorium Dr. Gary Lewandowski, Chair, Department of Psychology

  3. Paper Presentations: Session I Moderator: Kelly Faxon, Psi Chi 8:45 – 9: 45 AM, Wilson Auditorium Jodi DiSilvestro Equation of Love: The Influence of Stress and Personality on Settling Behavior This study observed the influence of stress and personality on settling behavior. Eighty participants (60 female and 20 male) were randomly assigned to either the stress or no stress condition. The participants were also assigned to the personality type of a satisficer or maximizer based on their answers to the maximizing-satisficing scale. A maximizer is someone who worries a lot about making the perfect decision, while satisficers do not worry much about decisions. It was hypothesized that those in the stress condition would be more likely to settle for a partner less than their ideal relationship standards, it is also hypothesized satisficers would be more likely to settle than maximizers. The final hypothesis was that while under stress, satisficers would be more likely to settle than maximizers, but a stressed maximizer would be more likely to settle than an unstressed satisficer. After running a Two- Way Factorial Analysis of Variance, the main effect of stress was significant, those in the stress condition were more likely to settle than those in the no stress condition. Contrary to the hypothesis, there was no significant effect for personality on settling behavior. Also, contrary to the hypothesis, the results were inconclusive for an interaction between stress and personality on settling behavior. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Taylor Klemm Children’s Day Program, Neptune, NJ: Partial Hospitalization Program Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard Brittany M. D’Annunzio Love and Memories: Passionate and Companionate Love’s Effects on Trait Recall Previous research has demonstrated people’s tendency to ignore partner flaws and highlight partner virtues (Murray et al., 1996), but has not explored how relationship variables, such as passionate and companionate love may help explain the tendency to overemphasize partner virtues. The purpose of the present set of studies is to explore how the experience of passionate and companionate love influence feelings and cognitions about one’s partner. Study 1 examined correlations between self-report measures from 144 undergraduates. As hypothesized, higher levels of companionate love were associated with greater positive emotional experiences and more positive evaluations of partner traits. Study 2 randomly assigned 137 undergraduates to either the companionate love, passionate love, or neutral prime condition before engaging in a memory activity. Also consistent with hypotheses, those primed with companionate love had greater recall and misremembering of positive partner traits, while those primed with passionate love had greater recall and misremembering of negative traits. These results demonstrate how companionate and passionate love influence memory differently. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Zakariya Frank Effect of Age and Disability on Discrimination in the Hiring Process This study examines how ageism (discrimination based on age) and ableism (discrimination based on disability status) can affect the hiring process. A sample of 123 (35 male, 88 female) college students role played a hiring manager for a fictitious company by reviewing a cover letter and resume of a fictitious applicant, and then evaluating the applicant. No signs of ableism were found in the study. Participants were more likely to recommend the 25-year-old applicant than the 60-year-old applicant for the position. The 25-year-old applicant was also on average rated more positively on both personal and professional attributes. These results are indicative of ageism against older individuals in the hiring process. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz

  4. Cali Coulter Who’s The Boss?: The Effects of Power on Relationships This study observed the influence of power styles on relationship longevity, relationship positivity, relationship quality, and relationship and partner dependence. One hundred participants (79 female, 21 male) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: independent female, alpha male, or egalitarian relationship styles. Participants were given a scenario to read about two people in a relationship where either the female had the power, the male had the power, or the power was shared between the two. All participants received the same questionnaire that asked questions based on future equality, functioning qualities, current equality, and needs in a relationship. I hypothesized that those who were assigned to the egalitarian conditioning would rate a more positive relationship compared to those who were in the independent female and alpha male condition. Furthermore, I hypothesized that those in the egalitarian condition would rate a higher dependence to the significant other and the relationship than those in the other conditions. Using a series of One-Way Analysis of Variance with planned contrasts, the results show that those who were assigned to the egalitarian condition based on functioning qualities of a relationship were significantly more likely to rate the relationship as a more positive relationship than those in the independent female and alpha male condition. Also, those in the egalitarian condition based on needs in a relationship were significantly more likely to rate the significant others as more dependent on one another compared to the other conditions. There was no significant difference between independent female and alpha male. Results suggest that egalitarian relationships can lead to a more positive relationship and a more dependent partner. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Tristan Commander The Effect of Emotional Intensity through Eyewitness Accounts, and the Severity of a Crime on Deserved Punishment This study examined how an emotionally upsetting description of a crime and the severity of the crime committed can affect the amount of punishment an individual believes the offender should receive. 133 participants (35 males, 98 females) were randomly assigned to one of four crime related conditions. Each condition stated the crime committed (assault or vandalism) and whether or not the crime was described in an emotionally upsetting manner. Participants were asked to read a fictitious eyewitness testimony and sentence the offender. Participants within both the assault and emotionally charged conditions were more likely to allot the offender a longer prison sentence than those in the opposing conditions. However, no interaction effect was seen between the two variables. Participants were also more likely to mandate that the offender should serve a longer amount of time in prison before being eligible for parole, when the crime committed was assault. By contrast, an emotionally upsetting testimony was seen to be approaching significance. No interaction effect was seen between the two variables. When asked how likely the participant would be to award restitution to the victim, results were significant for the type of crime committed and the prevalence of an emotionally stimulating testimony. An interaction effect was seen between the two variables. A situation presented in an emotionally upsetting way can potentially influence how an individual will respond to the event. This conclusion could be perceived as discerning because jury decision-making should not be based on the impact of emotions. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz Faculty-Student Collaboration: Research Lab Highlight The Gender Development Conference: Toys for Girls, Boys, and Beyond Jessica Clauberg, Margaret Daly, Morgan Lalevee, & Maryam Srouji Supervising Professor: Dr. Lisa M. Dinella

  5. Poster Presentations: Session I 9:45 – 10:45 AM, Wilson Auditorium Lobby Jessica Leahy Adaptive Value of Anxiety: Benefits and Costs Anxiety is one of the most common psychological dysfunctions in the United States and has been the topic of research for many years. Some researchers have emphasized the importance of understanding the evolutionary origin and adaptive value of anxiety in order to assess what is pathological and what is the normal, and when an anxiety response is actually adaptive. These psychologists have suggested that anxiety may have benefits that were selected for over the course of evolution, and treatments to eliminate these benefits would be count-indicated. The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits and costs of feelings of anxiety. Participants were recruited using a convenience sample from the university participant pool (SONA). They completed several questionnaires regarding the level of their everyday anxiety, and the types of costs and benefits that their anxiety may have provided. It was hypothesized that those who scored highest on the anxiety scale would specify the least number of beneficial roles for anxiety compared to those who scored low on the anxiety scale. The results will be compared to the hypotheses and discussed. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Samantha Barnett The Influence of Mate Value on Relationship Preferences and Potential Partner Attributions The present study examined the influence of self-perceived mate value on relationship preferences and potential partner attributions. The goal of the present study was to extend the current literature and research concerning the topics of mate value, partner preferences, and the relationships we tend to form. The sex of the participant, the self-perceived mate value of the participant, and the mate value of the potential partner, all served as the independent variables in this study. Participants’ ratings of the attributes of the potential partner and their ratings of their relationship preferences with the potential partner served as dependent variables. It was predicted that individuals with self-reported low mate value would be more likely to give high ratings to potential partners who also had a low mate value, while individuals with self-reported high mate value would be more likely to prefer partners who also had high mate value. It was also expected that individuals with low mate value would be more likely than people with high mate value to prefer a long- term relationship. Lastly, it was hypothesized that individuals with a high mate value would be more likely to prefer dating or a short-term relationship than people with low mate value. Results will be presented and discussed. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Shannon Otten The Influence of Participant’s Sex and Mate Value on Reasons for Romantic Breakup Past research has focused on how women tend to fall out of love quicker than men do (Rubin, Peplau, & Hill, 1981), suggesting that women are more selective in how much time and energy they are willing to invest in a relationship. This study expands on previous research by focusing on whether mate value influences the reasons for romantic breakups. It was expected that self-reported high mate value participant would be more likely to terminate a romantic relationship than a low mate value participant, and that men would be less likely to breakup than women, based on evolutionary theory. The independent variables included the sex of the participants (male, female), the current relationship status of the participants (single, exclusive relationship), and the participants’ self-reported mate value (low, high). The dependent variables were the participants’ ratings regarding the likelihood of breaking up for each of 10 reasons. Participants completed two surveys about the likelihood of terminating a relationship (i.e., an imaginary, less than ideal relationship; and their current or most recent relationship). They then completed a self-reported mate value inventory. The results found that “their partner having sexual relations with someone else” was ranked as the most likely reason for breaking up, followed by “their partner falling in love with someone else.” Additional results will be presented and discussed. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest

  6. Jenna L. Cupp Mirror, Mirror on the Locker Room Wall: The Relationships between Eating Behaviors and Body Perception Among Division I Female Collegiate Athletes The present study examines female Division I college athletes’ eating behaviors and body perception through the ATHLETE Questionnaire (Hinton, 2005) and the Stunkard, Sorenson, and Schlusinger (1980) Nine Figure Silhouette Scale, hypothesizing that athletes who score lower on the six factors ATHLETE Questionnaire (Hinton, 2005) will be more apt to have a negative perception of their body based on the discrepancy between the participants “current” vs. “ideal” body image. Also, first-year athletes will have a greater likelihood of disordered eating behaviors and distortion of their body image than non-first year student-athletes and that athletes in lean muscle sports will have a greater likelihood of disordered eating and will be more critical of their body perception than mass muscle sports. Among a purposive sample (93 total) who participated online through Qualtrics, 28% were first year students. First-year student athletes were more likely to have healthy feelings about their body (p = .04) than those in the other 3 years. Women in lean muscle sports placed more importance on their athletic identity than those in mass muscle sports (p = .001). These findings suggest that there is less risk of body issues among first-year student-athletes and more vulnerability among the lean muscle athletes in terms of their focus on their athletic identity. Supervising Professor: Dr. Janice C. Stapley Andrew F. Betro Neuropsychology Rehabilitation Services and Life Span Behavioral Health, Neptune, City, NJ neuropsychology private practice Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Kristi Miceli Middletown Village Elementary School, Middletown, NJ, school psychology Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Rachel Ziegler Celtic Charms Therapeutic Horsemanship, Howell, NJ, animal-assisted therapy Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Alyx Lennon Family Resource Associates, Shrewsbury, NJ, non-profit organization supporting individuals with disabilities Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Marisa A. Lacy Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ, animal-assisted therapy Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Tara Hollywood Bradley Beach Elementary School, Bradley Beach, NJ, school psychology Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Tristan Commander Law Offices of Christopher T. Campbell, Wall, NJ: Criminal Law Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard Nicholas Marrero SPURS Special People United to Ride, Lincroft, NJ: Therapeutic Riding and Horsemanship Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard

  7. Paper Presentations: Session II Moderator: Liz Roderick, Psi Chi 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM, Wilson Auditorium Morgan A. Lalevee Meditate on It: Influencing Political Tolerance This study observed the influence of mindfulness on tolerance. One hundred seven participants (21 male, 86 female) were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions: experimental, placebo or empty control. In the experimental condition participants participated in a brief five-minute guided mindfulness meditation, in the placebo condition participants listened to the same mindfulness video but were asked to tally how many noun and verbs were being said, and in the empty control condition participants received no manipulation. All participants filled out three tolerance skills after the manipulation of their condition was completed: the general tolerance scale, interposal tolerance scale and the issue tolerance scale.I hypothesized that those in the experimental mindfulness condition would have the highest levels of tolerance in general, interpersonal and issue tolerance overall compared to those participants that were in the placebo and empty control condition. Furthermore, I hypothesized that those in the placebo condition would have higher levels of general tolerance, interpersonal tolerance and issue tolerance when compared to participants in the empty control condition but lower levels of general, interpersonal and issue tolerance when compared to participants in the experimental condition. Lastly, I hypothesized that participants will be more tolerant towards issues coded as minor political issues versus issues coded as major political issues. Using a series of one-way analysis of variances with planned contrasts, the results show that those in the experimental condition were no more tolerant with general tolerance, interpersonal tolerance or issue tolerance than those in the placebo or empty control condition. However, an exploratory analysis revealed that those in the experimental condition were more tolerant on issue tolerance when compared to participants in the empty control condition. Results suggest that mindfulness can make a person more tolerant towards major and minor political issues. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Genesis Gonzalez The Effect of Race of Victim, Seriousness of Injury, and Type of Crime on Perceptions of Guilt Police officer use-of-force has been extensively debated, with much focus on factors that make individuals more likely to be targets of excessive use-of-force. The current study thus examined how race of victim, seriousness of injury, and type of crime might affect juror decision-making. 118 college students read a summary about a court case describing a police officer who was on trial for excessive use-of-force following an arrest. The participants rated how guilty the police officer was, recommended how much jail time and probation the police officer should serve, and how much restitution the victim should receive. It was hypothesized that the police officer that is being charged with excessive use-of-force would be perceived as guilty when the race of the victim is white, the injuries are major, and the type of crime is child neglect. It was also hypothesized that the police officer that is being charged with excessive use-of-force would be perceived as guilty when the race of the victim is white and the injuries are major. The results for the study show that there were no significant differences for race of victim or type of crime on any of the dependent variables. However, participants in the major injury condition recommending a longer sentence length for the police officer than those who were in the minor injury condition. Rather than just looking at sentence length I also looked at whether the police officer received any jail time. The results indicate that participants were more likely to recommend jail time in general when the race of victim was African-American. Overall, these results suggest that in use-of-force cases the damage sustained by the victim and the race of victim might be deciding factors in juror decision-making. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz

  8. Sabrina Kvalo Decision Making in Relationships: The Effects Logical and Emotional Thinking on Tolerating Bad Behaviors This study observed the ways that logical and emotional thinking affect a person’s willingness to tolerate bad behaviors in relationships. One-hundred participants (20 male, 80 female) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: emotional, logical, or neutral. Participants in the emotional condition were asked to rate the relatedness of words related in meaning to emotion, whereas those in the logical condition were asked to rate the relatedness of words related to logic. Those in the neutral condition were asked to rate the relatedness of words that were neutral in meaning. I hypothesized that those in the logical condition would be less likely to tolerate bad relationship behaviors than those in the emotional and neutral conditions. Additionally, I hypothesized that those in the neutral condition would be more likely to tolerate bad relationship behaviors than those in the logical condition, but less likely to tolerate bad behaviors than those in the emotional condition. Using a series of one-way analysis of variances with planned contrasts, the results revealed that participants in the logical condition were less likely to tolerate bad relationship behaviors. Participants in the neutral condition, however, were not more likely than those in the logical condition to tolerate bad relationship behavior, nor were they less likely to tolerate these behaviors than those in the emotional condition. These results suggest that people may be less likely to tolerate bad behaviors in their relationships if they look at their relationships objectively, rather than allowing their emotions to guide their decision making. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Erica L. Davis The Effects of Peer Pressure on Decision Making The purpose of this study was to test whether type of peer pressure and type of cheating had an effect on willingness to engage in cheating behavior. 123 undergraduate participants from a convenience sample read a scenario about a potential cheating opportunity in either an academic or romantic setting. Participants read about an experience involving either positive peer pressure, negative peer pressure or a mixture of both. They then answered a brief survey about what they would do in the situation. Type of peer pressure made no difference in whether participants would cheat. However, as hypothesized, participants in the academic cheating condition were significantly more likely to cheat than those in the romantic condition. These results are important because they indicate that while students are more likely to cheat on an exam than on their romantic partner, peer pressure has no effect on their willingness to cheat. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz Jessica R. Banister Attitudes Towards Others: Effects of Exposure on Attitudes Towards Persons With Special Needs This study measured participants’ attitudes towards persons with special needs after being exposed to someone with Angelman’s syndrome. One hundred seventeen participants (94 females and 23 males) were randomly assigned to three different conditions: knowledge of diagnosis, someone to relate to, and how unique someone can be. Participants were to read a short biography in order to gain exposure towards someone with special needs. After being exposed, participants completed an attitudes scale and a demographic questionnaire. It was hypothesized that participants who gain knowledge about the diagnosis will possess the most positive attitudes towards persons with special needs. It was also hypothesized that seeing the person as a unique individual would create the least positive attitudes. A One-Way Analysis of Variance showed that contrary to the hypothesis, participants in the unique condition had the highest overall attitudes towards persons with special needs. Participants in the knowledge condition had the second highest and the relatable condition had the least positive attitudes. These results suggest that seeing people as the unique individuals they are creates the most positive attitudes towards that person. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski

  9. Julianne Calvano The Effect of Environmental Images on Physiological and Psychological Stress This study examined the influence of environmental images on physiological and psychological measures of stress. Eighty- four students from Monmouth University’s online research pool were given three environmental images to view. The images included two natural environments, a savanna (grassland) and a dense forest, and one urban city environment. First, the student’s baseline pulse and blood pressure readings were taken. After viewing the first image, the participant’s pulse was taken, a stress questionnaire was filled out, and blood pressure was taken. This procedure was repeated for the two other images. Females reported higher levels of stress compared to males, and stress levels were higher for the image of the urban environment compared to the other environmental images. The dense forest environment was rated the most desirable whereas the urban environment was the least desirable. Pulse rate increased from baseline after viewing the savanna and urban environments. Both Systolic and Diastolic blood pressure decreased from the baseline for all the images. In general, the results support the hypothesis that natural environments provide a restorative emotional state while man-made urban environments increase psychological and physiological stress. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Taylor S. Robustelli Your Mortality and Your Relationship: Influencing Communication Behaviors This study observed the influence of mortality salience on communication behaviors. One hundred and five participants (87 female, 17 male) involved in a romantic relationship were randomly assigned to either the mortality of self, mortality of partner, or cleaning condition. Depending on condition, participants were given two open-ended questions to make thoughts about mortality of self, mortality of partner, or cleaning, salient. Post thought manipulation, participants completed a communication questionnaire to assess communication desires, and an attachment questionnaire. It was hypothesized that those in the mortality of self condition would desire the most communication with their romantic partners compared to those in the mortality of partner, and cleaning conditions. It was also hypothesized that those in the mortality of self condition would be the most willing to communicate with their romantic partners about mortality. Using a series of one-way analysis of variances with planned contrasts, results revealed desires for regular communication and communication about death, did not significantly differ between the three conditions. Contrary to hypothesis, results revealed participants in the cleaning condition desired significantly more in person communication with their romantic partners than those in the mortality of self condition. Moreover, results revealed a significant difference between the three conditions and desire to initiate communication about partner’s organ donation decisions. Participants in the mortality of self condition demonstrated the highest desire to ask their romantic partner’s about his/her organ donation decisions. Results suggest thoughts about mortality of self may facilitate communication about end of life decisions. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski

  10. Paper Presentations: Session III Moderator: Jodi DiSilvestro, Psi Chi 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM, Wilson Auditorium Mallory L. Inselberg Effects of Stereotypes on Impression Formation and the Interview Process The current study examined the effects of stereotypes regarding psychological disorders and criminal records on the employment process. The hypotheses were tested with 120 college students from an American university. Individuals were asked to review a cover letter and resume, watch an interview, and complete a questionnaire. The results of the analysis indicated that individuals with depression or a conviction of vandalism were not seen as more reliable, more competent, more likely to be hired, or earn more money than individuals with schizophrenia or a conviction of assault. Individuals with depression and convicted of vandalism were not seen as more reliable, more competent, more likely to be hired, or earn more money than individuals with schizophrenia and convicted of assault. These results imply that having a psychological disorder and criminal record has no effect on impression employment. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz Marissa Stiuso Long Branch Middle School, Long Branch, NJ, school psychology Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Meaghan Barry Best Friend, Lover, Spouse: What Do You Want? This study was interested in finding out people's’ preferences towards personality traits that were related to political parties. One hundred-twenty participants (14 male, 106 female) completed this study which consisted of 55% liberals and 45% conservatives. Individuals were asked to fill in an online survey where they would rate their preferences for multiple personality traits on a 7 point scale to identify what they would want for a best friend, dating partner and marriage partner. These personality traits were related to liberalism or conservatism but the participants did not know that while completing the survey. I hypothesized that participants will prefer liberal traits for their best friend, dating partner and marriage partner over conservative traits. After completing a 3x2 within subjects design, the results indicated that individuals prefer conservative traits slightly more for best friend over liberal traits. To add, participants strongly preferred conservative traits for dating partner and marriage partner over liberal traits. This suggests individuals do not mind as much what traits best friends have, but put more emphasis on the qualities their dating and marriage partner possess. The trait that was very important to the participants for dating and marriage partners was politeness which is related to conservatism. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Daniel Jefferson How do Skin Shades Affect the Relationships we Form and How we Think about Others? This study evaluated the impact that a person’s skin shade can have on their relationships with others (i.e., friendship, short-term romantic relationship, long-term romantic relationship). Participants were given a shade preference scale that asked which shades from dark to light were preferred (e.g., most attractive, which skin shade would they like to be). They then viewed images of people of the opposite sex having different skin tones (light skinned, brown skinned, dark skinned) and completed an attribution scale asking participants to rate how likely the person in the picture would exhibit a series of traits. It was hypothesized that the participants would rate lighter shaded people as having more preferable traits and that they would be more likely to want to have a relationship with the lighter skinned people (i.e., as a friend, a date, a sexual encounter, a short and a long term romantic relationship). Results will be presented and discussed in the context of these hypotheses. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest

  11. Kasi L. Pierno Influence of Prosocial Behavior on Self-Esteem and the Relevance of Similarity This study examines how learning about someone who consistently engages in prosocial behavior influences one’s self- esteem and if whether or not we are similar to the person matters. It was hypothesized that the exposure to consistent prosocial behavior will lead to low self-esteem, especially if that someone is similar to oneself. 123 (27 males, 96 females) college students read a mock reference letter and application of a student applying for a scholarship award and completed a questionnaire regarding the applicant as well as the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The two main effects for prosocial behavior and similarity were not significant. There was also no interaction effect. However, it was found that those in the prosocial behavior condition spontaneously reported completing more hours of community service in a semester than those not in the prosocial behavior conditions. It was also found that those in the prosocial behavior conditions highly evaluated the applicant. The findings suggest that brief exposure to someone who consistently engages in prosocial behavior may not influence self-esteem, but can influence judgments of own prosocial behavior and evaluations of others. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz Nia Driver The Influence of Race on Perceptions of Beauty and Attraction This study evaluated the influence that race and skin tone has on perceptions of attractiveness. Undergraduate college students (N=120) viewed color images of the faces of young African Americans of the opposite sex and read a brief biography of each person. The biographies differed only in the mention that the person pictured was either African- American or Mixed race. An attraction questionnaire and a dating questionnaire were then completed with a distraction task inserted between the two questionnaires. Participants also completed a self-report survey indicating whether they were aware of the manipulation. It was predicted that the people in images described as mixed-race would receive higher attraction ratings than those described as single-race. Also, those images that featured a light skin tone were predicted to receive higher attraction ratings than images that featured darker skin-tones. A medium skin tone was expected to receive higher attraction ratings than the images depicting the darkest skin tone. Results and discussion will compare the hypotheses with the actual findings. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Victoria L. Howe Hooking-Up This study observed what factors influence people’s perception of “the hook-up culture”. One hundred and twelve participants (19 male, 93 female) completed an online survey consisting of four questionnaires. These questionnaires measured participants’ fear of intimacy, sociosexuality, influence of the false consensus effect, and perception of “the hook-up culture”. I hypothesized that people who had a fear of intimacy, an unrestricted sociosexuality, and were greatly influenced by the false consensus effect, would perceive a greater “hook-up culture”. Using correlations the results show that those with an unrestricted sociosexuality do perceive a significantly greater hook-up culture than those with a restricted sociosexuality. Those who are greatly influenced by the false consensus effect also perceive a significantly greater “hook-up culture” than those who are less influenced by the false consensus effect. However, there was no significant difference in perception of the “hook-up culture” between those with a fear of intimacy and those without a fear of intimacy. These results suggest that the “hook-up culture” may not actually exist, but is only perceived by those who actively hook-up and who are led to believe that others do the same. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski

  12. Poster Presentations: Session II 1:30 – 2:30 PM, Wilson Auditorium Lobby Brittany Arpaio The Impact of Mate Value and Gender on Reasons for Breaking Up Among College Students The current study examines the effects of gender, self-perceived mate value, and the mate value of a hypothetical partner on reasons for breaking up in relationships. It was predicted that males would report higher self-perceived mate value than females. Also, it was hypothesized that participants with high self-perceived mate value would be more likely to break up with a hypothetical partner than participants with low self-perceived mate value. A convenience sample of college students (57 males, 111 females) completed a mate-value inventory, viewed a profile containing a picture and biography of a hypothetical partner, and answered a questionnaire regarding reasons for breaking up with the hypothetical partner. Analysis of variance revealed many significant sex differences among the reasons for breaking up and an overall greater likelihood of terminating relationships by females (M=85.0) compared to males (M=78.8); F (1,166) = 13.46, p < .0001. The mate value of the participants was also a significant overall factor in breaking up (F (1,166) = 4.77, p < .03), but, counter to the prediction, high MV participants were less likely to breakup than low MV participants. As predicted, the self-perceived mate value of males was higher than females (F (1,166) = 6.732, p < .01). These findings indicate that gender and mate value do impact our reasons for breaking up but not always in the ways we expect. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Alyssa Viscione The Influence of Parental Relationships and Conflict within the Home on Levels of Trust and Hesitancy in Offspring’s Romantic Relationships The present study examined the influence of parental relationships (married, divorced) and conflict in the home (low, high) on the adult offspring’s level of hesitancy and trust in initiating and maintaining romantic relationships. Parental relationship status, level of conflict within the home, and sex of participants served as the independent variables. Level of hesitancy to enter a romantic relationship and level of trust in romantic partners served as the dependent variables. It was hypothesized that the offspring of divorced/separated parents would display less trust in a romantic partner and greater hesitancy to enter romantic relationships than the offspring of married parents. It was also hypothesized that participants who witnessed a high level of conflict in the home would display less trust in romantic partners and greater hesitancy to enter romantic relationships than participants who witnessed a low level of conflict in the home. Results will be presented and discussed in the context of these hypotheses. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Cierra Harris Lisa Harmon Mollicone, LLC, Freehold, NJ, substance abuse counseling Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Richard Felicetti Old Bridge Public Schools, Old Bridge, NJ, school psychology Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Emily Curran Voyagers Community School, Eatontown, NJ, nontraditional, progressive school Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin

  13. Joseph C. Codario Long Branch Senior Center, Long Branch, NJ, gerontology and recreational therapy Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Gerber Bolanos Meal at Noon, Long Branch, NJ, free lunch program Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Alexandra Soubasis Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Children’s Day Program, Neptune, NJ, children’s behavioral health program Supervisor: Dr. Goodwin Meaghan Barry Direct Development PR, Hazlet, NJ: Marketing and Public Relations Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard Louis Koolidge Lisa Harmon Mollicone, LCSW, Freehold, NJ: Drug and Alcohol Counseling Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard Haley Long Howell High School, Howell, NJ: School Psychology and Guidance Counseling Supervising Professor: Dr. Hatchard

  14. Paper Presentations: Session IV Moderator: Allison Kramer, Psi Chi 2:30 – 3:30 PM, Wilson Auditorium Jacqueline K. Duvally The Relationship between Women’s Resources, a Potential Mate’s Resources, her Mate Choice, and Jealousy This study examined the relationship between a woman’s economic resources and her desire for certain characteristics in a mate, i.e., whether the potential mate had fewer, similar, or greater resources than herself. Questions also asked what types of relationships she would be interested in, and the degree of her jealousy in several jealousy-producing scenarios. Heterosexual females were randomly assigned to read one of three biographies of a female. One biography was about a woman who was clearly high status and had extensive resources (a CEO), another concerned a woman with moderate status and resources (a career woman), and a third focused on a woman with limited status and resources (a single mother). Participants were asked to imagine they were the woman in the biography they read and rate the importance of 11 traits of a potential male partner, e.g., he is trusting, he is a CEO, and he is funny. It was predicted that the women who read the high resource biography would desire a mate with even greater resources than their high status avatar. Participants were also asked to rate how jealous they would feel in several jealousy-invoking situations regarding their desired mate. It was predicted that the participants who read the high resource female biography would exhibit less jealousy than the participants who read the moderate or low resource biographies. A series of MANOVAs were used to analyze the data. Results will be described in the context of evolutionary theory and will be presented and discussed. Supervising Professor: Dr. Demarest Nicole M. Cappuccino Design Your “Perfect” Partner: The Role Self- Knowledge has on Partner Preferences This study observed the relationship between self- knowledge and romantic partner preferences. One hundred and eight participants (15 male, 93 female) completed questionnaires to assess self- knowledge. Self- knowledge was measured by scales of self- concept clarity and self- esteem. The participants then completed an activity to determine if their individual partner preferences were “good” or “bad” in terms of relationship quality based on previous research. I hypothesized that those who had high levels of self- knowledge would choose better partner qualities than those who scored low on self- knowledge. I also hypothesized that those who had a high level of self- knowledge would choose their partner preferences quicker than those who had lower levels of self- knowledge. Using a series of Pearson R analyses, the results indicate a trend toward significance that people with high self- knowledge actually picked worse partner qualities. Additionally, self- knowledge was not significantly related to partner preference speed. Results suggest that high self- knowledge provokes individuals to pick a subordinate romantic partner. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Sarah Kellett The Effect of Size of Lie and Motivation on Perceptions of Liars The present study examines how the motivation behind a lie, and the size of a lie affect one’s perception of the liar. 139 undergraduate students were asked to read a brief vignette describing a situation in which two students were caught cheating on an assignment. It was hypothesized that participants who read vignettes describing altruistic lies would have a more positive perception of the liar as opposed to participants who were exposed to egoistic lies. It was also expected that participants in the outright lie groups would perceive the liar more negatively than participants in exaggeration groups. Results supported both hypotheses and approached significance on the interaction effect, hypothesizing that the liar who told egoistic, outright lies would be perceived the most negatively. Results of this study provide a second view toward deception. It is important to acknowledge the benefits of deception and to realize that lying is not always immoral. This viewpoint can provide relief to so many of us who struggle with cognitive dissonance as we grow to become liars. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz

  15. Alexandria N. Bleich Deal or No Deal: The Effect of Resilience, Grit and Relationship Self-Efficacy on Deal Breakers This study examines how resilience, grit and relationship self-efficacy relate to differences in mate choice. One hundred (21 males, 79 females) college students completed various surveys to assess resilience, grit, relationship self-efficacy. Participants also rated a list of 20 deal breakers and 20 annoyances for severity in the context of short term and long term romantic relationships. I hypothesized that those who are high in resilience would rate deal breakers and annoyances as less severe than their less resilient counterparts. Additionally, I hypothesized that individuals who are high in grit would rate deal breakers and annoyances as less severe than their less gritty counterparts. Finally, I hypothesized that those who are high in relationship self-efficacy would rate deal breakers and annoyances as less severe than their less resilient counterparts. Using a series of correlations, results indicate that these hypotheses were significant. Resilience was correlated with rating deal breakers as less severe in long term and short term relationships. Relationship self-efficacy was also correlated with rating deal breakers as less severe in short term relationships. However, there was no significant correlation between grit and deal breakers. These findings suggest that positive personality traits such as resilience and relationship self-efficacy may have negative implications on dating choices. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Marina Shafik Me, Myself, and My Boss: Leadership Style Preference and the Employee’s Personality Type The present research looks at the employee and how their personality leads them to prefer a specific type of manager. In turn, the relationship between the employee and their manager, good or bad, affects the organization overall (Arnold, Connelly, Walsh, & Ginis, 2015). The challenger leader is a combination of the authoritative, the pacesetting, and the coaching leadership styles. The Cheerleader leader is a combination of the affiliative, the democratic, and the pacesetting leadership styles (Goleman, 2000). Employees who are categorized as satisficers are individuals who are satisfied with their decisions while maximizers prefer to maximize on all their choices which involves a great deal of self-reflection (Schwartz, Ward, Monterosso, Lyubomirsky, White, & Lehman, 2002). The leadership styles and personality types were combined to measure level of personal happiness, loyalty to the boss, level of stress, and overall tolerance of the boss. I hypothesized that those who are satisficers working for cheerleader bosses will experience the highest level of personal happiness, show more loyalty to their boss, experience the least amount of stress, and express more tolerance towards that boss. One hundred and eighty-five Monmouth University participants (147 women, 38 men) were instructed to complete a personality test, evaluate a description of a potential boss, then rate different aspects of the leadership style presented. Using a general linear model and a median split, it was concluded that participants found the cheerleader boss less stressful while satisficers experienced less stress. Therefore, satisficers working for cheerleaders experienced the least amount of stress making the first hypothesis significant. It was determined that although the challenger boss stressed his employees, regardless of their personality, the employees still demonstrated more loyalty and liked the challenger boss more than the cheerleader boss. Supervising Professor: Dr. Lewandowski Victoria A. Wright Would You Swipe Right for Me? A Study of the Effect of Attachment Style on Romantic Desirability This study examines how a potential mate’s perceived attachment style can influence their romantic desirability, and whether or not that desirability depends on whether a long term or short term relationship is desired. 105 heterosexual female college students were given either a Tinder or Match.com profile and asked to rate the profile on physical and social attraction. Each profile depicted an individual with either secure, anxious, or avoidant attachment in the “about” section. Results showed that those given a securely attached individual reported higher attraction than those given the other attachment styles. There was no difference between the Match.com or Tinder profiles in terms of attraction, and there was no interaction between attachment style and desired relationship length on attraction either. This shows that perceived attachment style is appealing on its own and does not change in context of relationship length. Supervising Professor: Dr. Strohmetz

  16. Jodi, We could not be more proud of you!! Everything you ever set out to do, you put all your passion and commitment into. Everyday you amaze us with all your accomplishments. We have enjoyed watching you grow into the amazing, mature, independent and responsible woman you are. Now we are anticipating watching you achieve you future goals. We love you, Mom & Dad Brittany, Congratulations! We are so proud of you. You worked hard and proved to yourself and everyone what you are capable of. Dream on and achieve on. We know that you will succeed in all you set out to do. Love, Aunt Rosey and Uncle Joe

  17. Brittany Congratulations to my precious granddaughter!!! To My Beautiful To My Beautiful Granddaughter Brittany Granddaughter Brittany You are the most caring and thoughtful person I know. Good Luck on your presentation. Wish I was able to be there. I am so PROUD of you! It is no SURPRISE of your accomplishments. You will continue to succeed. I know you will do great. With all my blessings Love Love Grandma xoxoxo Grandma Viola Cali, From grammar to grade to high school and now college….a long road with twists and turns. You have always navigated with a level head and a heart of gold. As parents we couldn’t be more proud. May your kindness sparkle and shine as you reach for the stars and always see the light. We love you, Mom, Dad & Connor

  18. Morgan— presentation today! We are all so very proud of you and everything you continue to accomplish at Monmouth! All the best with your Love, Dad, Tricia, Taylor & Carly Dear Ally, We are so proud of you, and all that you’ve accomplished in life! You are a wonderful sister to Emily, and fill our lives with so much joy and laughter. You’ve worked incredibly hard since you were so young, and you should be so proud of all of the challenges you’ve faced and overcome. We know you will continue to make a positive impact on the world, and we look forward to watching you grow. Be happy, be proud, but never forget how much we adore you! Love always, Mom and Dad

  19. Congratulations on Presenting Your Thesis! Jessica Bannister Meaghan Barry Alex Bleich Nicole Cappuccino Cali Coulter Brittany D’Annunzio Jodi Disilvestro Victoria Howe Sabrina Kvalo Morgan Lalevee Taylor Robustelli Marina Shafik (Shafik, 2016) I’m extremely proud of this group. The way each of you rose to the challenges and supported each other throughout the semester epitomizes what the thesis experience should be. You’ve all come a long way since August, and should be impressed with what you’ve accomplished. I know I’m impressed. _Dr. L Wuz Here Brittany, Congratulations! Brittany, All of your hard work and dedication has paid off! I am so proud of everything that you have accomplished. You made a tremendous impact at your internship and helped so many people. Also, you did an amazing job on your thesis! We Love You! Good luc k on your presentation. Y our dedic ation and hard w ork w ill definitely pay off. Love, Dan and Sadie Love, Unc le J immy and Aunt Christine

  20. Marina, Our Love, Congratulations on your thesis and earning your degree! We are beyond proud of what you have accomplished. You are our inspiration. We will always be there to support you every step of the way! We love you so much! Love Mom, Dad, and Veronica CONGRATULATIONS NICOLE! Well, looks like you’ve made it! We are so proud of you on this day of your thesis presentation. Your sense of responsibility and commitment, passion, and enthusiasm for everything you do is amazing. We have always said that we couldn’t ask for more from you in your academic pursuits than the standards you set for yourself. Those high standards have been a blessing and, at times, a curse, but you have persevered and have many accomplishments to show for your determination. In addition to your academic accomplishments, you have gained experience and life lessons that are irreplaceable. We know that this is just the next step in a fulfilling career and life ahead for you. Remember the three “seas” – Chances, Choices, Changes. Keep believing in yourself and reach for the stars – the best is yet to come! Love, Mom, Dad, Amanda, Libby, Fendi and Lou Bear.

  21. Great Job Emily! Great Job Emily! We are so proud of you and admire your determination and hard work. To Kasi, My best and truest friend. I'm so glad I was able to be there for you every step of the way. I've seen you go through every research class and now you're officially done. Celebrate and be proud, you deserve it! It’s so nice to see you embracing your education and excelling in all you do. We can’t wait to see what the future holds for you. Love, Bennie Love you! Mom, Dad, Sam & Bailey To our Dear Alyx To our Dear Alyx, , We are so proud of you in how We are so proud of you in how far you have come. You truly are have come. You truly are the hardest working person we know. working person we know. Good Good luck in your future endeavors. luck in your future endeavors. We love you very much! We love you very much! Grandma and Grandpa Grandma and Grandpa far you the hardest

  22. Congratulations Erica! We couldn’t be more proud of you! You’ve worked hard these past four years and you’ve excelled in all you’ve accomplished! We’re so excited to see what the future holds for you. Wishing you all the happiness in the world! Love - Mom, Dad, Michelle, Billy & Sami Congratulations Victoria We are so proud of you and everything you have accomplished. To see the results of all your hard work, focus and dedication to detail is amazing. We are truly fortunate to be here today to listen to your presentation. There is no doubt that you will be a great success in all your undertakings going forward and will enjoy much success in the future. Enjoy the rest of your school year as it will go by all too fast! Approach your career after you graduate with the same enthusiasm that you brought to your academic career. Love, Mom and Dad!

  23. Kasi Lee Pierno Yay! What a significant accomplishment! Your intelligence, willingness and determination have paid off. Dreams don’t work unless you do. May the spotlight shine on you always, you deserve the best! Kasi, We are so proud of you and all you have achieved. Congratulations! We love you, Dad, Christine, Stephen, Christopher and Robert Congratulations Mallory!!!! Words cannot express how proud we are of you. You have worked so hard to get where you are today that I am tearing up just thinking of what you have accomplished. You are an amazing woman, and have proven time and time again to us that there is NOTHING you cannot do! I cannot wait to see what you will do next. WE are so proud to call you our daughter.... We love you tons, Dad, Mom, Alexis, Zach, Max, and def Milton (who sits outside your door till you get home every night)

  24. Congratulations Congratulations Al Alexandria Nicole Bleich exandria Nicole Bleich Words alone cannot express the pride and joy that I feel being able to call you my daughter and my friend. You, Alexandria, are a true inspiration. You have proven that you can do anything you put your mind to -- with hard work and perseverance. Your resilience allowed you to overcome the many obstacles that you have faced, landing on your feet with your head held high. You have a true passion for your field, and that passion has allowed you to blossom into a caring, compassionate, independent, beautiful young woman. Always, believe in YOU, and be the best YOU that YOU can be. Your future is bright. Don’t Stop Believin’ and enjoy the Journey! You made it through Senior Thesis and I look forward to your presentation. You will forever be my baby girl. Love you to pieces to the moon and back! Mom (MommaDukes) Victoria, We are so happy for you! Did you think when we left you all alone at Monmouth University your freshman year that time would go by so quickly? You have worked so hard and accomplished so much. We know you will be successful in all your endeavors because you are a smart and determined young woman. Be happy and love what you do. We are honored to be here for your thesis presentation. We love you and are so proud of you and think you are wicked awesome. (Because, after all, you are from Massachusetts.) Congratulations, Mom, Dad, Christina, and all your family

  25. Taylor Robustelli, We are so proud of you. We love you always. Grandma Lynn and Papa Taylor Robustelli, Congratulations! We are not sure who is more excited that your thesis is finally finished. You or Us. We are very proud of all your accomplishments this year. Your hard work has paid off and your Thesis is amazing. Maybe now you can get some sleep. Reach for the stars Baby Angel! Love, Mom , Dad, and Andie Elle

  26. Taylor Robustelli, Congratulations on such a great accomplishment. I’m so very proud of you. All my love, Billy Congratulations Zak We are so proud of all that you have accomplished The past four years have flown by. Keep pushing forward, striving for excellence and You will accomplish your goals. Wishing you a lifetime of success and happiness. Love Forever and Always, Mom, Dad and Aliyah

  27. Victoria Wright, Erica Davis, Zak Frank, Mallory Inselberg, Sarah Kellett, Kasi Pierno, Tristan Commander, & Genesis Gonzalez You Are All the Best! -- Dr. S Tris, Dear Tristan, “A Goal Without A Plan is Just A Wish” We are so proud of watching how hard you work every day. You do whatever it takes to complete your assignments or study for an exam. We are so excited and honored to be here watching your presentation during this conference. The world has only begun to experience all your amazing talents and enthusiasm for life. The sky is the limit! I can’t even put into words how proud I am of everything you’ve accomplished. The sleepless nights, 2 a.m. Red Bull runs, and letting me play Madden on mute while you do your homework (HaHa) have all paid off! I’m sorry I couldn’t be there for your presentation due to work, but I’ll be cheering you on from my desk! The amount of effort you put into your work is truly admirable. Thank you for being the best girlfriend and hardest worker! Have fun with your presentation and enjoy the day! “Organize your life around your dreams – and watch them come true.” Love you to the moon and back, Love, Karen, Jim and Daisy Dylan

  28. Congratulations Brittany!! We are so proud of you. Looking forward to hearing your thesis today. “Success is no accident. It is hard work, perseverance, learning, studying, sacrifice and most of all, love of what you are doing or learning to do.”Pele We have always admired your hard work and the time and effort you put forth in everything you do. We love you very much and wish nothing but the best for you. Dad, Mom, Anthony, and Louie DEAR ZAK, CONGRATULATIONS ON ACCOMPLISHING THIS NEXT MILESTONE IN YOUR LIFE. YOU WILL ALWAYS BE MY BRIGHT AND SHINING STAR. LOVE, GRANDMA

  29. Congratulations and thanks to all of my wonderful interns and research assistants this semester! We accomplished so much together. Can’t wait until the Spring! Amanda, you’ve been an excellent lead research assistant and continue to impress! Rich, you always bring interesting ideas and I look forward to seeing your Honors thesis take shape! Juliana, you have jumped in and become an important and valued member of the group! Genesis, your work is always impressive. You have a bright future ahead of you! Alone we can accomplish many things. Together we can change the world. – Estefania Estrada Most fondly, Dr. Hatchard Congrats to my internship students! Tristan * Meaghan * Haley * Nick * Louis * Taylor I enjoyed our small, but mighty class! I love how supportive you were to each other and how you embraced your experiences with open minds, and a willingness to grow, learn, be challenged and refine your career choices. May you all find success, whatever you define it to be. Most fondly, Dr. Hatchard