SCOLIOSIS: - PDF Document

Presentation Transcript

  1. SCOLIOSIS: what is new and true? Natural history, screening/evaluation and treatment Kathleen Moen MD Swedish Pediatric Specialty Update January 24, 2020

  2. OBJECTIVES • 1) review of entity adolescent idiopathic  scoliosis • 2) review the natural history of treated and  untreated disease • 3) review screening recommendations and  delineating patients who warrant referral • 4) review of treatment modalities 

  3. Scoliosis • Definition:  a lateral spinal  curvature measuring at  least 10 degrees on xray • Complex 3 dimensional  spinal deformity

  4. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • AIS: Scoliosis most often develops  and progresses during the most  rapid times of growth, typically  between ages 10 ‐15 years. • NOT  infantile or juvenile scoliosis which have different natural history  profiles • spinal dysraphism NOT congenital spinal deformities, neuromuscular scoliosis or 

  5. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • Classic Teaching – Small curves are common – Progression occurs during most rapid times of  growth – Female predominance  – Big curves get bigger – Etiology unclear: familial predisposition, and?  – Idiopathic scoliosis not typically painful

  6. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • Mild scoliosis curves are  common, affecting 2‐3% of the  adolescent population, males and  females equally • Less than 0.1% of adolescents  have curves greater than 40  degrees. • Ratio of females to males 10:1 Cobb Angle    Female:Male     Prevalence >10                  1.4‐2 :1             2 ‐ 3 % >20                      5:1                .3 ‐ .5 % >30                    10:1                 .1 ‐ .3 % >40                    10:1                 <0.1% Weinstein, SL  Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis, Prevalence and  Natural History.    Instructional Course Lecture, 1988.

  7. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • RISK FACTORS FOR CURVE  PROGRESSION – Female gender – Skeletal immaturity » If curve greater than 30 degrees before peak height  velocity, strong likelihood of progressing to surgical  magnitude     Sanders at al   JBJS 2008 – Curve magnitude » Big curves get bigger – Curve location » Thoracic > double major > lumbar » Thoracic curves and double major curve have progression rate 25‐30%  compared to single lumbar or thoracolumbar curves which progressed  10‐15% » Soucacos et al Eur Spine J 1998

  8. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • How do we measure skeletal  maturity in relation to scoliosis  Risser stage:  0‐ 5  (pelvis image on scoliosis  xray) Sanders Stage  1‐8  (on hand xray) • •

  9. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • Risk of Curve Progression • If curve is > 30 degrees before peak height velocity, there is strong likelihood  of curve progressing to surgical range.

  10. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Age at Detection Curve Magnitude           10‐12          13‐15            16 year • <19 degrees                   25%               10%                0% • 20‐29 degrees               60%                40 %              10 % • 30‐39 degrees               90%                70 %              30% • >40 degrees                  100%               90%              70% » » Weinstein  JPO, 2019 50 yr follow up of untreated cohort of AIS patients

  11. AIS:   ETIOLOGY • ETIOLOGY unclear, but thought to be  attributable to:  • genetic factors • ? linkage of scoliosis and sites on chromosomes  6,10,12,and 18 • nutrition • Low Vit D levels associated with  increased risk of curve progression • early exposure to toxins  • Methyl donors, polyphenols, zinc,  selenium, and Vit A may trigger  methylation of DNA • hormonal dysregulation  • Melatonin levels decrease significantly  with increased curve progression.  Melatonin receptor polymorphisms  seem to have a role in development of  AIS. 

  12. AIS: ETIOLOGY • ETIOLOGY: – GENETIC FACTORS • Danish Twin Registry study found that monozygotic twins had a  higher concordance rate (.4) than dizygotic twins (0.05)   » Simony et al.   Spine 2016 – Study of family pedigrees of 131 patients with AIS found familial  scoliosis connection in 127, and suggested that 1 or 2 majors genes  likely responsible.  The genes under investigation encode for  extracellular matrix components and hormone receptors.

  13. AIS:  PAIN • Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is  typically NOT painful • If a scoliosis patient has more than mild  back discomfort, a thorough evaluation  is warranted. – In one study , 23% of pts (560/2442) with  presumed AIS presented with back pain at  time of diagnosis.  9% of this cohort (48/560)  were found to have an underlying associated  condition such as spondylolisthesis,  syringomyelia, tethered cord, disc herniation  or tumor. » Ramirez et al. JBJS 1997 » The prevalence of back pain in children who have idiopathic  scoliosis

  14. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • Clinical evaluation 

  15. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis CLINICAL EVALUATION – ADAM’S  forward bend  test – “Inclinometer/level” can  be helpful • Tool or app • Measures the angle  of trunk rotation – XRAYS appropriate for  curves measuring 7  degrees or more with  level/inclinometer or in  setting of curve that is  progressing

  16. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • Clinical Evaluation – Presentation of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: the  Bigger the Kid, the Bigger the Curve   » Goodbody et al JPO 2017 – 150 pts, 50 each normal wt, overweight and obese – Average curve at presentation • Nl wt: 18.1 degrees, over wt: 23.9 degrees, obese: 24.5 degrees. – Overweight and obese patients with AIS present at significantly larger  curve magnitudes and significantly higher degrees of skeletal maturity.  – More over, these patients were significantly more likely to present with  very large curves and all patients presenting with surgical range curve  were either overweight or obese – CONSIDER OBTAINING XRAYS WHEN INCLINOMETER READING 5  DEGREES IN OVERWEIGHT PATIENTS

  17. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis • • Position Statement on Screening for AIS US Prevention Services Taskforce in 2004 concluded that  the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance  of benefits and harms of screening for children and  adolescents aged 10‐18 AAOS, POSNA, SRS, and AAP believe that recent high  quality studies demonstrate that non operative  interventions such as bracing and scoliosis specific  exercises can decrease the likelihood of curve  progression to the point of requiring surgical treatment  and thus have generated following best screening  recommendation • – FEMALES should be screened TWICE, once at age 10  and again at 12. – MALES should be screened ONCE, at age 13 or 14.

  18. AIS: Xray Evaluation • RADIOLOGIC EVALUATION – PA/lateral scoliosis xrays – EOS low dose xrays • 50‐80% less radiation compared to traditional  xrays • Only available on one machine at  Laurelhurst campus  SCH. • Need baseline routine xrays to look for  fine detail • Referral to orthopedics  • Curves 15‐20 degrees or more in  individuals less than 12 years old  • Greater than or equal to 30  degrees any age.

  19. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION – BACK PAIN – CURVE PROGESSION – QUALITY OF LIFE • Mortality • 2X mortality rate • 60‐80% patients died of cardiopulmonary disease – Nachemson, 1968 – Nilsonne, 1968 – Ascani, 1986 • MORTALITY FOR PATIENTS WITH ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS IS EQUAL TO THE  GENERAL POPULATION – Peterson, 1992 – Weinstein, 2003

  20. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY : equal to the general population – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION – BACK PAIN – CURVE PROGESSION – QUALITY OF LIFE • Cardiopulmonary Function – The larger the curve,  the less lung volume and chest wall compliance – Patients with curves > 50 degrees have reduced vital capacity and  more shortness of breath, but no apparent increase in respiratory  disability                Weinstein JAMA 2003 – Cardiopulmonary death risk may be increased in patients with thoracic curves  >100 degrees            Ponseti JBJS 1950 – SEVERE CARDIOPULMONARY COMPROMISE IS EXCEEDINGLY RARE IN AIS

  21. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY:  equal to the general population – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION:  no apparent increase in respiratory disability – BACK PAIN – CURVE PROGESSION – QUALITY OF LIFE • • Back Pain in AIS 40‐90 % prevalence of back pain with variable severity  • Nachemson 1968, Nilsonne 1968, Edgar 1987 • • • 61 % of scoliosis patients vs 35% of (adult) controls with reported back pain Pain was similar in frequency, intensity and duration when compared to controls Radiographic arthritis did not correlate with back pain  • Weinstein, JAMA 2004 AIS patients will likely have more back pain but no greater disability from back pain. •

  22. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY : equal to the general population – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION:  no apparent increase in respiratory disability – BACK PAIN: 2x normal, mild – CURVE PROGESSION – QUALITY OF LIFE • Curve Progression • Before skeletal maturity  – Gender female > male – Curve magnitude – Remaining skeletal growth : Risser sign, menarchal status, bone age/Sanders, triradiate status • After skeletal maturity – Curves less than 30 degrees do not progress – Curves > 50 degrees in thoracic spine will progress 1 degree/year – Curves >40 degrees in the lumbar spine with progress 1 degree/year

  23. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY : equal to the general population – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION:  no apparent increase in respiratory disability – BACK PAIN: 2x normal, mild – CURVE PROGESSION: 1 degree/year – QUALITY OF LIFE • QUALITY OF LIFE  as adult – Most studies show equal marriage rate  at 82‐98% – Scoliosis patients equivalent to controls in DEPRESSION INDEX – Older patients with untreated AIS are much less satisfied than controls with body image – 1/3 feel that curvature has restricted them in some way ( purchasing clothes, physical ability,  self consciousness – Some think they are less healthy and restricted in physical and social activities with “real  psychological disturbances”  – Edgar 1987, Weinstein 2003, Mayo SPINE 1994, Ascani SPINE 1986

  24. AIS: Natural History • Natural History of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis – MORTALITY : equal to the general population – CARDIOPULMONARY FUNCTION:  no apparent increase in  respiratory disability – BACK PAIN: 2x normal, mild – CURVE PROGESSION: 1 degree/year – QUALITY OF LIFE:  “cosmetic”  concerns

  25. AIS:  Treatment • TREATMENT:  classic teaching • Curves 30 degrees or less :  OBSERVATION • Curves 30 degrees‐ (45) 50  degrees:  BRACE • Curves > 50 degrees in skeletally  immature or > 60 degrees in the  skeletally mature:  SURGICAL  STABILIZATION

  26. AIS Treatment:  BRACING

  27. AIS Treatment: BRACING

  28. AIS Treatment: BRACING • Bracing has been shown to slow or  prevent the progression of spinal  deformity during growth – A brace WILL NOT produce lasting  correction  – Prevention of curve progression in the  growing individual may prevent need for  surgery • Bracing does not make the curve go away

  29. AIS Treatment:  BRACING • Who needs to be braced? • SRS Bracing Criteria – Scoliosis curves greater than 30 degrees – OR greater than 25 degrees with history  of documented progression • Patients must have growth remaining – Within 1 year of menarche – Risser 2 or less

  30. AIS Treatment: BRACING • Once initiated, bracing is worn  until skeletal maturity • 18‐24 months post menarchal,   Risser IV and no change in height for  6 months. • Brace wear is often 12‐36 months

  31. AIS Treatment: Bracing  • • New data supporting efficacy of bracing BrAIST study    NEJM 2013 – Treatment success as defined by  preventing curve progression to surgical  range/ 50 degree curve • 72% success with bracing         • 48 %  in non braced group – Positive association between hours of  brace wear and rate of treatment success. – Of those patients who were treatment  successes, 13 hours of brace wear/day  resulted in 90‐93% success. – 0‐6 hr/day: no benefit/same as  observation – Number needed to treat 3

  32. AIS Treatment: BRACING • Compliance is challenging – On average, patients wore braces 65% of prescribed  amount of time – Only 15% of patients demonstrated a highly compliant  (>90%) brace wear routine. • Patients on parttime ( 16 hr/day) regimen actually demonstrated worse  compliance (58%) compared to those prescribed full time wear (71%)    DiRaimond et al JPO 1988 • Bracing is not effective for everyone – Less effective for older patients, males, heavier  patients 

  33. AIS: Treatment • Brace Treatment Summary – Brace TLSO is an effective treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis – Bracing can only slow or prevent progression – Brace candidates • Must have growth remaining • Curves between 20‐45 degrees – Wear schedule matters • 13 or more hours/day is most effective – Brace is better than observation along in preventing progression and  avoid surgery – 3D bracing showing promise; more study needed.

  34. AIS: Treatment • Physiotherapeutic Scoliosis  Specific Exercises • Schroth PT  • SEAS: Scientific Exercise Approach to Scoliosis – Alignment training process – Develop deep postural muscles to improve  scoliotic alignment – Addresses all 3 dimensions of the POSTURAL (flexible) component of the structural scoliosis • Ideally to prevent or slow progression of AIS  – Prior to bracing to potentially avoid need for brace • Small curve 20‐25 degrees in skeletally immature < Sanders 6 – With bracing to improve compliance with bracing and  maintain core strength during bracing

  35. AIS: Treatment • Physiotherapeutic Scoliosis  Specific Exercises • Effectiveness of Schroth exercises during bracing in  adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: results from preliminary  study        Kwan et al  Scoliosis and Spine Disorders, 2017 – Compared bracing alone vs brace + PSSE – Rates of progression were > 2x higher in the brace alone  group – 50% progression vs 21% progression with added PSSE • Schroth compliance study  Vitale et al 2017 – 85 patients – Compliance with home exercise program  =  > 80 min/week after >10 hrs of  training – Non compliant patients had more curve progression

  36. AIS: Treatment • Physiotherapeutic Scoliosis Specific Exercises – Recent systematic reviews are split on recommendations for PSSE – Few studies – Most studies are small, often fewer than 50 pts – Barriers  • Access: not many trained providers • Cost:  – not covered by all insurance plans – Requires purchase of equipment and room to install it • Compliance: needs right patient and family

  37. AIS: Treatment • Vitamin D and calcium in AIS – Does Vit D and Ca+ supplementation affect curves in AIS?  » Lam et al, 2018 – Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study over 2 years – AIS patients 11‐14yrs Tanner <IV – Femoral neck bone mineral density Z scores <0 – Cobb angles > 15 degrees – Study design split all eligible girls with AIS into 3 groups • Group 1: Placebo     • Group 2  low dose  400 IU Vitamin D and 600 mg Ca • Group 3 High dose 800 IU Vitamin D and 600 mg Ca – The lowest rate of curve progression was seen in the high dose group • Group 1  46.7% curve progression • Group 2  24.4.% curve progression • Group 3 21.7% curve progression.

  38. AIS Treatment: Surgery • Posterior Spinal Fusion : gold standard • Indications: – large, progressive curves » > 40‐ 45 degrees in  growing individuals » > 50‐60 degrees in  skeletally mature patients • Goals – Prevent long term progression  in adulthood – Achieve maximum deformity  correction – Maintain optimal coronal and  sagittal balance

  39. AIS: Treatment • Outcome measures • Orthopedist – Spinal alignment – Xray measurements • Patient – Asymmetries of  shoulders, ribs, flank and  breasts

  40. AIS: Treatment •Long term outcome of Surgery for AIS •Long Term Clinical Outcomes of Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic  Scoliosis 21 to 41 Years Later •Akazawa et al, SPINE 2012 •256 patients treated surgically between 1968 and 1988 •Control group 130 healthy volunteers; no scoliosis, no spine surgery •Based on SRS 22 responses, when compared to control group •AIS patients had significantly decreased FUNCTION •AIS patients had decreased SELF IMAGE ( AIS 3.0 +/‐ 0.8, CTR 3.7 +/‐0.5, P< 0.01) •Both groups were similar with respect to PAIN ( AIS 4.3 +/‐ 0.6, CTR 4.2 +/‐ 0.5, P =0.14) •Both groups were similar with respect to MENTAL HEALTH ( AIS 3.9 +/‐ 0.9, CTR 3.7 +/‐ 0.7,  P=0.14) (AIS 4.3 +/‐ 0.6, CTR 4.7 +/‐ 0.5, P < 0.01) •Mean follow up was 31.5 years.  generation implants •Although scores for function and self image were significantly lower in AIS patients, the clinical  significance of these differences is unknown •Better post operative outcomes expected with 3 dimensional “modern” constructs used today.

  41. AIS: Treatment • Spinal Fusion – Complications • Neurologic injury 1:1000 • Pseudarthrosis  1‐2% • Infection 1‐2% • Flat back syndrome • Crankshaft  • SMA syndrome – Residual asymmetry of flank, breast,  torso, shoulders

  42. AIS: Treatment • Future of AIS Treatment – Fusionless procedures • Guided growth vertebral  body stapling • Anterior tethering – These methods control the patients  remaining spinal  growth to achieve  curve correction. – Avoid the morbidity associated with  spinal fusion.

  43. AIS: Treatment • Operative vs Non operative outcomes – SRS‐22r Scores in Nonoperated Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis  Patients With Curves Greater Than Forty Degrees » Ward et al SPINE 2017 • 190 patients , >18 yrs of age, with curves > 40 degrees who elected to forgo surgery • 166 patients who underwent surgery • No statistically significant differences were found between group on the PAIN,  FUNCTION, or MENTAL HEALTH domains of the SRS 22r.  Differences in favor of the  operative cohort were found for SELF IMAGE, SATISFACTION and TOTAL SCORE. Conclusion • No meaningful clinically significant differences in SRS 22r scores at an average of 8  year follow up.  • These data in conjunction with an absence of long term evidence of serious medical  consequences with non surgical management of curve >40 degrees should  encourage surgeons to reevaluate the benefits of routine surgical care.

  44. AIS Summary • AIS is a 3 dimensional deformity of the spine • Most patients with small curves will never require active  treatment • Young, skeletally immature girls are most as risk for curve  progression, and they require close monitoring. • Scoliosis screening recommendations – FEMALES should be screened TWICE, once at age 10 and again at 12. – MALES should be screened ONCE, at age 13 or 14. – Xrays should be obtained for scoliometer measurements of 7 degrees or greater. ( 5  degrees or greater in the obese patient) – Referral to orthopedics for curves 15‐20 degrees in patients 12 years or less – Referral to orthopedics for patients of any age with curves greater than 30 degrees.

  45. AIS Summary • Bracing is an effective in preventing curve progression and it’s  effect is dose dependent • Scoliosis specific physical therapy exercises can improve the  flexible component of scoliosis. There is evidence that they  may reduce the rate of progression and augment the  effectiveness of bracing. • Surgical fusion is an option for those curve that become  severe. Posterior spinal fusion is the current gold standard. • In the future, treatment may allow scoliosis correction  without fusion and its associated morbidity

  46. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION