Proclamation 2021 - PDF Document

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  1. Proclamation 2021 Breakouts to the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines (TPG) (IV) Emergent Literacy—Writing Domain Proclamation 2021 Breakouts to the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines (TPG) Course For the full text of the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines, visit https://tea.texas.gov/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=25769825386. Prekindergarten (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN Prekindergarten children generate hypotheses about how written language works and begin to explore the uses of writing for themselves. Initially, they may ask adults to write their names, signs, and letters for them. Children will later independently imitate adults by writing their own thoughts and ideas. This “pretend writing” is the beginning stage of writing development. Through these early writing experiences, young children will develop initial understandings about the forms, features, and functions of written language. Over time, children’s writing attempts more closely approximate conventional writing. In Prekindergarten classrooms, teachers serve as models and guides, writing for different purposes for and with children. Thus, children learn to write through many experiences. Fine motor skills may impact children’s ability to write legibly; however, this should not limit their opportunities to write for meaning. The child’s level of fine motor development should determine the tools and the size of the surfaces that are provided for writing experiences. Fine motor skills can be developed alongside writing and through writing as children progress through the developmental stages. Domain Skill Outcome Breakout (A) Motivation to Write Skills. As children watch adults write for many purposes, they develop the understanding that print conveys meaning. Initially, children engage in drawing or scribbling as a way to communicate. These are the earliest stages of writing. Young children sketch lines and scribble “notes” in an attempt to imitate adults’ writing behaviors and begin to make connections between print and spoken words. With this understanding of the function and meaning of print comes the motivation to use print in the same manner. All efforts to convey meaning in the form of scribbles, letter-like forms, or strings of letters should be celebrated. Children also engage in using print to convey their meanings in different situations and for different purposes. As children interact with each other in play, they make lists, take orders, label, and leave notes to convey what has occurred during their play. Children may also begin to write personal stories and/or write based on “mentor” texts (texts that can be used as a model for writing) read aloud. (1) Child intentionally uses marks, letters, or symbols to record language and verbally shares meaning (a) Child intentionally uses marks, letters, or symbols to record language (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (1) Child intentionally uses marks, letters, or symbols to record language and verbally shares meaning (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (A) Motivation to Write Skills (b) Child verbally shares meaning (2) Child independently writes to communicate his/her ideas for a variety of purposes (a) Child independently writes to communicate his/her ideas for a variety of purposes (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (A) Motivation to Write Skills 1 of 3

  2. Proclamation 2021 Breakouts to the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines (TPG) (IV) Emergent Literacy—Writing Domain Domain Skill Outcome Breakout (B) Writing as a Process. As young children understand that marks convey meaning (what they think, they can say; and what they say, they can write), it is important to model that writing is not simply about a product. Writing is a thought process that moves from thinking of an idea to a well-developed idea or piece of writing, in which the young author is proud to share. Interacting with children to compose a piece of writing over a series of days using modeled, shared and/or interactive writing exposes children to this process of prewriting/brainstorming, writing/drafting, revising (what the writing sounds like), editing (what the writing looks like), and publishing/sharing in a way that Prekindergarten children understand. Children’s ability to engage in each of the stages of the writing process develops over time. During these sessions, the teacher negotiates the language and the process with the children and does most or all of the recording/writing depending on the length of the piece. Taking a piece of writing from the thought stage to the sharing stage also motivates children to write more and helps them see and understand the power of using print to convey meaning. (1) Child discusses and contributes ideas for drafts composed in whole/small group writing activities (a) Child discusses ideas for drafts composed in whole/small group writing activities (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (1) Child discusses and contributes ideas for drafts composed in whole/small group writing activities (b) Child contributes ideas for drafts composed in whole/small group writing activities (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (a) Child interacts to revise (add [to]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (b) Child interacts to revise (take out [of]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (c) Child interacts to revise (change order [in]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (d) Child interacts to edit (conventions) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (e) Child provides suggestions to revise (add [to]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process 2 of 3

  3. Proclamation 2021 Breakouts to the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines (TPG) (IV) Emergent Literacy—Writing Domain Domain Skill Outcome (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (2) Child interacts and provides suggestions to revise (add, take out, change order) and edit (conventions) class-made drafts (3) Child shares and celebrates class-made and individual written products (3) Child shares and celebrates class-made and individual written products (3) Child shares and celebrates class-made and individual written products (3) Child shares and celebrates class-made and individual written products Breakout (f) Child provides suggestions to revise (take out [of]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (g) Child provides suggestions to revise (change order [in]) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (h) Child provides suggestions to edit (conventions) class-made drafts (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (a) Child shares class-made written products (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (b) Child shares individual written products (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (c) Child celebrates class-made written products (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (B) Writing as a Process (d) Child celebrates individual written products. (C) Conventions in Writing. Just as children learn to talk by talking, children learn concepts about print through interacting with print. To children, it may appear that writing is simply talk that has been written down. However, there are rules that apply to writing that do not apply to speaking. These specific rules that govern how to record thoughts in writing must be learned so children can become more proficient at conveying their thoughts and actions. A shared and/or interactive writing process can help children better understand this as outlined in Section B. (1) Child writes own name (first name or frequent nickname) using legible letters in proper sequence (a) Child writes own name (first name or frequent nickname) using legible letters in proper sequence (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (2) Child moves from scribbles to some letter-sound correspondence using beginning and ending sounds when writing (2) Child moves from scribbles to some letter-sound correspondence using beginning and ending sounds when writing (3) Child independently uses letters to make words or parts of words (4) Child uses appropriate directionality when writing (top to bottom, left to right) (4) Child uses appropriate directionality when writing (top to bottom, left to right) (5) Child begins to experiment with punctuation when writing (a) Child moves from scribbles to some letter-sound correspondence using beginning sounds when writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing (b) Child moves from scribbles to some letter-sound correspondence using ending sounds when writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing (a) Child independently uses letters to make words or parts of words (a) Child uses appropriate directionality when writing (top to bottom) (b) Child uses appropriate directionality when writing (left to right) (a) Child begins to experiment with punctuation when writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing (IV) EMERGENT LITERACY—WRITING DOMAIN (C) Conventions in Writing 3 of 3