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  1. Spokane Valley Heritage Museum a picnic lunch. viewers. Marilyn Omlor, Zookeeper; and wonderful and unmatched setting to enjoy them and Leanne Brady, Lead Zookeeper/Interim Curator; the local schools. It also provided a Photos and information courtesy of: fun for zoo was a fun and educational field trip for hours of Group tours were always welcome, and the provided cunning ways with zookeepers. which this because of his clever and the Petting Zoo. own pond, “Nasty” the bobcat?...nicknamed too, especially at appeared in media. They too had their And who can forget “Bob” aka warmest friends “Rosie,” two Alaskan brown bears who animals their The zoo was also home to “Roscoe” and even able to get a paw print as a keepsake. could make appearance here for a while. Zookeepers were experiences and Leopard made an enjoyed new perform their entertaining antics enjoyed by the “Sasha” the Snow memories. Visitors “Wally” and “Nikki” create lifelong Lion lived here too. forget watching new opportunities to African Golden-Maned for visitors. Who could Every day provided Lions. “Leonard”, an provided a great show all African Black-Maned Otter Pond always settings. “Naushka”, and Tawni”, Feeding time at the one of nature’s most impressive zoological home of “Dusty”, could walk, talk, and be with the animals in the park. and you’ll find the former compound where you and your family featured throughout rocks south of the YMCA, Northwest. It was a forested zoo home. Up to 200 animals with 55 species were Locate the group of large visitor attraction in the Pacific continents called the Walk in the Wild their W alk in the Wild Zoo was a unique America. However, animals representing five “Chip” were very popular with the visitors. display of animals found in North and South setting. The female “Dandi Lion” and male The zoo’s mission statement stressed the known as cougars, were featured in a natural Several North American mountain lions, also the nature trails. wonderland of exciting events, animals, and your imagination. too far away. brought cross country skiing to a Winter what it was like, with our simple map and friend, “Kasey,” was never the animals prepared for winter. Snow still can. Step back in time and envision gentle tiger, “Lilly.” Her featured educational classes and programs as Mirabeau Point Park area anymore, but you wanted to see was the concerts and special themed events. Fall The animals may not be roaming the well-known animals people births. Summer offered outdoor musical Certainly one of the more to the Walk in the Wild Zoo? H Springtime brought flowers and animal ave you ever wondered what happened Cats of the World As the seasons changed, so did the zoo. in the Wild Zoo ~ Formerly at Mirabeau Point Park Zoo History Walkin the DO YOU REMEMBER THE ZOO? In 1965, the Inland Empire Zoological Society organized as a private non-profit corporation. Their goal was to establish a zoo in the Inland Empire area to be operated for the benefit of the public. In 1972, Inland Empire Paper Company, owned by the Cowles family, made available to the community and to the Society 240 acres of rugged, beautiful, unique landscape to build a zoo. A portion of that land is now Mirabeau Point Park. The zoo opened to the public in early summer of 1974, and received 15,000 visitors that year. It was free of charge at first, with a suggested admission donation of purchasing a $1 Vanishing Species Medallion. Annual attendance peaked in the early 1990’s with 100,000 visitors. The zoo was a non-profit entity, funded by admissions, a gift shop, yearly dues of almost 1200 members, grants, and donations. These generous donations included: materials; labor; and even meats, vegetables, and fruits from grocers, as the diets of the animals called for 450 pounds of meat per week. There was an Adopt-an-Animal Program, in which the donor received a certificate while the zoo cared for the animal. Citizens could also “own a piece of the zoo” and purchased ceramic tile pavers. Unfortunately, the zoo experienced financial woes and issues such as winters being especially tough with big bills for hay and other feed. The zoo closed December 31, 1995, and the animals went to other zoos or private owners.

  2. to other zoos or private owners. closed December 31, 1995, and the animals went with big bills for hay and other feed. The zoo and issues such as winters being especially tough Unfortunately, the zoo experienced financial woes tile pavers. “own a piece of the zoo” and purchased ceramic zoo cared for the animal. Citizens could also which the donor received a certificate while the There was an Adopt-an-Animal Program, in pounds of meat per week. grocers, as the diets of the animals called for 450 and even meats, vegetables, and fruits from generous donations included: materials; labor; 1200 members, grants, and donations. These admissions, a gift shop, yearly dues of almost The zoo was a non-profit entity, funded by the early 1990’s with 100,000 visitors. Species Medallion. Annual attendance peaked in admission donation of purchasing a $1 Vanishing was free of charge at first, with a suggested 1974, and received 15,000 visitors that year. It The zoo opened to the public in early summer of Point Park. zoo. A portion of that land is now Mirabeau rugged, beautiful, unique landscape to build a community and to the Society 240 acres of by the Cowles family, made available to the In 1972, Inland Empire Paper Company, owned public. Empire area to be operated for the benefit of the Their goal was to establish a zoo in the Inland organized as a private non-profit corporation. In 1965, the Inland Empire Zoological Society THE ZOO? Zoo History DO YOU REMEMBER Walkin the in the Wild Zoo ~ Formerly at Mirabeau Point Park H As the seasons changed, so did the zoo. Springtime brought flowers and animal births. Summer offered outdoor musical concerts and special themed events. Fall featured educational classes and programs as the animals prepared for winter. Snow brought cross country skiing to a Winter wonderland of exciting events, animals, and the nature trails. The zoo’s mission statement stressed the display of animals found in North and South America. However, animals representing five continents called the Walk in the Wild their home. Up to 200 animals with 55 species were featured throughout the park. Feeding time at the Otter Pond always provided a great show for visitors. Who could forget watching “Wally” and “Nikki” perform their entertaining antics enjoyed by the ave you ever wondered what happened to the Walk in the Wild Zoo? Cats of the World Certainly one of the more well-known animals people wanted to see was the gentle tiger, “Lilly.” Her friend, “Kasey,” was never too far away. The animals may not be roaming the Mirabeau Point Park area anymore, but you still can. Step back in time and envision what it was like, with our simple map and your imagination. Several North American mountain lions, also known as cougars, were featured in a natural setting. The female “Dandi Lion” and male “Chip” were very popular with the visitors. Locate the group of large rocks south of the YMCA, and you’ll find the former home of “Dusty”, “Naushka”, and Tawni”, all African Black-Maned Lions. “Leonard”, an African Golden-Maned Lion lived here too. “Sasha” the Snow Leopard made an appearance here for a while. Zookeepers were even able to get a paw print as a keepsake. And who can forget “Bob” aka “Nasty” the bobcat?...nicknamed this because of his clever and cunning ways with zookeepers. alk in the Wild Zoo was a unique visitor attraction in the Pacific Northwest. It was a forested zoo compound where you and your family could walk, talk, and be with the animals in one of nature’s most impressive zoological settings. Every day provided new opportunities to create lifelong memories. Visitors enjoyed new experiences and could make animals their warmest friends too, especially at the Petting Zoo. Group tours were always welcome, and the zoo was a fun and educational field trip for the local schools. It also provided a wonderful and unmatched setting to enjoy a picnic lunch. W The zoo was also home to “Roscoe” and “Rosie,” two Alaskan brown bears who appeared in media. They too had their own pond, which provided hours of fun for them and viewers. Photos and information courtesy of: Leanne Brady, Lead Zookeeper/Interim Curator; Marilyn Omlor, Zookeeper; and Spokane Valley Heritage Museum

  3. Where Were the Animals Located? See Below for Approximate Areas ?????????? ??? ?????????????? ??? ????????????????????? Key Animal Locations ??????? ??????? Zoo Structures/Bldgs ??????? ????????? Current Structures/Bldgs ??????????????????????????????????????????? Walking Trail Former Road ???????????????????????? ??? ???????????????? ???????????????????????? ????????????? ??????? ????? ?????????????? ????????????????????????????? ??????? ??? ???????????? ????????????????????????????? ?????? ???????????? ??????? ??? ?????? ?????? ??? ??????? ????????????? ?????????????????? ???????????????????? ?????????? ??????? ??????? ????????? ??????? ??????????????????? ???????????????????? ??????? ??? ?????? ????????? ???? ?????????? ????????????? ??? ???????? ??? ????? ??? ????????? ?????? ?????? ??? ??? ??????? ??? ?????? ??? ????????? ??? ????? ?????? ?????? ??????? ???????? ??? ??????? ?????? ?????? ????? ????????????????????? ??? ?????? ??????? ????????????? ???????? ??????????? ???????? ???????????? ??????? ???? ??????? ????? ???????? ????? ??? ??????? ????? ??? ???? ???????? ??????? ???????? ??????? ??? ????????? ??????? ??????????????? ???????