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Week 01 - Presentation

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  1. Week 01 - Introduction

  2. Class Agenda Attendance Introductory Lecture SKETCHUP Demonstration BAUHAUS video

  3. Visual Studies as “Foundation”

  4. Historical Background of “Foundation” Bauhaus School Germany. Chicago School of Design. Paul Klee. Pedagogical Sketchbook. 1925 Wassily Kandinsky. Point and Line to Plane. 1926 Gyorgy Kepes. Language of Vision. 1944 Numerous textbooks have appeared since World War II which describe the "language" of design as a "vocabulary" of elements (point, line, plane, color, texture) arranged according to a "grammar" of formal contrasts (dark/light, static/dynamic, positive/negative).

  5. What the foundation year is about. Foundation year is (should be) about exploration. Students are exposed to different media , techniques, ideas. According to Bauhaus instructors, students have different sensibilities. Some are attuned to rhythm, some to material, some to contour, some to color. Combinations, of course. Additionally, an analogy can be made to teaching music. Music instruction starts out with teaching of scales. Exercises to be exposed to, learn, and understand the fundamentals first. Bauhaus educational system, is in some ways a reference point. (difference from old Beaux-Arts methods of instruction). Identify the strengths, and the weaknesses. Learn to give and receive criticism.

  6. Difference between wvc and architecture school Trying to provide a similar experience. Perhaps wvc is more introductory level. Wvc does not have a 24 hour studio , as do most U.S. architecture schools. Students learn a lot from each other. (critiques , techniques )

  7. Design Education The basics are the same. Some architectural schools are more “real world” nuts and bolts, some are more abstract. This course will combine both elements. Both attitudes and viewpoints are necessary and valid.

  8. Instructor Education Background University of Michigan . B.S. Arch Architectural Association 1 year in Diploma School Cooper Union B.Arch 3 different approaches. Licensed and Practicing Architect.

  9. What is Architecture (from Ching Introduction) • Architectural Systems • 1. The Architecture of Space , Structure , Enclosure • 2. Experienced through Movement in Space-Time • 3. Achieved by means of Technology • 4. Accommodating a Program • In relationship with its Context • This class will touch on all 5 of these main points.

  10. What is Architecture (from Ching Introduction) • Architectural Orders • PHYSICAL - Form and Space • Solids and voids • Interior and Exterior • PERCEPTUAL - Sensory perception and recognition of the physical elements by experiencing them sequentially in time. • CONCEPTUAL - Comprehension of the ordered or disordered relationships among a building’s elements and systems, and responding to the meanings they evoke. • A project can have a CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE , just as it can have a physical structure.

  11. 3 Tracks to Class • Reading Form Space and Order. Ching. Lecture and Discussion in class. • Projects - Architectural. Consisting of Program , Parameters, requiring a “rationale” or “concept” and graphical solution. • Exercises - Visual Studies. 2d and 3d Composition. Abstract.

  12. Goals of Class • Experience the “Design Process”. Design = Process + Product • Craftsmanship skills. Quality “Products” • Learn to communicate design ideas graphically, in written form, verbally. Present ideas and products in class. • Explore various 2d and 3d media. Drawing, Ink, Color, model building. • Conversant in vocabulary of architectural design. Ability to formulate and communicate a “rationale”. • Develop a sensibility of Composition in your work. • Begin to develop ability to engage architectural ideas conceptually.

  13. Reading. Form Space and Order. Francis D.K. Ching • Primary Elements • Form • Form and Space • Organization • Circulation • Proportion and Scale • Principles

  14. Materials for studio work Parallel Rule and Board (recommended, not required). Illustration Board 15” x 20” . (a few sheets) Architects’ Scale Ink Pens (Technical Pens recommended) Tracing Paper. 18” roll and 12” roll Acrylic Paints (red, blue, yellow, white, black) ; Assorted Brushes #1 X-Acto Knife Rubber Cement Cutting Mat Board Metal Straight Edge Flexible Curve Technical Compass (ideally with beam extension and inking attachment). Sketch Pad Drafting Tape Other items per syllabus.

  15. Art Stores • West Valley College Bookstore has some items. • University Arts. San Jose and Palo Alto. • Pearl Paint. San Francisco. Market Street 6th • Michael’s Arts and Crafts • Arch. San Francisco

  16. Parallel Rule 16” x 20” 18” x 24” Price around $50 Much better than T Square 24” x 30” $125

  17. Tracing Paper 12” ok for now. Comes in yellow and white color.

  18. Triangles

  19. Illustration Board Crescent No. 1 Cold Press 15” x 20”

  20. Inking Pens 005, 01, 02, 03, 05, 08 widths.

  21. Kneaded Eraser

  22. Electric Eraser (not required but nice!)

  23. Architects Scale Triangular 1/8” and ¼” $10 or so

  24. Bow Compass with Extension Should get 6” compass With 6” minimum beam extension. Around $30 - $40 Not required, but very useful in drawing larger diameter circles.

  25. Universal Compass Adapter Used to attach technical pens and x-acto knives to compass. Around $5 to 9

  26. Flexible Curve

  27. Technical Pens Rapidograph Or Mars Staedtler Set of 4 is adequate; Can start out using disposable graphic pens (sakura or similar) less expensive

  28. Inking Rule + Metal Straight Edge

  29. Chipboard

  30. Chipboard

  31. Wood Dowels

  32. Balsa Wood

  33. Glue Gun

  34. Non-Utilitarian Object Fur lined coffee cup. Meret Oppenheim

  35. Non-Utilitarian Object Optical Illusion a la M.C.Escher

  36. Non-Utilitarian Object Rube Goldberg Machine - crazy process

  37. Non-Utilitarian Object She sits down to eat in scale (A) - As weight increases, magnet (B) moves toward small steel bar (C), picking it up and tilting groove (D) - Golf ball (E) drops in ant-hill (F) - Beginner golfer (G) takes swing at ball, misses it and knocks chunk out of ant-hill, scattering ants - Anteater (H) goes after ants, moving table away from hungry lady, allowing her to preserve her beautiful figure. Rube Goldberg Machine - dieting device

  38. Non-Utilitarian Object Rube Goldberg

  39. Non-Utilitarian Object Japanese Gadgets

  40. Non-Utilitarian Object Japanese Gadgets

  41. What is Architecture (from Ching Introduction) • Architectural Orders • PHYSICAL - Form and Space • Solids and voids • Interior and Exterior • PERCEPTUAL - Sensory perception and recognition of the physical elements by experiencing them sequentially in time. • CONCEPTUAL - Comprehension of the ordered or disordered relationships among a building’s elements and systems, and responding to the meanings they evoke. • A project can have a CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE , just as it can have a physical structure.

  42. Architectural Issues Outline • (Design) Process • Object / Form • Space / Form • Use (Function) • Site (Place) • Detail / Construction • Cultural / Meaning / Aesthetics • (Design) Concept • ---------------------------------------------------- • Cost • Implementation • Professional Practice

  43. Architectural Issues • The previous issues should be referenced in analyzing existing works ofa architecture and also in conceptualizing and critiquing your own work. • Different projects put a higher priority on different aspects. • A key question is: What is the design concept? What is the project about? • This class is about DRAWING, but perhaps it is even more about THINKING.

  44. End of Powerpoint Lecture.

  45. Architectural Form

  46. Architectonic Form Interrelation of Volumes Georges Vantongerloo

  47. 1.0 Reading. Form Space and Order. Francis D.K. Ching • Primary Elements • Form • Form and Space • Organization • Circulation • Proportion and Scale • Principles

  48. Primary Elements From Point to Line to Plane to Volume.

  49. Point

  50. Line in Architecture Form Space and Order. Ching