Part 6 Logos/Images/Pictograms - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Part 6 Logos/Images/Pictograms

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  1. Chapter 6Logos/Symbols/Pictograms

  2. Objectives (1 of 3) • Learn the definition of a logo and the types of logos. • Realize the logo as keystone of a visual identity. • Address the spirit of the brand, group, or social cause. • Design logos with relevance to an audience in mind. • Choose fonts appropriately and creatively. • Understand the use of a logo in letterhead and stationery applications.

  3. Objectives (2 of 3) • Become acquainted with practical considerations of logo application. • Learn historical periods and connotative meaning as applied to choosing fonts for logo design. • Become familiar with fundamental ways of depicting logos. • Develop a logo design concept with major considerations in mind. • Study the definition and potential meaning of a symbol.

  4. Objectives (3 of 3) • Recognize the various possible configurations of a symbol. • Grasp how professionals utilize design nomenclature. • Learn the definition and purpose of a pictogram and pictogram system. • Communicate meaning through logo, symbol, and pictogram design. • Convey information through pictograms. • Design an elemental visual. • Skillfully combine type and visuals into a coherent unit. • Design logos, symbols, and pictograms.

  5. Definition of Logo • A logo is a unique identifying symbol. • A logo also is called a brandmark, mark, identifier, logotype, or trademark.

  6. Types of Logos (1 of 6) • Logos can take the form of a wordmark. • Wordmark (also called logotype) is the name spelled out in unique typography or lettering. Logo Designer: Martin Holloway

  7. Types of Logos (2 of 6) • Logos can take the form of a lettermark. • The logo is created using the initials of the brand name. Logo Design firm: Bernhardt Fudyma Design Group

  8. Types of Logos (3 of 6) • Logos can take the form of a symbol mark -- an abstract or non-representational visual or a pictorial visual. • An abstract symbol mark is a representational visual with an emphasis on the intrinsic form, an extraction relating to a real object modified with an abstract emphasis. Logo Design firm: Red Flannel

  9. Types of Logos (4 of 6) • A non-representational or non-objective symbol mark is a visual which is a non-pictorial visual that symbolizes the brand or social cause, one that does not relate to a person, place, activity, or an identifiable object. Logo Design firm: Segura Inc.

  10. Types of Logos (5 of 6) • A pictorial symbol mark is a representational image that symbolizes the brand or social cause; it relates to an identifiable person, place, activity, or object. Logo Design agency: Kessels Kramer

  11. Types of Logos (6 of 6) • Combination mark • A combination of words and symbols Logo Design firm: Liska + Associates Inc.

  12. Logo and Visual Identity • A logo plays a key role in the visual identity of a brand, social organization, or company. • A visual identity is the visual and verbal articulation of a brand or organization including all pertinent design applications, such as, letterhead, business card, and packaging, among many other possible applications. Visual Identity Design firm: Ideograma

  13. Identity Standards Manual • Sets up guidelines for how the logo is to be applied to numerous applications, from business cards to point-of-purchase materials to vehicles to web sites

  14. Applications for a Logo • A logo should work for all necessary applications. • Packaging • Stationery (letterhead, business card, envelope) • Signage • Advertisements • Clothing • Posters • Shopping bags • Menus • Forms • Covers

  15. Stationery • A staple of any visual identity is stationery/letterhead. • Most designers position information at the head, or top, of the page, which is why we call it letterhead. Stationery Designer: Tommy Ratliff

  16. Practical Considerations for Stationery Design (1 of 3) • The weight of the paper is very important because the letterhead and envelope must stand up to typewriters, computer printers, pens, and markers. • Letterhead must be sturdy enough to withstand being folded. • A business card is usually inserted into one’s wallet and therefore must be a heavier weight paper than the letterhead.

  17. Practical Considerations for Stationery Design (2 of 3) • When choosing paper, think also about: • Texture • How the color of the paper will work with the ink’s color • Whether the shape will fit into a standard envelope

  18. Practical Considerations for Stationery Design (3 of 3) • Papers and envelopes come in standard sizes. • A business card should be of a size and shape that fits into a wallet. • Know about printing processes; visit a good printer.

  19. Font Choices • Choosing a font for a logo should be based on: • Both form and expression • Denotative meaning of the font and the connotative meaning (heritage, voice, expressive meaning)

  20. Depicting Logo Shapes • Fundamental ways of depicting shapes or forms to make form-making easily comprehensible: • Elemental form: Line or flat tone used to reduce an image or subject to stark simplicity • High contrast: Depiction of forms based on extreme contrast of light/shadow falling on a three-dimensional form • Linear: Line used as the main element to depict or describe shape or form • Texture or pattern: Line or marks used to suggest form, light, texture, pattern, or tone using hatch, cross-hatch, cross-contour, dots, smudges, etc.

  21. Major Concerns • Concept • Expression • Graphic design

  22. Symbol (1 of 2) • An essential (uncomplicated) visual that represents something else – an idea, concept, or another thing – by association

  23. Symbols (2 of 2) • A symbol may be designed in any of the following configurations. • Pictorial symbol: representational image of an object or objects • Abstract symbol: an emphasis on the intrinsic form of a representational image, an extraction relating to a real object but modified with an abstract emphasis • Non-representational symbol: a non-objective or non-pictorial visual • Typographic symbol: letter(s) or word(s)

  24. Pictograms • A simple picture denoting an object, activity, place, or person

  25. Wayfinding Signs • Wayfinding signs and systems are used internationally to assist and guide visitors and tourists to find what they are looking for in museums, airports, zoos, and city centers.

  26. Summary (1 of 4) • A logo represents and embodies everything a brand or company signifies, providing immediate recognition. • Logos can take the form of a wordmark, a lettermark, a symbol mark, or a combination mark. • A logo plays a key role in the visual identity of a brand, social organization, or company. • A visual identity is the visual and verbal articulation of a brand or organization, including all pertinent design applications.

  27. Summary (2 of 4) • A standard manual is a guide to the use of the logo, ensuring recognition and guarding the logo’s value. • There are some fundamental ways of depicting shapes or forms. • A logo must be designed appropriately in terms of style, type, shapes, and symbols to express the spirit or personality of the product, service, or organization. • Learning historical periods and connotative meaning as applied to choosing fonts for logo design allows for greater expression.

  28. Summary (3 of 4) • A symbol is an essential visual that represents something else – an idea, concept, or another thing – by association. A symbol may be designed in a number of configurations. • Though nomenclature varies among design professionals and clients, most designers might agree that a symbol carries greater connotative and associative meaning than a sign.

  29. Summary (4 of 4) • A pictogram is a simple picture denoting an object, activity, place, or person; it is purely visual, non-verbal communication. • Wayfinding signs and systems are used internationally to assist and guide visitors and tourists to find what they are looking for in museums, airports, zoos, and city centers.