Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Administrator August 27, 2009 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Administrator August 27, 2009 PowerPoint Presentation
Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Administrator August 27, 2009

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Washington Wine Commission John Bookwalter Administrator August 27, 2009

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  1. Washington Wine CommissionJohn BookwalterChairmanAugust 27, 2009

  2. Washington Wine Industry • Phenomenal Growth • 19 wineries in 1981,650+ wineries today • 147,436 tons harvestedin 2008 • 8.5 million casesproduced in 2008 • 11th AVA designatedin April 2009 • $4.7 billion impact tothe national economy • Growing national andinternational acclaim

  3. Washington Wine Industry • Record Acclaim • 277 wines received 90+ points from Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate (2008) • 123 wines awarded 90+ points by Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar (2008) • Long Shadows Vintners named “Winery of the Year” by Food & Wine Magazine (2007) • Bob Betz named “Winemaker of the Year” by Sunset Magazine (2007) • 4 Washington wineries named to “Top 100 in the World” by Robb Report • Andrew Will Winery • DeLille Cellars • Leonetti Cellar • Quilceda Creek

  4. Washington Wine Industry • Strong Sales (in spite of economy) • National Trends • Overall, wine continues to outperform beer and spirits – Americans have finally discovered wine • Domestic wines are outperforming imports (France down 21%) • Growth in wine sales continues to be led by premium segments ($9-12, $12-15, and $15-up all near double-digit growth), although trend has slowed somewhat with economy. Washington State is considered a premium region. • Riesling is the fastest growing major varietal (up 24.7% over last year). Washington State is one of the world’s leading producers of Riesling.

  5. Washington Wine Industry • Strong Sales (in spite of economy) • Local Trends • Washington State is the hottest wine region in the country – sales by value up 19% over last year (Oregon down 3.7%, California up 6.5%), sales by volume up 9.5% over last year (Oregon up 8%, California up 2%). • Washington State currently has a 4% share of the total wine market and a 7% share of the domestic wine market in the United States, roughly equivalent to Napa Valley.

  6. Washington Wine Industry The Bottom Line… • Annual economic impact of $3 billion in-state, $4.7 billion nationally in 2006; up from $2.4 billion in 1999

  7. Washington Wine Industry Direct Impacts • Revenues • $436 million in 2006, up from $289 million in 1999 • Taxes • $145 million in-state, $58 million to other states, $269 million federally

  8. Washington Wine Industry Indirect Impacts • Employment • $579 million in payroll supporting 19,000 jobs, up from $350 million and 11,000 jobs in 1999 • Wine Tourism • $238 million in 2006, up from $19 million in 1999; a 1,157% increase

  9. Washington Wine Industry • Wine Tourism Booming • According to TIA, 17% of leisure travelers have engaged in wine and culinary travel – 27 million people • Washington State tourism is a $15 billion industry • Over 2 million people visit Washington wineries annually • Washington is among the top 15 states for food-related travel and the top 10 U.S. destinations for wine-related travel • Wine tourists typically stay longer (3.4 days) than average and spend more money in an area. More than 39% plan repeat visits • Washington wine country has seen a 29% increase in overnight visits in 3 years • Visitors to Washington wineries have a higher than average household income – $98,714 in 2006

  10. Washington Wine Commission • Represents • All bonded and licensed wineries in Washington • All wine grape growers in Washington Mission Raise positive awareness of the Washington wine industry and generate greater demand forits wines

  11. Washington Wine Commission Board of Commissioners • John Bookwalter, ChairJ. Bookwalter Winery • Kent Waliser, Vice ChairSagemoor • Peggy Patterson, TreasurerHoodsport Winery • Ted BaselerSte. Michelle Wine Estates • Dick BousheyBoushey Vineyards • Glenn CooganAscentia Wine Estates • Peter DowCavatappi Winery • Patricia GellesKlipsun Vineyards • Eric HurlburtWSDA • Mark LevineYoung’s Market Company • Steve NewhouseUpland Vineyards • Rick SmallWoodward Canyon Winery • Jay SoloffDeLille Cellars

  12. Washington Wine Commission • Six Strategies • Increase consumer demand through direct marketing • Reach out to the wine trade • Strengthen the commitment and unity of the industry • Increase awareness of the industry’s economic impact • Foster viticultural and enological research • Encourage professional staff development

  13. Washington Wine Commission • Key Metrics • Increased consumer awareness of Washington wines • Increased media coverage of Washington wines • Increased sales of Washington wines in target markets • Increased traffic to the Wine Commission website

  14. Local Consumer Events • Branded tastings promoted as destinationevents • Taste Washington! • Held annually in Seattle, Spokaneand targeted markets • Educational Seminars • 20something • Millennial-targeted event heldtwice annually in Seattle

  15. Local Trade Outreach • Washington Wine Months • March – Taste Washington Wine Month • Restaurant and Retail Promotions • August – Washington Wine Month • Retail Promotions • Washington Wine Restaurant Awards • Taste Washington Seattle weekend

  16. National Consumer Marketing • National branding campaign • Advertising • Media Outreach • Trade and Consumer Tastings • Target Markets • Tampa Bay • Austin • Denver • Phoenix • Chicago

  17. National Trade Outreach • Road TripWashington Wine • October 4 - 8 • 40 high-level national buyers • 50+ Washington wineries and vineyards participating

  18. International Marketing • Target Markets • Quebec • Japan • United Kingdom and Ireland • Japanese Deluxe Tour • Trade incentive program • Washington Wine Experience • International trade FAM tour • London Wine Fair • Montreal Trade Tasting

  19. Commitment to Research • 5% of Commission’s annual budget • Estimated $125,000 in 2009 • Proceeds fromcharitable eventsdirected toeducation andresearch throughthe WashingtonWine EducationFoundation

  20. Looking ahead… Now what? • Washington still only has a 7% share of the domestic wine market • Projecting a 5% increase in production each year over the next 5 years • Striving for a 10% share of the domestic 750ml market by 2011 • Must address serious workforce, infrastructure and marketing issues

  21. Looking ahead… How will we get there? • Position wine industry as an attraction/asset for business developmentand recruitment • Increase emphasis on wine tourism by leveraging state and localtourism efforts • Improve tourism infrastructure(e.g. signage, lodging, dining) • Reform state and federal liquor lawsand work with other regulatory bodies • Raise cross-functional industryknowledge (e.g. business finance,business operations, marketing) • Continue to invest in and growresearch and education programs

  22. Washington Wine Commission Questions or comments? Thank you!