Power Standards and SMART Goals; Expectations for Assessment and Data-based Decision-Making. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Power Standards and SMART Goals; Expectations for Assessment and Data-based Decision-Making. PowerPoint Presentation
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Power Standards and SMART Goals; Expectations for Assessment and Data-based Decision-Making.

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  1. Power Standards and SMART Goals; Expectations for Assessment and Data-based Decision-Making. Presented by: Ben Ditkowsky, Ph.D. Waukegan Unit School District 60

  2. Power Standards • A power standard refers to those few things that are really important to teach (Reeves). • BIG IDEAS (Kame’enui & Carnine) • Enduring understandings (Wiggins & McTigue) • The key question here seems simple: • What is it that we want students to know and be able to do?

  3. The practical reality of NCLB If we are going to be able to “leave no child behind” the state standards, then we are going to have to have a way of determining how far behind they are, from where we expect them to be, so that we can do something to accelerate their academic growth.

  4. …a way of determining how far behind they are, from where we expect them to be That means we need to use data to make decisions

  5. Good Use Plan and group for instruction Monitor student progress for a goal Identify a student as “at –risk” Identify new goals for students who have exceeded Promote student reflection and goal setting To adjust teaching practices Uses of data? + - To ensure file folders are not empty Monitor student progress for a goal Identify a student as “at –risk” Identify new goals for students who have exceeded expectations To decide who has failed to meet standards (grade retention) Promote student reflection and goal setting To adjust teaching practices Increase teacher anxiety Make high – stakes decision based on one test Plan and group for instruction Grade a pretest and send home Meet district compliance Lock students into a group Poor Use Grade a pretest and send home To ensure file folders are not empty Meet district compliance Lock students into a group Make high – stakes decision based on one test To decide who has failed to meet standards (grade retention) Increase teacher anxiety

  6. When we use data we need toFOCUS: Things to consider • Entry level skills • If students come in with less skill than we expect then we need to get them to learn more with the same amount of time. • Efficiency and Effectiveness of Instruction • Time on task • Intensity of instruction • Data-based decision-making • Frequency of Assessment • Use of data to drive instructional decision-making

  7. Typical students have a benefit over low performing students. They come in higher, so they don’t need to gain as much Keep in mind that we need to make sure students have prerequisite skills Entry Level Skills More Skill Less Skill

  8. To make up the difference, instruction should: Be focusedon the goal Maintain student time on-task Providesufficient practice to ensure students have the opportunity to learn Instruction More Skill Less Skill

  9. Assessment • The more dire the student needs, the more carefully we should watch their progress. • When students are not progressing, we need to change what they receive in terms of instruction. • The more dire the student needs, the more carefully we should watch their progress. • When students are not progressing, we need to change what they receive in terms of instruction.

  10. Monitoring progress requires us to pay attention • Is the instruction working? • Is it intense enough? • Do we need to change what we are doing? More Skill Less Skill

  11. Use Assessments from the Curriculum • To determine when to change instruction • Rule: 3 data points below the aim-line More Skill Less Skill

  12. Is it working now? Well enough to meet the goal? Continuously Evaluate More Skill Less Skill

  13. Is it working now? Continuously Evaluate More Skill Less Skill

  14. Set Goals, and make them smart! • S • M • A • R • T • Goals should be Specific and Strategic • Goals should be Observable and Measurable • Goals should be AcceptableAction oriented and Attainable • Goals should be Realistic and Relevant • Goals should be Trackable and Time-bound

  15. How do we know what goals to set? Use Power Standards: What is it that we want students to be able to DO?

  16. Curriculum-Based Measurement • Does how quickly a student can orally read relate to how well they do on ISAT? • Will a 5th grade student who… • … reads 120 cwpm meet standards? • What about a student who can read 150 cwpm, will they meet?

  17. Think – Pair -Share 1. Does fluency matter? Yes/No 2. How many words should a student in your class be able to read in a minute? 3. Why do you think so?

  18. Does Fluency really matter? • Does it matter? Yes/No • How many words should a 5th grade student read in a minute? Let’s consider some data…

  19. How many correct words did 5th grade students read in one minute? Does the number of words that students can read in one minute relate to how well they do on the ISAT? How many words can they read in a minute? Mark read 175 words Dorothy read 225 words Sarah read 147 words Kelsey read 120 words

  20. Some times we need to change the way we look at things before we can FOCUS. Let’s reorganize things

  21. Setting up a chart to compare scores Before ISAT testing what we knew was how fast students read a grade level passage. Exceeds Meets Below Warning Dorothy read 225 words Mark read 175 words Sarah read 147 words Kelsey read 120 words

  22. Setting up a chart to compare scores

  23. A note about “Scatter – Plots” Scatter-Plot can help us to see • How scores from two different tests relate to each other. • Where we should set cut-points for students meeting expectations • How we can increase student’s chances to meet ISAT Standards.

  24. Looking at relations How did she do? Dorothy read 225 Words in a minute And Dorothy obtained a 169 on ISAT Let’s see how Dorothy did on ISAT… BDitkowsky@Waukeganschools.org

  25. Let’s consider…

  26. Students who read less than 120 correct words per minute She read 120 words correctly in a minute She obtained a score of 150 on ISAT Remember Kelsey? 100% of (62, 5th grade) students who read less than 120 words per minute were below state standards on ISAT

  27. Students who read less than 130 correct words per minute 100% of (62, 5th grade) students who read less than 130 words per minute were below state standards on ISAT

  28. Students who read less than 140 correct words per minute 77% of (62, 5th grade) students who read less than 140 words per minute were below state standards on ISAT

  29. What can we infer about students who are not fluent readers and ISAT? (<150 cwpm) 75% of (62, 5th grade) students who read less than 150 words per minute were below state standards on ISAT

  30. Think – Pair - Share What are two reasons why you think the speed at which our students read influences their scores on high – stakes tests? • There is time to complete the test. • 2. They don’t have to spend time decoding, instead they can spend time comprehending.

  31. Let’s consider just the students who read more than 150 correct words per minute And Dorothy? Remember Mark? 90% of (62, 5th grade) students who read more than 150 words per minute were above state standards on ISAT.

  32. Place your bets • If you were going to bet that a student was going to meet expectations on the ISAT who would you choose? • A student who reads 120 cwpm? • 100% of our sample did not • A student who reads 130 cwpm? • 100% of our sample did not • … 140 cwpm? Or 150 cwpm? • 77% and 75% of our sample did not • What about a student who reads more than 150 cwpm? • 90% of our sample of students reading more than 150 cwpm met State Standards. • Pick your student.

  33. For 5th grade students By April 2, 200x When given a randomly selected passage from the 5th grade Reading Series and one minute to read 90% of students will orally read 150 words correctly with 95 to 98% accuracy Specific Measurable Action-oriented Relevant Time-bound Consider the data: 90% of 5th grade students who read 150 words correctly met ISAT standards Reading CBM: An Instructional Focus by grade level

  34. Think – Pair - Share What are two factors that WE CAN CONTROL, other than the speed at which children read, that might influence their scores on high – stakes tests? • Vocabulary • 2. Comprehension strategies • 3. Other Basic skills • 4. Language skill • 5. Test – taking strategies, etc…

  35. What about 3rd Grade? 100% of students who read 140 CWPM met ISAT Standards 92% of students who read 94 CWPM or more met ISAT Standards 93% of students who read 115 CWPM or more met ISAT Standards 9/14 : 64% of students who read less than 94 did not meet ISAT Standards Can you see a pattern?

  36. Should Oral Reading Fluency be a FOCUS for third grade? Consider this: • 92% of 3rd students in the (2 school sample) who read more than 115 words correctly in one minute met ISAT standards. • Fewer than 10% of students who failed to read at a target rate of 85 cwpm met ISAT standards. • Make goals S, M, A, R, T By April 2, 200x, when given a randomly selected passage from the 3rd grade Harcourt Reading Series and one minute to read, 90% of 3rd grade students will orally read 94 words correctly with 95 to 98% accuracy

  37. Re-confirmation of data (Grade 3 N > 500)

  38. Re-confirmation with data (Grade 5 N > 500)

  39. What should we expect? • Some variation is expected in oral reading fluency depending on passage difficulty, but clear targets are supported: • Grade 3 • Fall - 60 is cause for concern  80 is a target • Winter - 75 is cause for concern  100 is a target • Spring - 90 is cause for concern  115 is a target • Grade 5 • Fall - 95 is cause for concern  130 is a target • Winter - 125 is cause for concern  145 is a target • Spring - 140 is cause for concern  155 is a target

  40. What about Vocabulary? • A pilot for middle school Grade level Teams Identify critical vocabulary Student friendly definintions

  41. Vocabulary Matching - CBM 18 4 16 5 14 20 1 7 10 11 3 17 22 13 8 6 26 12 21 25

  42. Administration and ScoringVocabulary Matching • VM Curriculum-Based Measurement can be individually or group administered. Teacher Student Reads standardized directions Reads for two to five minutes. Writes the number of words matching definitions Monitors student performance on practice items Monitors students while they take the test. Counts the total number of correctly circled items

  43. Does Vocabulary relate to how well students do on the state test? • How many students who obtained a score of fewer than 5 on a VM (5 minutes) measure met standards for grade 7 science? • How about 10? • What about more than 10 correct? 34% 65% 97%

  44. Does Vocabulary relate to how well students do on the state test? Likely NOT to Meet Likely to Meet Standards

  45. The Measurement Pool • What words will a successful student know by the end of the school year? • The student is likely to know some of the key words before you begin. • As the year progresses, more words are taught, and more words are learned

  46. How can writing be assessed at the classroom level A first grade classroom example, goals and data: By March 19, 200X, when given a writing prompt, 90% first grade students will write a complete sentence in the language of instruction that directly includes the prompt in the response with an explanation (quality).

  47. A complete sentence includes (1) a noun and a verb (2) begins with a capital letter, (3) ends with punctuation, (4) has a space between words. 5) To exceed means more than one sentence with 4 elements. By December 19, 200X, when given a writing prompt, 90% of first grade students will write a complete sentence in the language of instruction. 88% met the goal

  48. By January 19, 200X, when given a writing prompt, 90% of first grade students will write a [part 1]complete sentence in the language of instruction that [part 2] directly includes theprompt in the response (quality). 93% met part 1 of the goal 77% met part 2 of the goal A complete sentence includes (1) a noun and a verb (2) begins with a capital letter, (3) ends with punctuation, (4) has a space between words. (5) more than one sentence with 4 elements,

  49. What do we need to do when not everyone meets? • Meet with peers / peer mentors (Grade 1 Team meetings) • Instructional support • Increasing focus and intensity of instruction By January 19, 200X, when given a writing prompt, 90% of first grade students will write a [part 1]complete sentence in the language of instruction that [part 2] directly includes theprompt in the response (quality). 93% met part 1 of the goal 77% met part 2 of the goal

  50. 78 % By March 19, 200X, when given a writing prompt, 90% of 1st grade students will write a complete sentence in the language of instruction that directly includes theprompt in the response with an explanation (quality). A complete sentence includes (1) a noun and a verb (2) begins with a capital letter, (3) ends with punctuation, (4) has a space between words. (5) more than one sentence with 4 elements,