TAKS OER Crossover Question - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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TAKS OER Crossover Question

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  1. TAKS OER Crossover Question

  2. OER Notes OERs are Open Ended Response questions. There are three OER questions on the TAKS: • Narrative – asks a question about the Narrative story • Expository – asks a question about the Expository story • Crossover – asks a question connecting the Narrative and the Expository.

  3. OER Crossover When answering a CROSSOVER OER, • You MUST give an answer for both texts. • You MUST give proof from both texts! • Answer – Narrative • “Proof” – Narrative • Answer – Expository • “Proof” – Expository • Insightful Explanation- how do the 2 answers tie together. WARNING- this is where many students write themselves out of a 2 and into a 0 or 1. DO NOT introduce new ideas in the explanation!

  4. OER Scores OERs are graded on a 0-3 scale: 0 – no answer • wrong answer 1– no text • Text, but no idea • Weak connection between answer and text 2 – idea supported by relevant connected text 3– a “2” answer + a “depth of understanding”

  5. ____ANSWER____  Text Evidence Evidence supports idea Mary shows she loves her dog by taking care of her. Mary did this by “walking her every day, and brushing her coat.” ANSWER_text evidence Evidence extends the idea, but doesn’t PROVE it. Mary shows she loves her dog by taking care of her. The dog “followed her around the house all day, every day.” If you can’t find proof, find a new answer! OER Proof- Proof from the text MUST SUPPORT your answer.

  6. Let’s look at some examples. • Use the benchmark packet and the OER scoring rubric as a guide as we go through these examples. • The question is: What is one similarity between the actions of the boy in “Set Free” and the actions of the father in “Summer of the Raccoons”? Explain your answer and support it with evidence from both selections.

  7. Example of a 0 • In both passages the fathers both are very attached to their son’s. In “set free” the boys father plays a game, “his father held him tight in his arms and wouldn’t let him go.” In “Summer of the Raccoons he sees his son differently. “Tall, broad-sholdered Daniel wasn’t talking raccoons, [Don’t do anything for her that she can’t do for herself]. He was talking parents. The object is to take care of them untill they can take care of themselves.” “It was time to let go.”

  8. Why is this answer a 0? • The student states that the fathers are both very attached to their sons and offers textual support for this idea from both stories. However, this analysis addresses a different question from the one asked. How do we avoid this in our own answers?

  9. Example of a 0 • The similarity between the father in story 2 and the boy in story 1 was there relationship with there pets.

  10. Why is this answer a 0? • The student offers an idea (the similarity between the father and the boy was their relationship with their pets) that is too vague to determine whether it is reasonable. How can we avoid this in our own answers?

  11. Example of a 1 • Both the boy and the father love their animals. The boy loves his dog but wants to free him. The father at first does not like the raccoons but he later learns to love them. Paragraph 3 on “Set Free” tells us that the boy loves his dog. Paragraph 27 on “Summer of the Raccoons” also lets us know how the father feels for the raccoons. Therefore they both love their pets and want the best for them.

  12. Why is this answer a 1? • In this response the student offers the idea that both the boy and the father love their animals. The student supports the idea with textual evidence from “Set Free” but offers no textual support for the father’s feelings for the raccoons.

  13. Example of a 1 • One similerity between the two is the fact that they both went to help an animal or animals. The boy in set free feels his dog is unhappy due to his confinment to the boys backyard. He thinks releasing him will solve it. The father in summer of the raccoons at first is just planning to get them up on their feet and releasing them, but comes to realize it is the time for them to live on their own.

  14. Why is this answer a 1? • The student offers a reasonable idea (one similarity between the two is the fact that they want to help an animal or animals) and provides a series of events from both selections. This attempt at textual evidence is too general to be considered a specific synopsis in support of this idea. How can we avoid making this mistake in our own answers?

  15. Example of a 2 • In “Set Free” and “Summer of the Raccoons” the boy and the father were reluctant to release their pet without concern for their survival or safety. In “Set Free” the boy is releasing his dog. “He hesitated, He hoped he dog wouldn’t get lost” In “Summer of the Raccoons” the father is releasing his raccoons. “I don’t want them to get lost or hurt out there.” Both are concerned over releasing their pets into the wild.

  16. Why is this answer a 2? • In this sufficient response that student presents the similarity that both the boy and the father are concerned about releasing their pets into the wild. This is a reasonable idea that the student supports with direct quotations from both selections.

  17. Example of a 2 • The actions of the boy in “Set Free” and the actions of the father is “Summer of the Raccoons” have one similarity; they both made a big decision. In “Set Free” the boy could identify himself with the dog because he knew the dog was frustrated by being strained, just like he felt when his father “held him tight in his arms and wouldn’t let (him) go. “After having second thoughts and taking the risk of being scold “He released the dog’s collar…and stood back feeling miserable…” On the other hand in the “Summer of the Raccoons” the father decides not to overprotect his son and raccoons even though he doesn’t want them to get lost or hurt. “He learns the object (of parents) is to take care of them until they can take care of themselves” and not living their life for them.

  18. Why is this answer a 2? • In this response the student offers a clear and specific connection between the actions of the boy and the father in that they both make a big decision. An analysis of the boy’s decision to release the dog despite his reservations is clearly supported with text. The father’s decision not to overprotect is supported with text for both his son and the raccoons.

  19. Example of 3 • The boy is struggling with his relationship with his father and was frustrated when “his father held him tight in his arms and wouldn’t let go.” He thought “it was not right for the dog to be tied just as it was not right for his father to hug him tight and laugh at him.” He sees freeing the dog as freeing himself. “The pain was too real to the boy; he had to do something.” Caught “somewhere between my flagging authority and his [son’s] rush for independence,” the father in the 2nd story eventually realizes that when his son urges him to free the raccoons, Daniel is “talking parents.” A haunting voice tells him, “The object is to take care of them until they can take care of themselves.” For him, freeing the raccoons is freeing his son.

  20. Why is this answer a 3? • The student offers a particularly insightful analysis linking the boy’s behavior to that of the father (He sees freeing the dog as freeing himself; For him, freeing the raccoons is freeing his son). Strong and accurate textual evidence creates a meaningful connection across both selections. What can you take from this type of answer to improve your own answer?

  21. Example of a 3 • “Go get a banana for her,” says the father in “Summer of the Raccoons” when the released female raccoon reappears. The son responds “No, it’s time she made it on her own.” The father realizes his son “wasn’t talking raccoons. He was talking parents.” In that moment the father understands that parents take care of the children until they can take care of themselves and it was “time to let go” of his son and the now half-wild raccoons. The boy in “Set Free” identifies with the dog. “He knew the dog, knew how he felt.” He thinks that letting the dog loose will get rid of the frustration he feels when his father hugs him and won’t let him go. Because he is so young, he is confused when the dog does not run away. Therefore, although the actions are similar, the boy’s conflict is not resolved while the father in the other selection is more at peace.

  22. Why is this answer a 3? • This response offers the idea that both the boy and the father are similar in recognizing that they must let go (it was time to let go of his son and the now half-wild raccoons. He thinks that letting the dog loose will get rid of the frustration he feels when his father hugs him). The student provides strong, integrated direct quotations to support this idea and adds depth to the analysis by suggesting that although their actions are similar, the consequences of the boy’s actions are quite different from those of the father.

  23. Your turn to evaluate! • With the use of your scoring rubric, you will evaluate and score examples of OER Crossover answers. In addition to scoring each answer, you will explain why you gave each answer the score you did. The previous slides are a great model for this!